Category Archives: Video

cycling

A new Cycling With… profile featuring cycle-newbie Dr. Madeleine Lyes who, sez Paddy Cahill:

…started cycling so she could enjoy trips with her boyfriend but she soon saw the potential for cycling to transform Dublin, and other cities, for the better. We went for a cycle with Madeleine and she told us the lessons she has learned about cycling, her thoughts on recent changes in attitudes to urbanism in Dublin, and about her project, an urban forum in Dublin called City Intersections.

Previously: Cycling With Fergal

lytro-illum-3lytro

The Illum (€1089 on pre-order) from Lytro – launched this week  – is a light field or ‘plenoptic’ camera that captures all the light in a given scene, giving all manner of ’3D’ options, like  selecting the focal points of a picture after you’ve taken it.

They’ve been mucking about with the technology since the summer of 2011 and developed a predecessor to the current model back in 2012.

This one however, has a 40 (as opposed to 11) megaray sensor and is targeted at ‘creative professionals’ (you know who you are.)

The technology is also the focus of an app by Lytro that allows 3D picture viewing, not to mention ‘light field movie capture’ enabling focus switching within an animation.

MORE: Lytro’s new Illum camera brings light-field tech to pros (and it could change photos forever) (Venture Beat)

(H/T: John Gallen)

hands

Jenny May Finn writes:

I am a video artist from Dublin and I’ve finally released the first video in my new project on hands. I am doing a series of video Hand Portraits. This first one is of “The Sound Editor” who sits in a suite and edits sounds on the TV shows lots of us watch every day. I adore hand mannerisms and this little series will hopefully show us some of the quirks and lovely hand gestures us individuals have without even realising it.

starshade starshade2

A wise man once said something like ‘There is life on other planets, only not to see’.

It might have been Aidan Walsh. And how right he was.

It’s all down to the blinding glow of stars, which obliterates the ability of distant viewers to see the planets orbiting them.

In this TED talk, Princeton University astronomer Jeremy Kasdin explains a new  technology which may change all that: the Starshade – a flower petal-shaped screen that allows a telescope (located up to 50,000km from said Starshade) to photograph previously invisible planets trillions of kilometers away.

(Thanks Helvick)

laughingsquid