Tag Archives: GE16

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FIGHT!

Rollingnews

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Annie West’s timeline to the GE16 speculation…

Meanwhile…

Related: Enda Kenny set to defer taoiseach vote amid TDs’ fury (Irish Examiner)

Via Annie West

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Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams with the party’s new TDs at Leinster House this morning

Further to the yesterday’s post about media bias during General Election 2016.

Evan writes:

Having read your article on #VinB with Mick Clifford on media coverage through #GE16 here is a discussion from The Pat Kenny Show last Friday morning on Newstalk. It annoyed me so much I transcribed it (as below) and lodged a complaint about it.

This was a five-minute discussion with participants which included Pat Kenny, outgoing Independent Senator Averil Power, former political editor of the Sunday Independent and Renua communications director John Drennan and political commentator, former advisor to Bertie Ahern, Paddy Duffy.”

Grab a tay.

Pat Kenny: “Just, a by the way, in terms of Sinn Féin, because they are largely irrelevant to this discussion because they are not going to go into coalition with Fianna Fáil or with Fine Gael. What do you think did for their prospects, I mean they’ve improved their number of seats but at 13 whatever it was, point eight per cent was it, or something certainly less than 14%. It was not up to their expectations. I mean was it? They had no ambition really on the USC which would put money back in people’s pockets or was it the Special Criminal Court or?”

Averil Power: “I think it was two words Gerry Adams… was their leader.”

Paddy Duffy: “Yeah, I think it was the faulty arithmetic of Gerry Adams (A), and (B), no middle sector worker or higher is ever going to let Sinn Féin get near their pay packet, okay. Because they don’t believe in that crazy economics that they have, okay, and then all the other attendant things, Mairia Cahill and all of that sort of stuff and the sort of, the, the stronghold that the Central Committee has on the party as a whole, particularly the women who were quite obviously ill at ease during many of those days, and their Deputy Leader in particular”

Pat Kenny: “Micheál Martin has always been pushing the line that Sinn Féin, Dublin, is controlled by Belfast, is that…”

Duffy: “Well, obviously I don’t personally know, so, this is what people think…”

John Drennan: “It certainly was, it was certainly a strong image was were you letting the Army Council into the cabinet rooms of the State via the back door, if you voted for Sinn Féin? I think another thing to possibly bear in mind is that, was it Ruairí Quinn had a very interesting piece during the middle of the campaign, in the Irish Times on Saturday, where he talked about Labour not really being a party of working class people, and that…”

Duffy: “I agree with that.”

Drennan: “…and what struck me was that, to a certain extent, Sinn Féin are not a party of working class people, in that, in that they have sort of, they’re very opposed or seem to have great difficulty in the sort of tax cuts that would improve the lives of working class people and they don’t understand that working class people aspire to improve their lives, aspire to better education, better services, they’ve no concept of that and I mean if you look at the track record of Sinn Féin in West Belfast and the, the, the almost Stalinist…”

Duffy: “The state of it, the state of it..”

Drennan: “…the East Germany economy that Gerry Adams presides over whilst he flies over in airplanes to get his teeth done in America. They do not…they are not a party with which the working class identify with. And I think they were very much squeezed in this election too, by the multitiude of options that were, such as Averil herself in Dublin Bay North, that was competition to Sinn Féin that they would not have expected and would not have wanted.”

Kenny: “But as part of their overall project they have improved their number of seats. They are obviously hoping that Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael will go into one massive coalition which will allow them to be the largest party on the Opposition benches, not necessarily the loudest voices because you’ll have your Mick Wallaces and you’ll have all those other people who have made the running in the last Dáil.”

Duffy: “Yes, and the party has quite a quota now Pat, of intellectual young things who are very bright, very sharp, very good, very well trained communication-wise. But it’s the gospel they preach is wrong. The performance is fantastic.”

Kenny: “Well, it has to be said…”

Duffy: “…economically, I mean…. economically, yeah.”

