The tent at Sandford Close, Ranelagh, Dublin 6 this evening.

A man, in his 50s, was found unresponsive in the tent he was sleeping in earlier this afternoon.

The grim discovery was made at approximately 12:30 on Sandford Close, Ranelagh in south Dublin. The man had been sleeping in the area for quite some time.

It is understood that groundkeepers from the nearby Gonzaga College discovered the man unresponsive and raised the alarm.

Grim discovery Homeless man found unresponsive in tent yards from college in leafy Dublin suburb dies (Craig Farrell, The Irish Sun)

Pic Paul Sharp via Irish Sun

35 thoughts on “Another Death

  1. JIMMYJAMES

    On hearing the news, Eoghan is said to have reflected how much the hedgerow had grown since he was last there for a Leinster schools semi against Michaels.

    Reply
    1. martco

      ah now @JIMMYJAMES I’m sure Eoghan and his party are doing all they possibly can to end the homelessness & housing crises

      /s

      Reply
        1. Martco

          yes of course as always!
          I asked BS to cobble up a sarcasm font unfortunately didn’t happen but clampers recently pointed out to me and anyone else not camped on reddit all day that “/s” acts in place of such a concept.

          As for Eoghan Murphy and his party, well I’ve plenty of posts on here where I’ve expressed my opinion on the utter dichotomy that exists in giving a marble mouthed ex public schoolboy with an Arts degree with his clinic office in Ranelagh village the job of solving the housing crisis. He’s hardly Noel Browne now is he? Or the junior brother Coveney the yacht sailor before him?? It’s Yes Minister territory.

          The whole show around housing at all levels is strategy, design. When sadly a FG minister tells you that he or she is working hord to solve the housing crisis or the homelessness crisis or the issue of rough sleepers…children NOW BEING BORN INTO HOMELESSNESS…you are being lied to. It’s a duck and it’s quacking away in plain sight and it’s by design. If people want that to change you need to have a social orientated government not business focussed.

          Reply
          1. Martco

            it doesn’t have to be a binary thing @Twunt

            SOME level of social ethics approach are surely achieveable and better that no?

            over what we have now where it’s nearly “kill the poor” 100% business & macro economic obsession…keep the haves happy…

            I’m one of these so called squeezed middle types. I’ve worked since 18 uninterrupted so far…have a mortgage, car, wife, kids etc. BUT I’m not happy, I don’t have any more rights than that unfortunate person who died. I’m personally unhappy because I don’t want unfair social advantage, I don’t like to see a group of politicians espouse that unfairness because of some ideology that we can somehow all benefit from a trickle down…I was always taught to solve the harder problems first, the ones that matter.

            And FG, Mr Coveney, Mr. Murphy have no REAL investment in this problem.

  2. Steph Pinker

    Well, at least the Tánaiste got to issue a press-release before she *departed* of her ‘own volition’ from her position of power and cynicism, unlike this unfortunate man who didn’t even have a voice – maybe he didn’t get up early enough in the morning – or maybe, our so-called representatives just don’t care because it doesn’t affect them.

    Reply
  3. anne

    I only said to the boyfriend last night imagine being homeless out in that cold. I hate even going out to the bin.

    It has to be fixed..regardless of the causes – “bad behaviour”, or addiction or mental health problems or just falling on bad times like losing a job or a relationship breakdown.. lots of people are really not that far removed from ever becoming homeless.

    Reply
  4. Liam deliverance

    The poor fella, Godspeed. It’s a terrible shame of our times amongst many terrible shames. Like why are most of our politicians just so sh1t at most everything. As for homeless folk, they say hostels are dangerous, you or your stuff will be messed with or you will not be able to sleep from the stress of it so can they not post a Garda at the hostel to keep the peace. Mind your own business or sleep on the street.

    Reply
  5. Paddy at the Howth Summit

    So sad. The reasons for being homeless can be complex, but dying like that is just simply wrong. RIP.

    Reply
  6. Brother Barnabas

    Awful. I’d really like to be a fly on the wall when Leo et al. are given this news. Just curious to see how how little or means.

