De Saturday Papers

at

examIDM 150711Screen Shot 2015-07-11 at 00.19.251107IF1_01photo 2-38photo 1-39CJlL_lvWIAArYzNCJlIBdMWoAEHHisCJk5WVRXAAAT1x3CJkvkqqWgAAzBkN
CJlB7IpWoAAEZx1
CJktTEWWIAA_GTM

MORE to folly

Covers to broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

7 thoughts on “De Saturday Papers

  1. dereviled

    200k for minister seems fair given the hours and responsibility. However I would increase the pension if it meant they didn’t continue working afterwards in the private sector.

    1. Kieran NYC

      +1

      Either they take the pension and don’t work, or forgo it and work in the private sector. They can start it again when they actually retire.

      One of the reasons for paying ministers relatively well is to discourage them from seeking alternative income that might corrupt them and so they don’t need to lobby after they’ve finished with politics. Doesn’t seem to be working very well in Ireland…

      1. dereviled

        Yes certainly delay the pension until they actually retire.
        I was thinking though of conflicts of interest, such as a minister for transport joining a construction company or a health minister joining a drug company, that it would be possible to have a version of a non-compete clause. Would it help a minister be more impartial?

    2. Spaghetti Hoop

      I agree in offering a 3 figure salary while at the helm; but their pensions are ludicrous. 67 is an awful old age for an average worker / voter to get a pension. Some could work for over 40 years and die before retirement – aye some with mortgages outstanding. Politicians wouldn’t do the job if they had to wait until 67 to retire.

      1. dereviled

        I suggest increasing the pension so they can afford to retire when they want and many pension ages are a lot less than 67years.
        Financial security might allow them to make decisions that could see them ‘blackballed’ in a particular industry or profession on leaving office. Specific clauses would reinforce that.

Comments are closed.