Tag Archives: Enda Kenny

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RTÉ Television has launched its new schedule for the autumn season.

In regards to its factual content, RTÉ Television writes:

This year RTÉ continues its proud tradition of delivering high-quality factual programming that goes right to the heart of Irish society, defining who we are as a nation. Highlights across both channels include:

Kenny, a landmark two-part documentary charting the rise, fall and rise again of Taoiseach Enda Kenny.

Keeping Ireland Alive: The health service in a day, with 75 cameras following frontline staff over a 24-hour period to give viewers an unprecedented, groundbreaking insight into a service that affects all our lives.

Rural Addiction, tackling the growing problem of addiction sweeping rural Ireland.

Generation Jinxed – Generation F’D, a three-part documentary revealing life for Ireland’s 25-35-year-olds, struggling to kickstart their adult lives.

RTÉ One will feature documentaries bringing in-depth coverage of a broad range of subjects. Highlights include authored documentaries from: Dr Eva Orsmond on prescription pill addiction in Ireland in Medication Nation with Dr Eva; John Connors on the history of the Travellers in John Connors: The Travellers; Ian Kehoe on How Ireland was Bought and Sold and hurling star Henry Shefflin on the psychology of success in Henry Shefflin: Winning.

As regards drama…

Homegrown drama remains a key priority for RTÉ with three brand new shows in production this autumn. Acceptable Risk, a six-part thriller starring Elaine Cassidy and Resistance, a War of Independence drama from the makers of Rebellion, go into production in the coming months. New to RTÉ this season are:

Striking Out, Neil Morrissey joins Amy Huberman and Rory Keenan in the cast of this four-part drama about love, family and friendship in the world of Ireland’s legal system.

Can’t Cope, Won’t Cope, RTÉ2’s six-part darkly comic drama penned by TV newcomer Stefanie Preissner and starring up-and-coming talents Seána Kerslake and Nika McGuigan.

Viewers can also look forward to great Irish-based drama produced by the BBC in association with RTÉ including EastEnders spin-off drama Redwater starring Jessie Wallace, Shane Richie, Fionnula Flanagan and Maria Doyle Kennedy; and My Mother and Other Strangers starring Hattie Morahan, Owen McDonnell and Aaron Staton; as well as The Fall, starring Jamie Dornan and Gillian Anderson, produced by Artists Studio in association with RTÉ.

As regards entertainment and comedy…

The hugely popular family-entertainment series Dancing with the Stars debuts in January putting 11 celebrities through their paces, joining a stellar line-up of new home-produced shows and returning favourites including:

The Tommy Tiernan Show, a six-part chatshow with a difference – Tommy has no idea who he’ll be interviewing before they appear on stage.

The Nathan Carter Show, four-part music-entertainment show hosted by Ireland’s favourite country star.

First Dates, the massively popular dating show returns with a supersized 12 episode series.

Daniel and Majella’s B&B Road Trip, the much-loved duo hit the road again with 12 new B&B owners serving up unforgettable experiences.

RTÉ2’s commitment to developing new talent continues to bear fruit with Bridget & Eamon recently becoming the first RTÉ comedy to be sold to a UK broadcaster, UKTV Gold. Bridget & Eamon will also return for a second season.

Fellow Republic of Telly breakout stars The Rubberbandits return to RTÉ2 for more anarchic comedy with The Rubberbandits’ Guides.

Comedian Des Bishop will throw a wry eye over the issues that have exasperated the country for years in Des Bishop: This is Ireland. And the nation’s favourite Dublin matriarch Mrs Brown will be back with more Christmas specials.

FIGHT!

RTÉ drives home drama in Autumn schedule (RTE)

Meanwhile…

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This afternoon.

At Grand Canal Dock, Dublin 2.

The launch of the new season of programmes on RTÉ One and RTÉ2 at Grand Canal Dock, Dublin.

Rollingnews

Thanks Gareth Naughton

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This afternoon.

Taoiseach Enda Kenny meets British Prime Minister Theresa May at 10, Downing Street in London.

Carpet slippers?

Taoiseach becomes first foreign leader to visit Theresa May (Irish Times)

Via Martina Fitzgerald

Update:

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We both recognised that Ireland is the only EU Member State that shares a land border with the UK. We are in agreement that we don’t wish to see any return to the borders of the past on the island of Ireland.

Today’s meeting also gave us the opportunity to have a broader discussion on the common issues of concern in the context of the referendum result such as our close trading relationship and the benefits of the Common Travel Area.

For our part, we have already made very clear our view Ireland is very much committed to staying in the EU. We want the upcoming negotiation process to end with a prosperous and outward-looking UK which retains a close relationship with the EU. This is in all of our interests.