    Reply
    1. Sheik Yahbouti

      It means sod all to those people, and you know it. An inconvenient ripple in the PR stream, which can be overcome with more sympathy for poor old mistreated Frances. Maybe people stopped ‘encouraging’ this guy with soup and food. After all, such a ‘chaotic lifestyle CHOICE ‘ sort of demands a ‘tough love’ approach, don’tcha think? Meanwhile Fannins mourn the cancellation of the second order for incontinence pads to Kildare street – pensions (and Christmas hols are saved).

      Reply
      1. realPolithicks

        You’re right of course, they pay lip service to resolving this problem while in actual fact doing virtually nothing. They see homelessness as a political problem which needs to be managed as opposed to a human problem which is inflicting misery on thousands of their fellow citizens. The fact that Varadkar tried to pretend that it wasn’t an issue because the “statistics” versus other EU nations were favourable tells you all you need to know. Thats what homeless people are to someone like Varadkar, “statistics”.

        Reply
  7. Johnny Keenan

    This is really unsettling and upsetting for this poor man. May he rest in peace. When will his name be released I wonder. I dint think it’s fair to his 50 years to be described as ‘someone who lived rough’.

    Reply
    1. realPolithicks

      It should be unsettling and upsetting to everyone. I’m 55 years old and I can’t imagine what it would be like to be living like this poor man was, at this point in my life. RIP.

      Reply
  8. Catherine costelloe

    I dont understand ” complicated” when discussing homelessness. There are drug addicts, alcoholics, mental breakdowns, relationship breakdowns , penniless immigrants that are homeless. The majority will be jobless. Surely drug addicts are the most difficult to handle as withdrawal symptoms are horrendous. Their next fix is their priority. I believe the majority of the misfortunes should be housed to cure addictions be it drugs / alcohol and residential help centres would money better spent than hostels. The alcohol centre in Bruree has wonderful results for thousands re alcoholics. Every individual has a different problem and appropriate referral should be available. Rest in peace , poor man. You weren’t born to die homeless.

    Reply
    1. Sheik Yahbouti

      Daisy, we can be thankful we didn’t win the Rugby World Cup. Accommodation would have been at a premium. Every shitbag Hotel and hostel would be pressed into service. I dread to think of their ‘solution’ to what to do with the homeless in the meantime :-0

      Reply
  9. RidersOnTheStorm

    One would think that, when the poor man died within yards of Leinster House, they would be spurred into meaningful action, but no. We are led by donkeys whose priority is another year or so, when their overbloated pensions kick in.

    Reply
    1. Joe Small

      Are you so warped you think the Taoiseach will be happy to hear a homeless person is dead? Can’t we just say his policies aren’t good enough rather than sinking to your depths?

      Reply
  10. Rob_G

    Well, his death at least gives the Broasheet commentators something to to make political capital out of, so every cloud and all that…

    RIP to the poor man.

    Reply
      1. Rob_G

        This is exactly what is happening above. Maybe the poor man died of official neglect; maybe all the help in the world couldn’t have saved him. Given that we don’t know the circumstances surrounding his demise, I don’t think it is appropriate to use the man as political hobbyhorse.

        Reply
        1. Killian G

          “maybe all the help in the world couldn’t have saved him”

          Highly, highly, highly, highly, highly highly, highly unlikely. That’s the sort of utterance you usually hear from people who pretend to give a poo, but weren’t interested in offering any help at all.

          Reply
      2. Warden of the Snort

        He has a point, but oh what a weak one.

        I mean it’s far more important to him that he has a go at other broadsheet commenters, than extending his condolences. Just look at his comment and how it’s structured.

        Reply
  11. Johnny Keenan

    ‘Maybe all the help in the world couldn’t help him’

    Everyone can be helped if the right systems are put in place and the right people are put in place to make that system work.

    The HSE is a national disgrace. The housing system is a national disgrace, education/religion is a national disgrace.
    The reason these 3 institutions are national disgrace is because most of the money in the Irish economy is wrapped up here. Who is in charge of all that? The banks. The government hold this corrupt system together by refusing or tactically stalling to legislate change.

    Follow the money trail and you’ll get to the answer of everything that needs sorting out on this septic isle.

    If these institutions were being run by honest hard working people we wouldn’t need ‘all the help in the world’ Rob G.
    We would have a republic that would be an example for the rest of the world to follow.

    No one can tell me that 5 million people can’t change this country into something really special. The will has to be there.

    A few independent TD’s are changing the culture of Leinster House.
    Imagine what a government of TD’s could do for our country?

    Reply

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