Author Archives: Karl Monaghan

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When the iPhone was first released, one of the things I wished you could do out of the box was the ability to attach a blob of information about about a place for others to discover.

Launched last month, iTagged is the latest app to tackle the problem.  It allows you to attach notes, picture and video to any place you want for OTHERS TO DISCOVER.

iTagged will let you know when you’re near a point of interest or you can draw on a map to reveal all the tags within a given area. You can even use their augmented reality functionality to scan around you to see exactly where people have left their little titbits of information.

The app is available now on the Apple App Store

Do you have an Irish app (especially an Android one)? Let us know: Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.

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Shane Byrne of Showoff.ie writes:

Everyone heard about Catherine Noone with her ice cream van problems this morning so we said “Come on, like 99’s are what Irish Summer’s are all about!”

With that in mind, they’ve launched 99 – Ice Cream Finder. The app does one thing and does it well – it tells you on a hot day like today where the best 99 is available nearest to you.

The app is available now on the Apple App Store and an Android version is a possibility if there is demand foNOMNOMNOMNOM on the Google Play Store.

*slurp*

Do you have an Irish app (especially an Android one)? Let us know: Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.

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Russian red top Express Gazeta‘s predictions on how Europe will look in 2035, unearthed by io9.

As well as a united Ireland, they’re betting Scotland leaving the UK will spur on an independent Basque country and Catalonia among others.

The author admits though (as translated by Google):

“Such territorial changes are possible only when the coincidence huge number of factors. However, the probability that in 2035 the political map of Europe will be tailored for this model is quite high…”

What Europe Will Look Like In 2035 If Russian Tabloids Have Their Way (io9)

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The grounds of the former Bon Secours mother and baby home in Tuam, Co. Galway where it’s believed 796 infants may have been buried in a mass grave. Middle: Catherine Corless and, above, today’s coverage in the irish Times.

“Corless writes in her article about hearing of boys who “came upon a sort of crypt in the ground, and on peering in they saw several small skulls. I’m told they ran for their lives and relayed their find to their parents.”

From Rosita Boland’s Tuam mother and baby home: the trouble with the septic tank story piece in today’s Irish Times and  picked up by a number of Catholic websites today.

From the accompanying video Catherine Corless says:

So it was only in my research when I was talking to people in the area, they said ‘Do you know there’s a little graveyard at the back?’  The older residents in the area – now, before these new houses went up – they had the story that two little boys were playing in the area back in the early 70s/late 60s and they came across a huge hollow in the ground. Then they went further and saw there was a slab – a few slabs going across this hollow and so the lads tried to peer in to see what was in there, and they got some stones and broke open more. They said when they cracked open the slab – he said he was just doing this – it was full, full to the brim with skulls and bones. I said ‘Were they big or small?’ ‘Oh’, he said ‘they were little ones, all little ones’ he said.

 

 

 

The full transcript of the video via Paul Moloney:

Catherine Corless: “I started out to do the history of the nuns and the children who went there and I wasn’t expecting the stories that came up. Because we never really knew the home babies as we called them. I kind of remember them going to school in the lower classes. I do remember that they came down in rows, down a double-row down to school. Everybody remembers the sound of the boots because they made a rattle when they came down because the girls and boys wore these hob-nail boots, big black hob-nail boots, summer and winter, and I do remember they were treated that little bit different than the rest of us. We always knew not to play with them and to keep away. This whole area was enclosed with an eight-foot wall right around an acre perimeter, and very few people could see in or out. If you were in there you couldn’t see what was going on in the outside word. A car would come and drop off a mother I suppose and she would go in and once they went in there they just didn’t see outside again until they left.

So it was only in my research when I was talking to people in the area, they said ‘Do you know there’s a little graveyard at the back?’ The older residents in the area – now, before these new houses went up – they had the story that two little boys were playing in the area back in the early 70s/late 60s and they came across a huge hollow in the ground. Then they went further and saw there was a slab – a few slabs going across this hollow and so the lads tried to peer in to see what was in there, and they got some stones and broke open more. They said when they cracked open the slab – he said he was just doing this – it was full, full to the brim with skulls and bones. I said ‘Were they big or small?’ ‘Oh’, he said ‘they were little ones, all little ones’ he said.

