17 Years Ago Today

at

C9DDSGvXgAETuZp

Liam Thornton tweetz:

The adult rate of #directprovision allowance was set on 10 April, 2000 at €19.10 per week (IR£15)- no change to this rate in 17 years.

Previously: Direct Provision on Broadsheet

41 thoughts on “17 Years Ago Today

  1. This monkey's gone to heaven

    What is your point? There’s nothing stopping you making a donation.

    1. Brother Barnabas

      if you genuinely can’t see his point, you’re a fool
      if you can actually see his point but just don’t agree, you’re a d1ck

  2. whut

    i’ll open up with the less liberal viewpoint… they’re safe, they’re fed, they’re away from what they escaped from. if the country was ran better, we would have more to offer them. however, it’s ran very badly and we can’t support our own public services. but we still keep these refugees safe and fed.

    1. MoyestWithExcitement

      We’re one of the proprtionately wealthiest countries in the world. We just choose to give discounts to millionaires as opposed to, say, adequate supplies for and of teachers and respect for people who come here fleeing war.

    2. ahjayzis

      They aren’t refugees, nor are they illegal immigrants. They’re in limbo. Because we don’t assess their applications in anything approaching a timely manner. People can rot in these places for a decade. And I do mean rot. You can’t work. You can’t undertake higher ed. You can’t even cook a meal for your family. Think of what would happen to your own mental health to be kennelled like that with no personal agency or opportunities to improve your lot. If our political system spent half the effort on fixing this situation as they do making sure Irish people in the US aren’t deported to one of the wealthiest countries in the world it’d be fixed.

      1. This monkey's gone to heaven

        Perish the thought that a nation would look after her own native born citizens as a priority

        1. ahjayzis

          It should and in many cases does. The idea, born out of World War 2, is that we should strive to offer safe haven and aid to people who desperately need it also – that also being the mark of a civilised and decent society.

          We don’t have a budget account called “help4citizens” where all funding for humanitarian help comes from. We also have tax raising powers, we give millions to dog racing every year, horse racing, football, we let coorporations write off any number of things against tax, we’re appealing a judgement awarding us several billion from Apple, every Irish Water employee got a bonus last year.

          So quit pretending everything we give to a Syrian refugee is something robbed from a homeless Irish person and just come out and say you don’t like foreigners.

          1. This monkey's gone to heaven

            “So quit pretending everything we give to a Syrian refugee is something robbed from a homeless Irish person and just come out and say you don’t like foreigners.”

            – I know you’re only trolling me now but please show me where I said that

            And PS get down off your high horse, you’ll get dizzy up there.

          2. ahjayzis

            “Perish the thought that a nation would look after her own native born citizens as a priority”

            Is your scroll function broken? Here’s your quote. Why don’t you explain what you meant if you didn’t mean helping foreigners means putting less of a priority on helping Irish citizens? If we help Irish homeless people are we betraying Irish people with cancer?

          3. This monkey's gone to heaven

            No one said we shouldn’t offer aid or succour to foreign refugees.

            The point made is that if there has to be uneven distribution of resources (there always has, it’s an unfair world) then native born citizens should be prioritised.

            I get that you feel that all ‘children of the earth’ should be cherished equally etc.

            Fine – but raise some money and perhaps try and fill the deficit with charitable donations. Have you organised anything like this lately? I’d be glad to donate.

          4. ahjayzis

            “The point made is that if there has to be uneven distribution of resources (there always has, it’s an unfair world) then native born citizens should be prioritised.”

            Get granular here for me – what are you talking about? What even is this other than a statement of pointless nativism? How do you know how much to dock Irish Aid to make sure we’re not pissing all over Irish homeless people? And we’re still going to give money to dog racing and Irish Water execs, yeah? You’re definitely all for cutting aid to war refugees over greyhounds or an extra few cent on a pint?

            Sure, if you’re genuine I’ve a DD set up with Amnesty and the UNHCR – I’m sure they’d appreciate you doing likewise.

      2. Cian

        Anyone provide stats on how long (on average) it takes to be processed?

        We hear of small numbers of people that it took 10+ years to process – but these people usually have had their application refused multiple times, and they have appealed multiple times. So are the outliers.

          1. Cian

            Thanks. From there I was able to find more: http://www.ria.gov.ie/en/RIA/Pages/2016_Statistics

            Interestingly (for me anyway), in 2016 there were 2,244 applications. Currently, there are only 823 people in Direct Provision for less than a year. So that suggests the other 1,400 people were (somehow) processed and either granted refugee status, or returned home.

            In the 17 years since 2000 there have been 77,000 applicants. There are now 4,400 in Direct Provision.

          2. classter

            I can’t be the only one who absolutely does not understand why the average case would take the guts of 4 years.

    3. Cian

      “Unlike the situation in some other EU countries, the education of children resident in RIA accommodation is mainstreamed i.e. children of asylum seekers may access free Primary and Post-Primary education and school transport in the same manner as the general population.”

          1. ivan

            Nice. Go and listen to Beatles for Sale. It’s not as bad as everybody says it is. Apart from Mr Moonlight.

        1. Starina

          yeah, and i know all their songs as well as everyone else but in fairness they were also rather bloodless and harmless by comparison to the wildness of the decade they were in.

          1. rotide

            That’s nonsense. They were one of the many direct inspirations for the hedonism you are talking about.

            It’s easy to look back now and not realise how groundbreaking they actually were.

    1. Dead Poets Society

      I was in first year. My only concern was whether I had enough money for the tuck/shed shop.

  3. Diddy

    Sadly it’s this cruel treatment of economic migrants that keeps numbers low. Word filters back to the millions outside our European city walls that Ireland is not a good place to claim asylum. Never underestimate the ingenuity and intelligence network of those outside the walls. They are desperate to get in.

  4. Peter Dempsey

    The rate was sent in the Irish pound era. Like some current account charges like 3.81 and 12.70

Comments are closed.