Author Archives: Broadsheet

 

The fab six.

They blew in with the Mersey Beat.

Ian Whelan writes:

Legendary Irish Beat group The Cyclones – all still alive and (almost) kicking – play a rare show this Saturday in Greystones, County Wicklow.

This will be accompanied by a showing of the acclaimed Doris/Magee documentry “Night Of The Cyclones” (trailer above).

It all happens in The Hotspot in Greystones, November 4 at 9pm….

The Cyclones

This morning.

Grafton Street, Dublin 2.

Bewley’s oldest customers Denis Shields, 86, and Eileen Brennan, undisclosed age, are the first to walk through the doors of the iconic café after a multi-million-euro refurbishment.

Paddy Campbell of Bewley’s (pic 2) promise regulars will find elements of the original café have been carefully restored including the Harry Clarke windows, the banquettes and open fireplaces “as well as an open-concept bakery so customers can see old favourites such as the Sticky Buns being crafted by some of Europe’s finest pastry chefs and bakers”.

Fight!

Leon Farrell/Photocall Ireland

From top: UNCAT vice-chair Felice Gaer; Martin McAleese; Irish Examiner journalist Conall Ó Fátharta and Boston College professor James Smith

Readers may recall how the McAleese Inquiry into Magalene laundries – which was chaired by Martin McAleese – was published on Tuesday, February 5, 2013.

It found no evidence existed to suggest abuse took place in the laundries.

Readers may also recall how, in July, the UN Committee Against Torture (UNCAT) in Geneva criticised the Government and said, in fact, UNCAT had received a “great deal of evidence that there has indeed been abuse”.

At that time, Rapporteur Felice Gaer said it was “quite troubling that the interdepartmental committee destroyed its copies of evidence from religious congregations that ran these laundries and will not provide public with information. What is preventing the Government providing public access to the archive?

Ms Gaer also said the committee had received information about the archives of the Diocese of Galway which was not accessible.

She said:

This individual also brought Senator McAleese’s office’s attention to the existence of these files. He provided the senator with a summary of the materials, but says they were not accurately reflected in the McAleese Report.

“The files reportedly document physical abuse, and the Galway Magdalene’s practice of calling the Irish police to prevent family members from removing women from the institutions.

Further to this.

Today.

In The Irish Examiner, Conall Ó Fátharta reports that the person who gave this information to UNCAT, in November 2013, was Professor James Smith, of Boston College.

He reports UNCAT was also informed that the documentation outlined how there were 107 women who were in the Galway Magdalene Laundry in December 1952.

It was also told of the involvement of the bishop of Galway in the operations and financial dealings of the Sisters of Mercy Galway Magdalene.

This was one of two laundries for which, according to the McAleese Report, no records survive.

Before he accessed the archive in May 2012, Professor Smith signed an agreement not to publish or reproduce any material, without the permission of the Galway Diocesan archive.

But after accessing it, he went on to compile a list of relevant files and prepared a 10-page summary of their contents for Dr McAleese, on May 10, 2012.

Mr Ó Fátharta reports that, according to minutes obtained by him, the McAleese committee did visit the archive and that it was deemed “useful”.

But, when the McAleese Report came out the following year, in February 2013, Prof Smith found that it did not adequately reflect the material he had seen and he subsequently sought to publish the material he had seen.

He was told to send his article to the Galway Diocesan Trustees for approval.

Mr Ó Fátharta reports:

“Prof Smith was also assisting an elderly Magdalene survivor in a personal capacity, as the Department of Justice’s Magdalene Implementation team was having difficulty determining her duration of stay at the Galway Magdalene Laundry, for the purpose of paying her lump-sum compensation. The woman had said she escaped the laundry in early December 1951, but there was no way to document this as fact.

On May 14, 2014, Prof Smith informed the department of the list of 107 women and said that while the list did not confirm her date of exit, it did confirm she was not resident in the Laundry in December 1952.

