Tag Archives: Abortion

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This afternoon.

Central Bank, Dublin 2

Pro-life supporters, iocluding above from left: Emma Maloney, Rossa and Mary Kenny, launch the ‘Love Both’ project highlighting “all that’s positive about the Eighth Amendment“.

*deep breath*

FIGHT!

The Love Both Project (Facebook)

Meanwhile…

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Amanda Mellet and her husband James Burke

The Government has offered €30,000 in compensation to Amanda Mellet, the woman who successfully made a complaint to the United Nations about Ireland’s abortion laws.

…Ms Mellet was in her 21st week of pregnancy in November 2011 when she learned her foetus had congenital heart defects and would die in the uterus or shortly after birth…

The Rotunda Hospital, where Ms Mellet received her scan, acted in accordance with existing laws by informing her of her options, namely, to carry to term or to “travel”.

…The offer were made to Ms Mellet in a meeting with Minister for Health Simon Harris Tuesday night…just one week before a deadline imposed by the UN Human Rights Committee on Ireland

Woman harmed by abortion ban offered €30,000 (Pat Leahy, Irish Times)

Previously: ‘The Ashes Were Unexpectedly Delivered To Her Three Weeks Later By Courier’

Rollingnews

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Taking the trip to Liverpool today are a couple dealing with grief, and the extra trauma of having to fly to the UK for treatment, following the diagnosis of a fatal foetal abnormality.

The couple, who also have a disabled child, are documenting their trip on Twitter and Snapchat.

Writes the couple’s husband:

This Thursday, the 10th of November, we will travel to the UK from Ireland to have a termination. This is not by choice. Three months ago, after many attempts, we were overjoyed at the discovery we were successful.

Our first child was born with a genetic condition that meant we spent many months in hospital and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Although there is a risk any future children may carry the same condition we decided it was a risk worth taking.

At our first pre-natal appointment, we were offered a genetic screening test. Although it does not screen for the condition that affects our first child, it will for others that may inhibit the baby’s chance of survival. Of course we agreed to a simple blood test, after all the heartbeat now visible was strong and all markers pointed to a healthy pregnancy. Then we got the call that nothing can prepare you for.

A fatal foetal abnormality was discovered. We had never heard of Edwards’ syndrome before but we were told that even if carried to full term the period of life would be counted in the minutes and hours after birth. It is a crushing sentence for any person to hear, let alone for my wife who has had to give up her career to become a full-time carer for our little boy.

We went back for more tests and got confirmation. We should be telling our friends and relatives about our joyous news at just over 12 weeks; instead we are now past the point of being able to go to a hospital in the UK so we had to make arrangements to visit a clinic.

Traumatic in its own right, we also have to get someone to mind our child who requires constant monitoring throughout the day or his condition can cause him to slip into a coma and his brain can basically shut down. A lot of responsibility for us, even more putting it on someone else’s shoulders.

(Despite) what should be a simple procedure that could be carried out 20 minutes from home, in a risk-free environment, we are being forced to travel to the UK, leaving our child behind and the risks that involves to do the most humane thing possible to a baby that will never survive. That’s why we are going to document our experience from start to finish on Thursday.

We hope that this may enlighten those who do not want to listen or even allow the people of this country to decide for themselves. Our Government has continually kicked the can down the road and we, the people, must decide if we can allow this to happen. We hope that by documenting our experience it may help those that may have been through something similar or may be unfortunate enough to do so in the future.

Please share and check back on Thursday morning for updates throughout the day.

Twitter – @itstimetorepeal
Snapchat – itstimetorepeal

Heartbroken & Punished

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Abortion protests in Dublin in 1992 during the X Case

Paul Cullen writing (In the Irish Times) about the increasingly inevitable repeal of the Eighth Amendment, opines that:

“…discussion is being dominated by the strident voices on the two ends of the spectrum, each group deeply attached to absolutist views on the subject”.

This all-too-common refrain suggests a false equivalence: that those who actively oppose abortion and those who actively support its availability are direct polar opposites – “absolutist views” – on a finite spectrum.

The usual conclusion of this question-begging cliché is that the most desirable or moral position may, or even must be some nebulous midpoint on the scale – a supposed “moderate centre ground” or the like.

