Tag Archives: Bressie

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Yesterday

The Pavee Point Traveller and Roma Centre, North Great Charles Street Dublin 1

John Connors, Christy Moore and Bressie helped launch a position paper on Traveller Men’s Health. Research shows that men in the Travelling community suffer more from depression, low self-esteem and discrimination.

The Pavee Point organisation wants a national strategy to address the suicide rate among the male Travelling community, which is almost seven times the national average.

Research published a decade ago showed Traveller men’s lives were 15 years shorter that the overall male population in Ireland. Pavee Point says there is nothing to suggest that has changed.

Call for strategy to address male Traveller mental health (RTÉ)

Meanwhile….

The Traveller advocacy group Pavee Point has welcomed the news that Taoiseach Enda Kenny has resolved to support the recognition of Traveller ethnicity.

Mr Kenny said on Wednesday that the Government would begin taking steps towards the recognition of Traveller ethnicity in the new year.

The Taoiseach said he had asked Minister of State at the Department of Justice David Stanton to prepare a report for the social affairs committee on the question of recognising Traveller ethnicity. The report is expected in a few weeks.

In fairness.

Pavee Point welcomes recognition of Traveller ethnicity (irish Times)

Rollingnews

Screen-Shot-2016-01-21-at-11.14.42fiona

Niall Breslin, aka Bressie, before the Joint Committee on Health and Children in January

Fiona Kennedy, who has clinical depression and borderline personality disorder, yesterday wrote the following on the Facebook page of her Sunny Spells & Scattered Showers blog:

I AM SICK OF HEARING ABOUT BRESSIE AND JIM BREEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! They aren’t actually the only people in the entire country who understand mental health issues. Also, as an aside, depression isn’t the only mental health issue that affects people, and it’s not just young people who experience difficulties either. Despite what the media may think.

There. I said it.

(I’ve had a very long day, I’m very tired and my patience threshold is below zero)

Later, Fiona wrote:

That was an hour ago. I’m even more tired now, but having driven in and out of town to collect Hubby, I’m also wired, and I’ve had time to think.

On reflection, there is a whole lot more going on than simply being pissed off at two people who are doing one of the most crucial thing that needs doing to get the ball rolling on changing our mental health services – talking. Raising awareness. Letting people know that asking for help is ok.

But that’s where I hit a pitfall, and I think that’s at least part of where my frustration is coming from. It’s not what Bressie and Jim Breen are doing that’s the issue, it’s the media portrayal of it.

Both of them are talking about what they know, and they are both authentic, articulate, inspiring speakers. But what they know is a small piece of the puzzle.

The media (and this is all very much just my own opinion) can’t or won’t see beyond that. Mental illness isn’t just depression and suicide, in as much as physical illness isn’t just cancer. There are such a broad range of issues, and within that range, hugely varying degrees of severity and need. Every single person is different.

We could also be forgiven for thinking that difficulties only arise with the under 25s. Again, I’m not discounting the value of the work that’s being done here, god knows if I’d had more awareness when I was younger then things might have turned out very differently for me.

We absolutely need to get to kids when they’re in school, we absolutely need to work on breaking down the stigma around mental illness. I would love to think that this whole palaver with our mental health services is something my kids will never have to contend with.

But what about those who are over 25? Or even over 18? I posted a piece last week by a 17-year-old reader who faces a very uncertain future once she turns 18 and transitions from child and adolescent to adult services.

What about those of us who are that bit older, who aren’t hearing the message in school or college? Or those who don’t have ready access to social media? What about workplace mental health? Or those who aren’t working? And what about our older generations? Who is the voice for them?

I think that’s what my issue is. Both these men are giving voice to a particular section of the population, and they are doing it quite remarkably well. But, (and again, just me!!) there are two key issues with this:

  • This is a very sanitized version of mental illness,
  • There’s a glaring gap when it comes to the rest of us.

One of my readers posted this comment in response to my little rant, I think he sums it up nicely:

‘Thanks for saying this, Fiona. We are doing a mental health awareness programme at work and it is just about depression. Yes depression is a terrible thing but so are BPD, Bi-Polar, Schizophrenia, Anxiety, Eating Disorders, and every other mental illness. Surely we wouldn’t talk in terms of physical illness as being cancer? So why treat mental illness differently?’

‘As for celebs being the spokesperson for mental health, fine. But I would rather have as my spokesperson the woman who sat in the psychiatrist’s waiting room the other day; who had to bring her young child to the appointment because she couldn’t afford childcare; who told me how she had no idea how she was going to pay the electricity bill, let alone find money to do the grocery shopping; who was trying her hardest but who looked as if life had finally beaten her. This is the real face of mental illness’

Maybe it’s even more than that. Is it how we talk about it? The fact that we talk about ‘mental illness’. We would never say ‘I have a physical illness’. We’d say ‘I have the flu’. We’re making huge inroads in talking about it, but we’re still dancing around the edges.

I don’t know, I don’t know where I’m going at this stage. I’m tired, and I’m hugely frustrated by everything that’s happened with our mental health services on a national level, particularly in the last week, and on a personal level, for the last……….well, long time.

I just want to see open, honest, real conversation about this. About depression. About bipolar. About borderline. About schizophrenia. About all the other countless illnesses that affect us.

About people.

Mental health and the media (Sunny spells and scattered showers)

Fiona Kennedy on Broadsheet

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Singer, broadcaster, writer and depression sufferer Bressie  (top) will address the committee on health and children tomorrow at 11am.

*swoon*

Previously: An Unavoidable Death

Caoilte’s Dual Diagnosis

Rollingnews

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kj-tIkPQxYM

Magician Shane Gillen “messing with Bressie’s head over a pint in Cassidy’s Bar, [Dublin].”

Filmed and edited by Bold Puppy Productions.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVgYgOiOzV4&sns=tw

Pat Byrne, from ‘Team Bressie’, winner of last nigh’s final of RTE 1’s ‘The Voice’, sings ‘What A Wonderful World’.

He’s good.

But he’s no Bressie.

We missed the VVIPs in Dublin on Holy Thursday (we were on holiday).

But we have just alighted upon this image.

Bli-mey.

Take that, Fassbender/Smithfield Horse Fair, etc.

Thanks Buzz O’Neill

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzpogsWmol4&feature=player_embedded#!

Mickey, Úna and Fran [final year students at Dublin City University] do their rather infectious thing to Bressie’s Breaking My Fall.

A suitable tribute to the one they call His Hotness.

And proof: Irish people can dance.

Meanwhile, ‘Screamer’ writes:

We’ll see your Bressie tribute and raise you Azealia Banks’ potty mouth. A ‘212’ homage filmed in Stoneybatter, Dublin; Ballyshannon, Donegal; Whistler, Canada for our friend Rory’s 30th birthday. First viewing was in Ballyshannon last weekend. NSFW (or your ma)

 

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUiOoRCDd44&feature=player_embedded#!