Kenny: “In Dun Laoghaire, when we had our debate in Dun Laoghaire the young Sinn Féin candidate, and I was talking about Gerry Adams being perhaps a liability, a political liability, and I didn’t want to go through the list of charges for fear I would be accused of actually… you know…labelling him and he said to me “well, what are you talking about?”. So then I had to begin, reluctantly…”

Laughter

Kenny: “….but he said “I am a child of the Peace Process”. You know he doesn’t have any memory, he could read about it in the history books but it’s not in his DNA.”

Duffy: “And we have to give them credit, I mean we give them tremendous credit. Gerry Adams, [Martin] McGuinness and all that team and all around them for having brought us from that horrible fratricidal war to where we are – that’s to their greatest credit. Simply we don’t believe any of their economic policies.”

Drennan: “They got us into it in the first place.”

Power: “It’s not the legacy of the Troubles that’s holding them back it’s their modern day attitudes on certain issues like the Special Criminal Court. You know I’ve a constituency that includes Coolock and other areas that have been blighted by gangland crime.”

Duffy: “Yeah…”

Power: “And, and people simply don’t understand Sinn Féin’s attitude on the Special Criminal Court. The notion that you would expect ordinary people to serve on a jury who would go up against these kind of gangsters without protection, people just can’t…”

Kenny: “About half of their own supporters disagree with their policy to abolish the Special Criminal Court and another interesting statistic in one of their polls was that… I think it was  40% of their people didn’t trust them on running the economy…of the people that are going to vote for them…”

Laughter

Duffy: “That doesn’t surprise me…”

Laughter

Kenny: “Anyway I want to read you some of the texts…”

Listen back in full here (part 3).

Leah Farrell/Rollingnews

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Pro Choice supporter in Dublin in 2012

According to the whichcandidate.ie election site, of the 44 elected Fianna Fáil TDs, only two – Lisa Chambers and Jim O’Callaghan – favour expanding access to abortion; of 50 Fine Gael TDs, only Kate O’Connell and Paschal Donohoe favour more liberal laws.

To put those figures in context: while 87% of the general population favour expanding access to abortion, only 4.5% of Fianna Fáil TDs and 4% of Fine Gael TDs do.

… I agree that the campaign to Repeal the Eighth Amendment isn’t going to lie down under a conservative coalition. I too believe that we can put a referendum on this government’s agenda.

But if our referendum is begrudged to us by overwhelmingly anti-choice politicians, are these really the people we want to preside over it?

Leo Varadkar, minister for health under the outgoing government, regarded by many as a future Fine Gael leader, has publicly stated that while the current legislation may be too restrictive, he wants to keep a “pro-life” amendment in the constitution.

After all our work, can Ireland’s feminist movement risk letting Fine Fáil scheme to replace the eighth with another constitutional amendment? To offer – masquerading as middle ground – not the opportunity to repeal the eighth but to amend it?

Ireland’s election result is no stepping stone to abortion rights. It’s a roadblock (Emer O’Toole, The Guardian)

Laura Hutton/Rollingnews

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From top: Panel on last night’s Tonight with Mick Clifford, and graphs from early findings of a study by the Institute for Future Media and Journalism at Dublin City University

Last night, on TV3’s Tonight With Mick Clifford, the show’s panel discussed the media’s impact on the general election.

The panel included director of the Institute for Future Media and Journalism at Dublin City University, Jane Suiter; our own Julien Mercille; Sinead Carroll of the Journal; and John Devitt, from Transparency International Ireland.

At the beginning of their discussion, Ms Suiter presented the preliminary findings of an unfinished study by FUJO which is looking at the coverage of the election by the Irish Times, the Irish Independent and the Journal.

She explained that the study’s findings to date are solely based on coverage up to a week before the election and that the final week has yet to be investigated. She also said FUJO will be looking at the coverage of RTÉ and TV3.

