Author Archives: Karl Monaghan

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The guys in Showoff have done the right thing and released an Android version of their Ice Cream Finder app we featured a couple of weeks ago.

It’s every bit as good as the iOS version but with extra amusement since it runs on an operating system code named Ice Cream Sandwich.

Off the back of the apps, they’ve partnered with the Irish Times to find the best 99 in Ireland. Not bad for an app one commenter declared had no hope of taking off.

The app is available now on the Google Play Store (as well as the iOS version on the Apple App Store).

Do you have an Irish app (especially an Android one)? Let us know: Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.

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With World Cup fever in full swing, thoughts will soon turn to attempting to organise a few games of 5-a-side.

Then you remember trying to sort it all out is like herding cats into a small bag and you forget all about it.

That’s where Scaboodle comes in with their event management apps.

With the apps you can invite friends, sort out a time and place and hopefully get to kick a ball around. Afterwards you can dissect it all and share all your photos.

If you’re not interested in organising your own, you can also search through other open events to something that piques your interest.

It’s not just for the sportsball fans as it’s flexible enough for any sort of event.

Everything from creating the event to posting afterwards is quick and easy. The little cartoons throughout add a nice bit of personality to what could otherwise be a dry process.

The app is available now on the Apple App StoreGoogle Play and the Windows Phone Store for free.

Do you have an Irish app (especially an Android one)? Let us know: Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.

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One of the more interesting things to come out of yesterday’s keynote to Google I/O was Cardboard.

The plain name hides a  nifty concept – using your Android phone, a bit of cardboard and a couple of easily-ish obtainable parts, you can make your own Oculus Rift without the $350 price tag.

If you want to watch the whole keynote, it’s on YouTube in all its 3 hour glory (the first 27 minutes are silent).

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It’s all about mobile these days – we’re spending up to 3 hours a day consumed by our slabs of intelligent glass.

For all that, we’re a fickle bunch and it’s hard to keep us engaged and happy with an app when it’s so easy to discard them like a used tissue.

That’s where Somaries Quintana from Converser comes in

“In a nutshell, we are all about helping mobile focused businesses create smarter marketing for their mobile apps. Instead of the going for ‘spray and pray’ method of sending everyone a one size fits all message, we focus on bringing the personal element back into mobile marketing by empowering you with the ability to send the right message to the right app user at the right time.

“…We give you valuable insights into your mobile app users to help you determine what gets them ticking so you can send targeted, interactive in-app notifications. These help you boost engagement, retention and loyalty so you can make a meaningful impact on your mobile app’s ROI. The reason we call them interactive in-app notifications is because instead of appearing like a banner ad on the screen, you can actually guide your mobile app users to complete any call to action you like with just the tap of a button.”

From a development perspective, it was easy for me to integrate it all into an upcoming version of the Broadsheet apps and support from the the guys was top notch.

Do you have an Irish start-up? Get in touch broadsheet@broadsheet.ie.

No cash, favours, etc. were given for this post. Full disclosure: Karl does an Apple-centric podcast with Oisin, one of the co-founders.

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Originally released in 2010, VVVVVV from Terry Cavanagh is a classic of the simple play, fiendishly difficult to master genre.

This month saw the release of the game on both iOS and Android

The core conceit of the game is rather than being able to jump, you can flip the direction of gravity. And with that ability, you need to navigate through a space station and find the other members of your ‘crew’.

There’s a great sense of achievement when you manage to navigate past a set of spikes and aliens by deftly switching literally what way is up.

If you want to have a go without downloading anything, there’s an onliine demo here.

The game is available now on the Apple App Store for €2.69, on the Google Play Store for €2.45 and is currently at half price on Steam for Windows and Mac at €2.49.

Do you have an Irish app (especially an Android one)? Let us know: Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.

H/T LonelyBeastApps

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When the iPhone was first released, one of the things I wished you could do out of the box was the ability to attach a blob of information about about a place for others to discover.

Launched last month, iTagged is the latest app to tackle the problem.  It allows you to attach notes, picture and video to any place you want for OTHERS TO DISCOVER.

iTagged will let you know when you’re near a point of interest or you can draw on a map to reveal all the tags within a given area. You can even use their augmented reality functionality to scan around you to see exactly where people have left their little titbits of information.

The app is available now on the Apple App Store

Do you have an Irish app (especially an Android one)? Let us know: Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.

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Shane Byrne of Showoff.ie writes:

Everyone heard about Catherine Noone with her ice cream van problems this morning so we said “Come on, like 99’s are what Irish Summer’s are all about!”