Taoiseach Enda Kenny this afternoon.

Statement by Taoiseach Enda Kenny following Meeting with Prime Minister Theresa May (Merrion Street)

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Taoiseach Enda Kenny in the Dáil last month when he was questioned about Nama

The Irish Times reports:

Taoiseach Enda Kenny has asked to meet Independent TD Mick Wallace over his call for a commission of inquiry into Project Eagle, the sale of Nama’s Northern Ireland property portfolio.

Yesterday, Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin and Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams met Mr Wallace separately to discuss his call.

The Wexford TD was accompanied at the meetings by solicitor Aidan Eames.
Mr Wallace declined to comment last night.

However, Leinster House sources confirmed that active consideration was being given to setting up some form of inquiry into aspects of the running of the National Asset Management Agency.

Nama inquiry likely as Kenny seeks to meet Wallace over claims (Fiach Kelly, Irish Times)

Previously: Nama and Project Eagle on Broadsheet

 

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Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Theresa Villiers and Taoiseach Enda Kenny at the British-Irish Council (BIC) Summit, Dublin Castle last month; Today’s Irish Independent front page.

Just us so.

A united Ireland, you say?

Slugger O’Toole writes:

Does anybody seriously think that a 56 % majority in favour of Remain on a 63% turnout translates into majority support for a united Ireland? That Northern Ireland outside the EU will produce “a seismic shift?”

“Europe” just isn’t that important in the North, unless it’s exploited as a new tune on the nationalist drum.

So the question the Irish have to answer now is: are you serious?

…If you don’t like the British negotiating position going into the Article 50 process, will you ask the British government to regard the Remain vote which included a fair minority of unionists as evidence which favours a border poll? Do you think the British would agree?

Anyone?

Are the Dublin party leaders serious about raising Unity in the Brexit negotiations or are they playing Dáil politics? (Slugger O’Toole)

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Parliamentary correspondent at The Irish Times, Michael O’Regan; Enda and Nicolas Sarkozy in 2014

This morning.

During The Gathering slot on the Today With Sean O’Rourke show, the panel discussed the fallout of Brexit.

The panel included Stephen Donnelly, Social Democrat TD; Michael O’Regan,  parliamentary correspondent of The Irish Times; Dearbhail McDonald, Group Business Editor at Independent News and Media; and Mairead McGuinness, Fine Gael MEP and Vice-President of the European Parliament.

During their discussion, they talked about the effectiveness of Enda Kenny when it comes to  matters concerning Brexit.

Stephen Donnelly: “I would have no faith in Enda Kenny or Michael Noonan negotiating anything on behalf of Ireland, on a European level. At every single point, during the crisis,  Ireland had either the worst deal, in terms of the bailout or the joint worst deal and every single improvement we got came from Portugal or Greece or another country.”

Michael O’Regan:That’s unfair.”

Donnelly: “No, that is absolutely…”

O’Regan:That’s deeply unfair. That’s deeply unfair.”

Donnelly: “They are the facts.”

O’Regan:No, no, no. That’s deeply unfair to the negotiation skills of Enda Kenny and Michael Noonan and others. Noonan is a very wily, and Kenny…”

Donnelly: “Michael…I’m sorry, Michael…”

O’Regan: “…is recognised in Europe as being quite skilful.”

Donnelly: “And if I was in Europe and Enda Kenny kept coming over and paying me all of this money that he didn’t own, on behalf of the Irish people, I’d be telling everyone he’s a great lad as well. The facts. Let’s look at the facts.  The facts are, we had an every, single point, over the next number of years, the worst deal, or the joint worst deal. The facts are that Eamon Gilmore and Enda Kenny came back and said, ‘look, we have a seismic shift, we’re going to get retrospective recapitalisation’. And the facts are it never happened.

Sean O’Rourke: “But they got back…”

Mairead McGuinness: “The facts also are that the economy has recovered, and needs to recover more, that employment has increased, that there is stability. The option… would you have pulled the plug completely and collapsed the economy, like what Greece tried to do?

Donnelly: “It’s a non-question. Obviously…”

McGuinness: “It’s not a non-question.”

Donnelly: “Mairead, asking someone if they’d collapse the economy is a non-question. The question is when Michael Noonan…”

McGuinness: “Well it could have been the outcome of what you are proposing.”

Donnelly: “The question is when Michael Noonan and Enda Kenny went out to Europe, did they, at any time, get us a better deal?  And the answer to that question is: no, they did not. Our better deals came from Greece and Portugal negotiating better deals and then we got them as well. Just on the leadership, Sean, very quickly. The TDs kind of banging the drum is one thing, actually, the much more interesting bit is the fact that Enda Kenny’s chief economic advisor is on his way to the EIB in a few months time. You want to look at the most telling timetable for the Taoiseach’s departure, it’s when his chief economic advisor leaves, it’s not when…”

O’Rourke: “Sure he can get another one. Sure people are coming and going in the White House all the time…”

McGuinness: “Yeah, I don’t think that’s quite on the button..”

