Vintage Dublin Bus Porn

at

Bus

A  DF587 on route 83, on Aungier St, Dublin in 1987.

With the former W&R Jacob’s biscuit factory, which was destroyed by a fire in the same year, in the background.

Taken by Jonathan McDonell

Via Big Monster Love 

Previously: Vintage Dublin Bus Porn

May Contain Vintage Dublin Bus Porn

 

37 thoughts on “Vintage Dublin Bus Porn

    1. Bacchus

      it was deliberate. Property was bought up by “developers” and then then let fall into that state. Once it was that bad the Corporation (as it was then) wouldn’t bother imposing protection orders or any of the costly nonsense involved with listed buildings. It was quite a cosy arrangement really. The streets behind The Bleeding Horse (now gone) were often used by film crews to depict bombed out Belfast or WW2 era London.

      Hume Street was saved, the Georgian facades of Harcourt Street were saved but Mount Street was ripped down and turned into another “Grand Canyon” of office blocks

      1. cluster

        I have wondered about that in recent times as well. Cycling through the centre of the city from the south inner suburbs to the north inner suburbs, there are a fair amount of nice properties in decent areas which are derelict.

        How can this be?

        Is there anything the council can do to seize them? Or impose an increased property tax on properties left vacant?

        1. Bacchus

          Empty buildings now are because of a recession but the wilful destruction of Dublin started back in the 70s, before the recession. The derelict sites of the 80s didn’t arrive overnight, they were over a decade in the making.
          The logic was simple. An old building might have to be restored but a rotten shell was dangerous and the corpo would be glad if someone would knock it down and rebuild something new. Speculators bought old Georgian houses and just sat on them (no not literally) until they would get whatever planning decisions they wanted.

          1. Smeghead

            Plus, they made an extra few bob from the cleared sites. I worked briefly in the old Saggart quarry in the mid 90’s. There was a constant stream of dump trucks full of old red brick rubble. These red bricks were extracted, chipped clean and stacked 500 blocks to a pallet and resold to renovators of existing Georgian properties at a hefty price as they HAD to be used to keep the original look to buildings being restored or extended.

          2. ex pat

            You are not far wrong; speculators bought Georgian Houses for the purposes you state but they only did so in very select locations.

            The likes of Jacobs probably was not left open deliberately as many houses were; it would have sat n the Jacbs balance sheet awaiting a better market and its transfer into civic use as eventually happened.

            Sadly the new danger is apathy amongst lenders who have no interest in lending money to borrowers under water to carry out even basic structural repairs. Sadly with many of these buildings surface car-parking is the only way they are going to yield income as in the absence of urban renewal grants the figures simply do not stack up to restore them to type of standard expected by local authorities.

            Smart money is buying the odd one that falls through the cracks of higher bidding levels and is carrying out the stitch in time type repairs pending tax breaks.

    2. Spaghetti Hoop

      The quays were particularly bad; derelict tenement buildings were held up by wooden joists and exposed RSJs. You could still see the old wallpaper, picture and fireplace impressions. The wooden hoarding was up so long much of it had rotted away. Speaking of fireplaces, hundreds were ripped out of derelict Georgian houses along with sinks, bannisters etc. by salvage-hunters. Nothing was protected.

    3. cluster

      Until the late 80s, a lot of British cities were as well.

      Stagflation and a decline of inner cities as people moved out in search of suburbian houses and gleaming new shopping centres robbed city centres of much of their vitality.

      1. Eliot Rosewater

        For further information (and much of the information above) check out Destruction of Dublin. I think it was pulled from bookshops but can be got second hand. Shocking stuff.

  1. wubbelz

    is DIT on the former site of the Jacobs factory? Id love to see one of those google street composites,

  2. Nukenelly

    That’s more-or-less the site of Aungier Street DIT isn’t it? Hard to imagine…

  3. General Waste

    Next time some kid (or someone older who should know better) bangs on about how bad things are or how much of a kip Dublin is, show them this.

    Actual mass emigration (and not to Vancouver or Perth either), up to 60% PAYE for those who had jobs, 15% interest on mortgages, Dublin literally falling down, the rest of the country in even worse shape, state under a Catholic grip, no divorce, homophobic discrimination, the list is endless.

    1. DeepRiver

      Have to agree. Things aren’t great now, but thankfully we haven’t seen a return to the type of poverty that was around in the 80’s.

      1. JIMMY J

        100% about that? At least back then if you were having the cornflakes for dinner you didn’t have a mortgage financially and mentally strangling you to death.

        1. DeepRiver

          Very sure. I lived it. Have relatives living below the breadline now too but nothing in comparison to what they went through. And none of my poor relatives ever had a mortgage. That was for people we considered “rich”.

        2. Naughtius

          The levels of debt are way higher now, I doubt there were many 100% mortgages or credit cards in the 80’s. Most disposable income will now go to pay debt.

          1. ex pat

            Its a very different type of poverty; then dole just about paid for food and utilities; now if you’ve got the brass neck to hand back the keys, cut up the cards then you can live quite well on basic welfare and benefits.

  4. martco

    as regards that particular bus…
    sitting in the upper deck down the back (gasmasks needed if u ended up downstairs at back) it was better than a day out at Funderland…if the bus took a corner the whole body would bend and take on a kind of trapezoidal aspect
    good times

    1. Moan

      No. You’re confusing these buses with the green Bombardier ones.
      The Bombardier buses used to roll mightily. Particularly good upstairs as it passed down the hill by St.Anne’s in Milltown.

    1. Sinabhfuil

      There’s a model of it, including the factory floor, in the basement of the architectural archive on Merrion Square.

  5. Maa

    I used to hate sitting on those buses in the summer, your legs used to stick to the horrible blue/grey pleather seats

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