With that in mind, they’ve launched 99 – Ice Cream Finder. The app does one thing and does it well – it tells you on a hot day like today where the best 99 is available nearest to you.

The app is available now on the Apple App Store and an Android version is a possibility if there is demand foNOMNOMNOMNOM on the Google Play Store.

*slurp*

Do you have an Irish app (especially an Android one)? Let us know: Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.

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Russian red top Express Gazeta‘s predictions on how Europe will look in 2035, unearthed by io9.

As well as a united Ireland, they’re betting Scotland leaving the UK will spur on an independent Basque country and Catalonia among others.

The author admits though (as translated by Google):

“Such territorial changes are possible only when the coincidence huge number of factors. However, the probability that in 2035 the political map of Europe will be tailored for this model is quite high…”

What Europe Will Look Like In 2035 If Russian Tabloids Have Their Way (io9)

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The grounds of the former Bon Secours mother and baby home in Tuam, Co. Galway where it’s believed 796 infants may have been buried in a mass grave. Middle: Catherine Corless and, above, today’s coverage in the irish Times.

“Corless writes in her article about hearing of boys who “came upon a sort of crypt in the ground, and on peering in they saw several small skulls. I’m told they ran for their lives and relayed their find to their parents.”

From Rosita Boland’s Tuam mother and baby home: the trouble with the septic tank story piece in today’s Irish Times and  picked up by a number of Catholic websites today.

From the accompanying video Catherine Corless says:

So it was only in my research when I was talking to people in the area, they said ‘Do you know there’s a little graveyard at the back?’  The older residents in the area – now, before these new houses went up – they had the story that two little boys were playing in the area back in the early 70s/late 60s and they came across a huge hollow in the ground. Then they went further and saw there was a slab – a few slabs going across this hollow and so the lads tried to peer in to see what was in there, and they got some stones and broke open more. They said when they cracked open the slab – he said he was just doing this – it was full, full to the brim with skulls and bones. I said ‘Were they big or small?’ ‘Oh’, he said ‘they were little ones, all little ones’ he said.

 

 

 

The full transcript of the video via Paul Moloney:

Catherine Corless: “I started out to do the history of the nuns and the children who went there and I wasn’t expecting the stories that came up. Because we never really knew the home babies as we called them. I kind of remember them going to school in the lower classes. I do remember that they came down in rows, down a double-row down to school. Everybody remembers the sound of the boots because they made a rattle when they came down because the girls and boys wore these hob-nail boots, big black hob-nail boots, summer and winter, and I do remember they were treated that little bit different than the rest of us. We always knew not to play with them and to keep away. This whole area was enclosed with an eight-foot wall right around an acre perimeter, and very few people could see in or out. If you were in there you couldn’t see what was going on in the outside word. A car would come and drop off a mother I suppose and she would go in and once they went in there they just didn’t see outside again until they left.

So it was only in my research when I was talking to people in the area, they said ‘Do you know there’s a little graveyard at the back?’ The older residents in the area – now, before these new houses went up – they had the story that two little boys were playing in the area back in the early 70s/late 60s and they came across a huge hollow in the ground. Then they went further and saw there was a slab – a few slabs going across this hollow and so the lads tried to peer in to see what was in there, and they got some stones and broke open more. They said when they cracked open the slab – he said he was just doing this – it was full, full to the brim with skulls and bones. I said ‘Were they big or small?’ ‘Oh’, he said ‘they were little ones, all little ones’ he said.

Rosita Boland?: “And do you believe him?”

Corless: “Well, it’s not just the boys talking, it’s from other people around the area if you talk to them. They say that a few people came to see what the fuss was about. Someone called the parish priest to come up and to look at the area and to bless it. It’s only in the last month or so that I found out that these boys – now men – were still around. I didn’t have their names until about a month ago.

Boland: “Do you believe that there are all of the children in that grave, do you think that that is possible?”

Corless: “I think it’s quite possible going from the boys’ explanation that it was full to the brim of bones. But still how children at the time, does it matter if it’s 500, 600? If there isn’t a full 796? 10 children in a septic tank? 20? Isn’t that horrific? Is it the numbers that makes it horrific?

Boland: “Would you welcome excavation in that spot?”

Corless: “I would welcome the truth, always, always. The evidence strongly suggests excavation is the only way, if anyone wants to do that. That wasn’t our intention, our intention was to name the children, have them remembered, put up a plaque. I’m thinking of the other mother and baby homes in Ireland, I’m thinking of the groups that are out there, desperately trying as we were, struggling to have children remembered. And if this investigation helps and pushes it forward, I would welcome it. It’s justice, justice to children, justice to the people who gave birth there.”

(Photocall Ireland)

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