O’Rourke: “And the state department in the United States.. and look Alistair Campbell moved out of 10, Downing Street, long before Tony Blair.”

Listen back here in full

Previously: Embedded

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Taoiseach Enda Kenny

Further to yesterday’s eye-popping CSO figures

Taoiseach and Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny fielded questions from Fianna Fáil leader Micheal Martin about the reported 26.3% growth in the economy.

From the debate…

Taoiseach Enda Kenny: “First, the figures produced yesterday are unprecedented. They do not reflect accurately what is happening in the economy. Obviously, the figure of 26% is unprecedented and significantly stronger than the previous estimate of 7.8%, but it is important to note that is due to exceptional factors. It highlights the complexity and difficulty in interpreting the macroeconomic data in Ireland. The figures reflect a number of factors, including the impact of relocation of entire plcs to Ireland. This would have significantly boosted investment and net exports. Net exports contributed 18% to the 2015 growth figure. Contract manufacturing played a role in the figures. This occurs where an Irish-based company with another manufacturing unit abroad manufactures and sells products to other countries from that unit but is still based in Ireland.”

“While the headline figures can be exaggerated in an Irish context and will obviously be the subject of intense scrutiny, other indicators such as the level of consumer spending, the rise in the level of employment and the continuous drop in unemployment trends, as well as taxation receipts, confirm that there is a strong recovery rooted in the domestic economy in Ireland.”

“That domestic demand – spending by Irish businesses and Irish people – is also growing strongly. It is an opportunity arising from the many sacrifices made during the years.”

“The figures predate the decision in Britain in the referendum. Obviously, there has been a sharp depreciation of sterling since that decision and a deterioration in the outlook for the UK economy. While it is an unprecedented figure, the fact is, based on growth projections in real terms, the growth levels seen in 2015 were both a one-off and exceptional in nature. We cannot make policy on that basis, but the CSO takes into account in compiling its figures issues such as aircraft leasing and manufacturing here by companies that have units abroad.”

“As noted in the summer economic statement which was debated in the Dáil some time ago, the Department of Finance will prepare a full macroeconomic projection in advance of the budget in October. It will include updated estimates of economic growth, the public finances and whatever fiscal space is available to the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, Deputy Paschal Donohoe, taking account of developments up to that time, including the latest CSO numbers and the decision in the United Kingdom.”

Ceann Comhairle Seán Ó Fearghaíl: “The Taoiseach’s time is up.”

Micheál Martin: The Taoiseach did not answer the question, which was whether he would commission the CSO to design a proper, accurate way of calculating the real size of the economy.”

“Professor John FitzGerald, formally of the ESRI, has attempted to do this as an individual. It is shocking that the Department of Finance and the Taoiseach’s Department did not work years ago to create a proper model to calculate the size of the economy.”

The figures are not unprecedented. They are false in terms of what is happening on the ground and the reality in the economy. The CSO says it is including – not taking account of – the impact of aircraft leasing, corporate inversions and contract manufacturing, but none of this impacts on real jobs and investment in the economy, as the thousands of people who are struggling realise. It is not good enough that no one in official Ireland has attempted to address this by coming up with an accurate home-grown model that takes all of this into account, strips it out and gives us a proper figure.”

Ó Fearghaíl: “Thank you, Deputy Martin.”

Martin: “It is essential that this be done, in terms of how we plan our budgets and economy but also in terms of our international reputation. Unfortunately, the international world looks at this with some degree of ridicule and disbelief. There was a time when we would haughtily go around the place questioning the Chinese or the Russians for their economic statistics. Can we really go abroad and hold our heads up high…”

Ó Fearghaíl: “You have made your point, thank you.”

Martin: “…about Irish official statistics? No one in their right mind believes Irish official statistics. This cuts to the heart of our credibility in terms of presenting economic data. This is a serious issue which needs urgent addressing by the Taoiseach’s Department, the CSO and other related State entities.”

Kenny: “It is true to say the CSO is quite independent in how it does its analysis, but it does take these factors into account. Changes have occurred, such as the transition of entire public limited companies to Ireland and the transfer of a significant amount of intellectual property, contract manufacturing and the scale of aircraft leasing.”

The Deputy is right in terms of these figures boosting GDP. There is no proportionate increase in employment. These are figures which are compiled accurately by the CSO and they take into account those changes that have taken place in the international economy.”