This is the kind of fallacy that might lead one to argue that since some people are for slavery and some against, a little slavery is surely best.

Further, the anti-abortion position can be defined with some considerable measure of confident objectivity as absolutist or extreme by reference to clinically verifiable best medical practice, international human rights’ norms and opinion polling. (Support for an all-out abortion ban has hovered around 10 per cent in recent Irish polls).

The same cannot be said of the pro-choice position. It is therefore not good enough to suggest, by implying a false dichotomy, that since the anti-abortion position is absolutist, so too, ipso facto, is the pro-choice position.

John Cale,
Cork Street,
Dublin 8

‘Strident Voices In Abortion Debate (Irish Times Letters)

Has the intolerance of the 1980s pro-life brigade been transplanted to the Repeal debate? (Paul Cullen, Irish Times, November 1, 2016)

Rollingnews

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Protesters at a pro-choice rally in Dublin last year

Una Mullally, in The Guardian, writes:

The movement to repeal the 8th is growing, especially since the equal marriage referendum last year inspired a generation of young Irish people. In the days after that referendum, the question that Irish people hear repeatedly from abroad was raised: how can Ireland have gay marriage and not abortion? It’s one that can only be answered by acknowledging that misogyny in Ireland runs even deeper than homophobia.

What the equal marriage referendum taught us was that change comes from the bottom up. And we don’t just need one voice advocating for change, but many. The recent March for Choice in Dublin was replicated in cities around the world, with tens of thousands of people turning out to demand reproductive rights.

…Women are now telling their abortion stories in great numbers for the first time, and as we learned during the equal marriage referendum campaign, you can’t beat real-life experiences with abstract arguments.

Successive Irish governments haven’t listened to their female citizens. But what Irish governments really dislike is being embarrassed from abroad. As a nation, we are insecure, obsessed with our identity and what people think of us. So if politicians don’t have the guts to tackle this issue then they need to be shamed into action.

Solidarity matters because the extended hand often feels so much warmer than your own. The idea that people you don’t even know care about you is important. It bolsters you. And while solidarity from outside Ireland exists in pockets, we now need it from Britain en masse.

British people need to stomp on the streets and on the floors of parliament to help shame our government. British people should especially demand that women in Northern Ireland have the same reproductive rights as in England, Scotland, and Wales, and that those rights be extended to women on the Isle of Man too.

A strip of sea separates us, but we are just like you. We watch EastEnders, shop in Topshop, cry at Bake Off and drink gin. Your football teams are our football teams. We don’t earn enough and are sick of the rain. We are not “other”.

Irish women need British help to change our abortion laws (The Guardian)

Earlier: Free Tomorrow?

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Pro-choice protest Warsaw, Poland on Monday

Polish politicians have withdrawn draft legislation that would introduce a near-total ban on abortion, in a hastily arranged vote that marks the first major domestic setback for the ruling conservatives and follows massive street protests.

Up to 100,000 women dressed in black protested throughout Poland on Monday against plans to tighten the country’s already restrictive abortion rules.

Right-wing and liberal parliamentarians in the 450-member lower house joined forces to vote 352 against 58 to reject the controversial bill, with 18 abstentions.

Poland rejects stricter abortion laws (RTÉ)

Pic: AP

Thanks Nelly Bergman

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In Poland.

BBC reports:

Women in Poland have gone on strike in protest against proposals for a total ban on abortion.

They marched through the streets wearing black as a sign of mourning for their reproductive rights.

Women who oppose the ban are staying away from work and school and refusing to do domestic chores, in a protest inspired by a women’s strike in Iceland in 1975.

Anti-abortion protests are being held around the country too.

Women took to the streets of the capital city, Warsaw, in a pro-choice march on what they are calling “Black Monday”.

Further to this…

People who wish to express their solidarity with women in Poland are invited to bring a candle to the Polish consulate on Eden Quay this evening between 5.30 to 7pm.

Dublin – Solidarity with Polish women on strike (Facebook)

Black Monday: Women in Poland go on strike against abortion ban (BBC)

UPDATE:

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Lenny Abrahamson writes:

Huge protests happening in Poland against a full scale attack on women’s rights. They are asking for support from abroad…