Unfit For A Minister

at | 22 Replies

The outskirts of Dunboyne, County Meath

Aaaa writes:

Empty House just outside Dunboyne, Meath. Belonging to a certain Richard Bruton. He also has a bundle of land that has been zoned for years, with no sign of any movement on it.

Surely if it’s not going to be built on then it shouldn’t be zoned, as that’s skewing the figures for available land to build on, which is one of the reasons many applications are turned down (an ‘abundance’ of zoned land in the area).

Fight!

Empty gaffs to broadsheet@broadsheet.ie marked ‘Empty Gaffs’.

22 thoughts on “Unfit For A Minister

      1. Helga.

        And the acres of unused, idle land? Speculating on price rises while the rest are homeless, though marginally homeless by international standards apparently.

        Reply
        1. forfuppssake

          Roight it oohhhh oohhh. Give a homeless person your spare bed tonight and I will think ofyou at my son’s first communion.

          Reply
          1. GoddessDurga

            Nobody’s talking about giving. But this could be a snug little home for a commuting family who paid rent for it, surely?

          2. forfuppssake

            “But this could be a snug little home for a commuting family who paid rent for it, surely”.
            You better look like a Goddess to compensate for this utterance.

        2. Owen C

          It doesn’t say anywhere that the land is idle. Or that it was a speculative purchase. Just that some of the land is zoned and not built on. Richard Bruton’s dad was a farmer with a 400 acre farm, and the register of members interests says it is still classified as farmland.

          Reply
          1. Aaaa

            I don’t think the land is idle…they’re getting silage off it as far as I know.

            I also don’t think it was a purchase, I think it was in their family for generations.

            The issue I’d have is that it’s skewing the figures for planning. It’s been zoned for years (before the boom if I’m correctly informed) and with 2 periods of high house prices, it doesn’t seem to be on the agenda to build on this at all. Thus why keep it zoned? According to this report from 2014 (http://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/default/files/migrated-files/en/Publications/DevelopmentandHousing/Planning/FileDownLoad%2C40214%2Cen.pdf) zoned land in Meath had capacity for 52,207 houses. The council use this figure in some cases to refuse additional zoning of land as they are afraid of ghost estates becoming rife.

            If you take out the land such as Bruton’s which seems unlikely to be built on, this would reduce quite dramatically I think, which might make it easier for zoning in other places by developers who might actually look to supply houses.

            If anyone has any other info to refute this I’d be glad to hear it.

          2. Aaaa

            Better source of info and quotes…
            https://meathcountydevelopmentplan.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/lap-additional-policies-objectives-and-residential-land-evaluations_26052014_accepted-changes.pdf

            ‘It is clear from Table 9A that there is an excess of residentially zoned land in Dunboyne in comparison to that now required to satisfy the household allocation.’

            ‘The land use zoning objectives map has identified the lands required to accommodate the household allocation of 1,578 no. units. It should be noted that there is already headroom of 50% included in the household allocations (Table 2.4 of the Meath County Development Plan 2013 – 2019 Volume I refers) and thus there is no justification for the release of any additional lands over and above those specified in Table 12 and illustrated on the land use zoning objectives map for Dunboyne.’

          3. Owen C

            Good and fair analysis. Use it or lose planning would be beneficial for many reasons, not least to simply make the statistics more reliable.

    1. Andrew

      Who was playing Gold with Sean Fitzpatrick weeks before the bank guarantee Helga?
      Who had the Galway Tent Helga? Who turned property speculation in to a national sport Helga?
      Helga, who do you vote for?

      Reply
    1. Kolmo

      No, just angry people, neither left or right, perplexed at the retarded nature of our property racket, poor planning and apparent god-like power of the vested interests in controlling the quality of life in Ireland..

      How about naming and shaming of firms involved in profiteering handsomely in evictions of fellow citizens from homes for their anti-social foreign based, tax-unburdened clients? Make it a poison chalice, but unfortunately there’s always a lizard low enough who is happy to do their bidding.

      Reply
      1. Rugbyfan

        agree on the naming and shaming Kolmo. Don’t think its appropriate to be posting photos of gaffs and getting the gander up for people.

        Reply
  1. Junkface

    Poxy Irish Politicians are the problem. Irelands Housing crisis is a systematic failure of Irish Governing and Croney Capitalism culture.

    Reply
    1. Andrew

      It is Irish politicians yes but it is the people who vote for them too.
      People want rising property prices, they do not care for the consequences of that.

      Reply
  2. phil

    Richard Bruton has dedicated his life to politics, why would he want a landbank? Thats the kinda thing business men do ….

    Reply
  3. hugh_mungus

    once you’re outside the Pale it’s essentially mad max territory, who in their right minds would live among the bog people?

    Reply
  4. bobsyerauntie

    If this is true, then it’s scandalous.
    However, it’s not surprising.
    The fact that it’s not surprising should disturb us all though..
    Bloody gombeens ..

    Reply

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