“The Deputy is aware of the changes made by the Government in terms of complying with base erosion and profit shifting, BEPS, and the OECD in terms of having got rid of the double Irish concept. The issues of aircraft leasing, contract manufacturing, intellectual property moving onshore here and the transition of entire public limited companies has boosted these figures.”

Ó Fearghaíl: “Thank you, Taoiseach.”

Kenny:The Department of Finance will set out its projections later in the year, but it will also base its policy on a more normal growth rate, such as has been predicted by the Department, of in the region of 3.5% to 4%. I agree that an extraordinary elevation of 26% based on some of these factors and others, such as the depreciation of sterling, do not impact in reality on big numbers in terms of employment…”

Ó Fearghaíl: “Thank you, Taoiseach. The time is up.”

Kenny: “…but it is important that on the underlying issues the growth in jobs and consumer spend and the drop in unemployment is where the real value of the economy is and the projections will be based on 3.5% to 4%.”

There you go now.

Previously: Meanwhile, In Davos

Meanwhile…

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Jason Kelleher, of Irish Political Maps, tweetz:

Part of something larger I’m working on, but here’s the combined Fine Gael-Fianna Fáil vote in 2016…

Transcript via Oireachtas.ie

Irish Political Maps

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Statement issued by Kerry Fine Gael TD Brendan Griffin, top, this morning calling for a new Fine Gael leader by September.

Call for Kenny to stand down as Fine Gael leader (RTE)

Previously:  A Good Time To Be A Griffin

Pic: Catherine Healy

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Via Peter Fitzpatrick

Related: Support for Enda Kenny ebbing away among Fine Gael grassroots (Irish Times)

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Taoiseach Enda Kenny

In recent months, the Irish Government has advocated for our belief that the EU would be better with Britain as a leading member and that Britain and Ireland have always worked together very well as equal partners within the European Union.

I’m very sorry that the result of the referendum is for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union. However, the British people have spoken clearly and we fully respect their position and their decision.

I want to assure the Irish public that we have prepared, to the greatest extent possible, for this eventuality. There will be no immediate change to the free flow of people, of good and of services between our islands.

We have previously set out our main concerns in the event of Brexit becoming a reality. These relate to the potential impacts for trade and for the economy and for Northern Ireland, for the Common Travel Area and for the European Union itself.

We have engaged in detailed contingency planning for the possibility of this result and this morning, at Government, we agreed to publish a summary of the key actions which we will now take to address the contingencies arising from the decision of the electorate of the United Kingdom.

Our primary objective remains to protect and to advance this country’s interest. I propose to further brief the Opposition leaders of those actions in the afternoon and the Dáil will be recalled on Monday.

The Summer Economic Statement, published earlier this week, includes an assessment of the potential economic impact of a UK vote to leave the European Union. Ireland is a strong, open and competitive economy and our ongoing economic recovery is testament to our resilience.

We will continue to implement policies that prioritise economic stability and growth and job creation and to use the benefits of that growth for our people.

…I want to say that we are acutely aware of the concerns which will be felt by the many thousands of people within the Irish community in Britain. Let me assure them that the Irish Government will also have their interests in our thinking, and very much in our thinking as we approach the forthcoming negotiations.

It is important to remember that the position of Irish citizens within the European Union will be unaffected. The other concern that the Government has expressed is about a British departure from the European Union relates to the impact on the European Union itself.

Ireland will, of course, remain a member of the European Union. This is profoundly in our national interest. After more than 40 years of membership, we have built up strong bonds of partnership with all the other member states and with the European institutions and that will continue to serve us well in the time ahead.

We must now, however, being a period of reflection and debate on how we can renew the union of 27 and equip it for the many challenges that lie ahead. There will be a discussion of the next steps at a meeting of the European Council next week.

I will set out, very clearly, our national position at that meeting and I will ensure that our particular national interests are fully respected as we prepare to enter the next phase of negotiations.

From Taoiseach Enda Kenny’s speech delivered earlier following the Brexit vote.

Pic: Rollingnews

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Taoiseach Enda Kenny in Dáil today

RTE reports:

Taoiseach Enda Kenny has brought a memo to Cabinet to set up a citizens’ assembly which will look at a number of issues, starting with the Eighth Amendment.

The Dáil will have to pass a resolution to establish the assembly.

It is understood the assembly will sit for a year to address all issues referred to it, such as fixed parliaments but it will issue a report on each issue as they are completed.

The report on the Eighth Amendment will be referred to an all party Oireachtas committee when completed.

It is thought that the assembly will hold its first meeting by November.

Eighth Amendment to top citizens’ assembly agenda (RTE News)

Previously: ‘Overwriting Fact With Fairy Stories’