This just in.

Homelessness figures for July 2017 from the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government.

Read ’em and weep.

Homeless Report July

37 thoughts on “How Many?

  1. Mysterybeat

    At this rate I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s a pool going at Cabinet to see how quickly they can get to 4000. “Put me in for €50 on Christmas Eve!”

    1. Paps

      increase of 78 from last month.

      2973 – 4000 = 1027
      1027 / 78 = 13.1

      = sometime around October 2018… at this rate..

      1. Mysterybeat

        An increase of 1 is a bad thing. My point was that nobody at Cabinet (the executive body that runs or nation’s affairs) seems to be doing anything about it.

  2. Cian

    Is this presented badly – or is it me ? Are adults counted twice in the two slides?

    The top slide says there are 3,528 homeless adults in Dublin.
    The bottom says, in families, there are 1,586 Adults with 2,423 dependants. Are these 1,586 adults included in the 3,528?

    Is the total for Dublin 3,528 + 2,423 = 5,951
    or 3,528 + 2,423 + 1,586 = 7,537

    1. Cian

      Looks like its the bigger number.
      Wow – this is presented badly. Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government should add a new slide to their deck making this clear (although they have been using the same format for ages which allows easy comparison month-on-month)

      1. Fact Checker

        Statistics compiled by the Department of Housing are notoriously badly presented and have been for years.

        They should give the CSO a call for some advice on how to do it.

  3. Spaghetti Hoop

    The Rural Development Scheme could alleviate the Dublin problem somewhat, I hope, if the Government Scheme is funded fully* AND if Dubliners were willing to move. Would you be willing to move a couple of counties if you found yourself without a home and a job? Ireland is still very under-populated in half of its counties.

    *with re-settlement incentives, travel vouchers and enterprise schemes

      1. Fact Checker

        The intensely local approach to social housing is not working.

        There are housing shortages in Dublin, Cork and a few other urban areas.

        There are vast swathes of the west and north west – thanks to tax policies of 15 years ago – where housing is cheap and abundant.

        Policy should really focus on offering people on urban housing lists dwellings in rural areas.

        1. Cian

          Agreed – but I can’t see it working.
          I suppose there is no harm in trying, although you need to be careful that the locals are cared for first.

          1. Fact Checker

            But the vacancy rates in these places are very high.

            A quick browse of daft shows plenty of houses and apartments for sale or rent by comparison to most urban areas.

        2. A snowflake's chance in hell

          Absolutely correct

          It makes my blood boil when the poverty industry enables the underclass to demand their ‘right’ to housing in an estate beside their ma so they continue to perpetually produce unwanted bastards

        3. Spaghetti Hoop

          Agree. There have been positive stories of people wilfully moving to underpopulated counties like Leitrim – this should be offered to families facing unaffordable rents in the city. Alas there are stories where housing list families were offered rural accommodation but refused it or surrendered it because they didn’t want to leave the mother / sister / cousin / fella / local pub and chipper etc. – many strapped families help each other out with childcare. Then there is the expectation that if your circumstances are tough enough, and you’ve enough kids, the ‘free gaff’ will eventually come – the prize of all freeloaders.

          1. A snowflake's chance in hell

            I like you Hoop. Fair play, you tell it like it is unlike the other virtue signallers on this.

    1. Rob_G

      It would also act as helpful redistribution of income to these counties as well. Even if it was harder for people to find a job, their social welfare payments would go further than they would in Dublin, and help to stimulate these local economies, which would eventually have the effect of creating jobs in these areas.

      1. Fact Checker

        It is generally much easier to find work (particularly low skilled work) in urban areas than rural areas.

        Despite this, there are many households in social housing in urban areas with very little employment history or prospect of it.

        Meanwhile, many of their neighbours in full-time employment are paying very high rents so they can live close to employment.

        There is a big equity issue here.

          1. A snowflake's chance in hell

            No it wouldn’t.

            Centrist parties who believe in people working for a living still comprise the majority of the TD’s in the Dáil. If more of them had the balls to come out and tell the truth about the kind of society we want the redundant left would be completely eliminated here.

          2. Rob_G

            Asking everyone to pay a few euros a month in water charges nearly brought down the government; no-one is going to touch a policy that can be framed as ‘tearing apart communities’ with a 10-foot barge pole.

          3. A snowflake's chance in hell

            Nonsense.

            Not many opposed the idea of paying for water, the perspective of many centrists like myself was that the issue was future privatisation, had the matter simply been clarified in that respect the rate of compliance would have been higher.

          4. Fact Checker

            @ASCIH

            That issue was clarified.

            The Water Services Act 2014 has a clause in it that says no privitisation can ever be contemplated without a popular vote in favour, pretty much a referendum.

            Water under the bridge at this point I guess…….

          5. A snowflake's chance in hell

            Yes Fact, I am aware that was done in the end, however don’t you think it would have been best to address that in the first rollout of the scheme, given the siteserv fiasco?

          6. Fact Checker

            Personally, no, because the existing legislation already precluded privitisation.

            Anyone who knows anything about the policy knew it was never remotely considered, or even relevant.

          7. A snowflake's chance in hell

            That’s not the point though is it Fact (jaysus you’re a right dose or else deliberately obtuse)?

            The point is that the opponents of water charges successfully disseminated a point of view that that was the intention of the proponents and this message was never successfully dissuaded until it was too late.

          8. Fact Checker

            I like to think I am both:D

            But on your point, there was a lot of spurious information put about, yes.

  4. Catherinecostelloe

    I was reading that 2 weeks is maximum time allowed for homeless in hotels in Scotland for families before they are rehoused. Why are we tolerating the continuing fiasco in Dublin spending 50 million on hotels? That would buy 250 houses at 200,000 each and still be left with assets. And there are laws in the UK preventing exactly what’s happening to children in hotel rooms in Dublin. Human rights are breached and taxpayers money is down the drain.

    1. Cian

      a) Because there aren’t houses for them to be rehoused into.
      b) because the 50million is housing more than 250 families
      c) where would you get 250 houses in Dublin for €200,000?

  5. Eamonn Moran

    If you believe FG is a Neo-liberal party who believe that that they need to create the motivation for correct behaviors in society as they have shown consistently since entering government (just as has happened in the US and more recently in the UK) homelessness is a necessary part of the plan. Neo Liberals believe that creating insecurity and fear leads to economic growth. If people are insecure in their job, if they are insecure about having a roof over their heads, they are more motivated to work harder and complain less.

    1. A snowflake's chance in hell

      And so they should be. For too many years here we always had a liberal social policy that bred unproductive and poorly educated bastards to drug users and teenage sluts.

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