Rosita Boland?: “And do you believe him?”

Corless: “Well, it’s not just the boys talking, it’s from other people around the area if you talk to them. They say that a few people came to see what the fuss was about. Someone called the parish priest to come up and to look at the area and to bless it. It’s only in the last month or so that I found out that these boys – now men – were still around. I didn’t have their names until about a month ago.

Boland: “Do you believe that there are all of the children in that grave, do you think that that is possible?”

Corless: “I think it’s quite possible going from the boys’ explanation that it was full to the brim of bones. But still how children at the time, does it matter if it’s 500, 600? If there isn’t a full 796? 10 children in a septic tank? 20? Isn’t that horrific? Is it the numbers that makes it horrific?

Boland: “Would you welcome excavation in that spot?”

Corless: “I would welcome the truth, always, always. The evidence strongly suggests excavation is the only way, if anyone wants to do that. That wasn’t our intention, our intention was to name the children, have them remembered, put up a plaque. I’m thinking of the other mother and baby homes in Ireland, I’m thinking of the groups that are out there, desperately trying as we were, struggling to have children remembered. And if this investigation helps and pushes it forward, I would welcome it. It’s justice, justice to children, justice to the people who gave birth there.”

(Photocall Ireland)

Update:

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Calvin & Hobbes creator Bill Watterson’s collaboraton with Stephan Pastis for his strip Pearls Before Swine - the famously reclusive artist’s first published comic work since Calvin & Hobbes finished (the only other piece is his poster for an upcoming documentary Stripped).

The collaboration, which Pastis describes as “A glimpse of Bigfoot“, was only revealed with the publication of the 3rd strip today.

Bill Watterson’s Strips For Pearls Before Swine (Bleeding Cool)

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LEGO Ideas (formerly Cuusoo) user ‘ysomt’ was inspired by the Avengers film to realise the Helicarrier in LEGO form.

At 217 x 115 cm and using nearly 23,0000 bricks this beast of a model is fantastic, if a little impractical to compile as a set.

Harrumph.

There’s plenty more pictures on the project page.

Cool Stuff: 22,000-Piece Avengers Lego Helicarrier Design

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Created by Ranga Vadhineni, Localmint is a site and companion iOS app that lets you find out opening times of shops around you.

It doesn’t sound like something that would be hard to to find using Google, but it surprisingly IS especially when you’re in a hurry.

It’s one of those apps that you’ll have on your phone, forgotten about until the last can is drunk and you need to get to the closest shop still open.

Ranga and his co-founder Oisin Ryan are currently part of the current batch of start ups in the NDRC Launchpad programme and are working to bring their app to the UK and Australia.

The app is available now on the Apple App Store and an Android version is in the pipeline to be released in July.

Do you have an Irish app? Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.

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After teasing everyone with a mostly obscured shot of the new Batmobile from his upcoming Batman vs Superman film, Zack Snyder delivered today with a better shot along with (what we assume is) a bonus Ben Affleck in costume.

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Ten-year-old Niall Kehoe [above] released his first game last week, Kehoes Crazy War of the Worlds which he created using Game Salad.

Dermot Daly of Tapadoo (who Niall got in touch with for some advice) says:

[Niall] e-mailed us out of the blue to help him upload his app to the store.

His problems were in the process of submission – getting certificates, bundling the app correctly and so forth. Problems that any developer could run into.  He was quite a dab hand at getting around the keyboard; seemed super-smart.

It’s great to see that people as young as 10 show an interest in software development. I started young myself, and always like to see movements like App Camp for Girls and Coder Dojo. Meeting enthusiastic young developers tells me that the future of software is in safe hands.

It’s fantastic to see someone so young be motivated enough to develop skills still not taught in schools despite all the lip service given to the Smart/Knowledge Economy given by politicians.

Kehoes Crazy War of the Worlds available on the Apple app store now. Why don’t you download and review it to give this budding young developer some encouragement?

Do you have an Irish app? Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pints were given for this post. We have some guidelines on submissions.