Prof Smith said he wanted to help the survivor, but that he had also signed an archival users agreement with the diocese of Galway not to “quote from, refer to, or reproduce’ material from the archive without permission”. The department responded by asking Prof Smith to ask the diocese for permission to share the document, but the academic informed it that it should apply directly to the diocese for a copy.

Two weeks later, on May 27, Prof Smith received a letter from the Galway diocesan archive advising him that he had “retained personal data” and that “it is now incumbent upon you, if the information is in fact true, to destroy, erase, or return such data to the data controller”. He was then informed that the archive was now “embargoed”.

“Also, please note that permission has not been given by the diocese, or its agents, to you to publish, or otherwise reproduce, the material.”

In addition, Mr Ó Fátharta reports:

The Irish Examiner put a series of questions to the Department of Justice on Prof’s Smith’s claims and the McAleese committee’s treatment of the Galway diocesan archive. It declined to answer any of them, stating that the committee “no longer exists and is, therefore, not in a position to respond to specific queries”.

Four years on, questions continue to be asked of report into Magdalene Laundries (Conall Ó Fátharta, Irish Examiner)

Previously: The Magdalene Report: A Conclusion 

Ibrahim Halawa after his arrival in Dublin Airport last week

RTE writes:

“Ibrahim Halawa will appear on The Late Late Show on Friday night. He will be discussing his four years spent in an Egyptian jail awaiting trial, relating to a protest in Cairo, before his eventual acquittal on all charges; what it was like to finally be free to return to Ireland and what he intends on doing next.

“He joins Conor McGregor on the line-up for this week’s Late Late Show – the full line-up will be revealed tomorrow.”

Previously: Ibrahim Home

This morning.

Heuston Station, Dublin.

Richard Smith (above centre) on holiday from USA walks past train drivers and rail workers as they begin a 24-hour strike, the first of five that will shut down Dart, commuter, and Intercity rail services in the run up to Christmas.

Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie

Meanwhile…

Heuston Station, Dublin

From left: Greg Ennis of SIPTU and General Secretary of the National Bus and Rail Union (NBRU) Dermot O’Leary join the picket

The Iarnród Éireann Trade Union Group have written to the Group Secretary of CIE saying it is “long since passed time that leadership was provided” to end the dispute.

Rail unions write to CIE calling for pay proposal (RTÉ)

Rollingnews

Alternatively…

FIGHT!

No Fixed Abode is a group exhibition of donated homeless-themed works by artists, illustrators, photographers and sculptures in aid of the Peter McVerry Trust.

Launching at 6pm in the Copper House, Saint Kevins Cottages, Synge Street, Dublin 8.

No Fixed Abode runs until Friday, December 22 (Monday – Friday 10am – 5pm).

No Fixed Abode (Facebook)

Earlier: Another Record

In the Name of Peace: John Hume in America

Narrated by Liam Neeson with an original musical score by Bill Whelan.

This 90-minute documentary by Maurice Fitzpatrick tells of how John Hume cultivated the support of a succession of US presidents to help forge peace in Northern Ireland and why Bill Clinton (top right) called him the ‘Martin Luther King of Northern Ireland politics”.

This November 17, In the Name of Peace: John Hume in America will be released in select IMC Cinemas nationwide (Dublin Savoy, IMC Tallaght, IMC Santry, IMC Dun Laoghaire, IMC Athlone, IMC Carlow, IMC Dundalk, IMC Galway, IMC Ballymena, IMC Enniskillen and IMC Omagh).

Tickets here

Thanks Christina and Joanne

Last night.

Grand Canal Dock, Dublin 2

Members of the Dublin Cycling Campaign, including Alice Beuchat (pic 6) and Tomas O Dowd and Irene Walsh (pic 2) handout free mini-bike lights to cyclists.

FIGHT!

Sam Boal/Rollingnews

Meanwhile…

Anthony Flynn, of Inner City Helping Homeless, writes:

Crisis intervention is now required.

Meanwhile…