Several graphics from the study were shown (see above), prompting Ms Suiter to explain:

“The [Irish] Independent was taking the Government line of ‘Stability v Chaos’ so ‘stick with [Enda] Kenny and it’s stability, go with [Gerry] Adams and it’s chaos’, whereas the Irish Times weren’t taking that line because they were saying, ‘well no it’s Kenny versus [Micheal] Martin’ so it was kind of the old choice that we’re used to. And then the Journal just took a very, sort of straightforward one between the three of them.”

Further to the study’s findings presented by Ms Suiter, the panel discussed the coverage as a whole.

From the discussion…

Julien Mercille: “I think there is maybe some differences between the various outlets but, by and large, the mass media gave a very favourable view for the Government. I mean you didn’t have much of a challenge to the Government parties. You did have that, maybe in a tactical way but not in a fundamental way. Take, for example, the best issue to illustrate this is healthcare. We know it’s the number one issue for voters. Exit polls show, and polls before, this is probably the most poorly reported issue in the whole country, healthcare. There isn’t a single article that calls for an Irish NHS for example which is the thing we need. It’s cheaper…”

Mick Clifford: “I saw a few…”

Mercille: “…and it’s also better for health.”

Clifford: “Absolutely but I saw a few of them, I have to say, I saw…”

Mercille: “Oh really?”

Clifford: “I did.”

Mercille: “Calling for an Irish NHS? Maybe once every now and then, but that’s not very…”

Clifford: “Well, universal health care, they didn’t necessarily say…”

Mercille: “It’s very different, it’s not the same thing. It’s not the same thing at all. It could be but it doesn’t have to be.”

Clifford: “Right and there’s one other thing there that I would suggest and that is that, despite that being shown, in previous elections and admittedly this turned out to be different, in previous elections, people concentrated on the economy, they concentrated on tax cuts and spending increases..”

Jane Suiter: “But actually they didn’t because we…”

Clifford: “Not in this, no, but in previous..”

Suiter: “Yeah, well in the previous election, it was all about the bailout and the Troika programme, that was the whole focus of it but actually in this one, in many, actually the focus was on party politics. So which party is up and down in the polls? Which party is going to go into coalition?”

Clifford: “Rather than the issues?”

Suiter: “Rather than the issues. So there was actually very little focus even on macro economic issues or on on micro, on tax and spending…”

Talk over each other

Mercille: “There were articles about Enda Kenny and his wife, as if this was any way important…”

Clifford: “Aaah Julien…”

Mercille: “Nothing, it is true. Nothing about..”

Clifford: “Enda Kenny and his wife.”

Mercille: “Nothing about the main policies, such as healthcare, poverty, the fact that Ireland is a tax haven. You didn’t have much of that. It was all about the person and the looks and all that.”

Later

Sinéad O’Carroll: “Because we didn’t know, we knew that there wasn’t going to be anyone that would run away and be able to get an easy majority, we knew there was no-one able to get that magic number, so it did become, then, a game of looking at who was going to go in with who and, because no-one was giving definitive answers, that became the narrative.”

Clifford: “Was that to the detriment of, was that to the detriment of examining policies?”

O’Carroll: “I think so, absolutely, and I think, but I think also, there was, the Irish Times had a really beautiful feature on their, online, and they had absolutely every issue covered and you went into it and you could see the party policy on every single issue. Not many people talked about that feature that they had.”

Suiter: “The other interesting thing was how little focus was on any of the smaller parties or the Independents.”

Clifford: “John [Devitt], did you find it balanced, imbalanced? Or how?”

Devitt: “Well, it’s difficult to say but I think the broadcasters appeared not to have planned much of their coverage of the election, they were led by the news cycle. So, in the first week, we had wall-to-wall coverage of the Kinahan-Hutch feud and the shooting in the Regency Hotel, in the second week there was a lot of talk about fiscal space and Kenny and Adams grasp, or lack thereof of financial, their own financial data and then, in the last week or so, there were two days coverage of the Taoiseach’s comments around whingers in Castlebar. So it appeared there was little focus on, as you say, on the issues themselves.”

Later

Devitt: “In Cork there was coverage around, or there was a lack of coverage in the national media, about and interview I think, on Cork local radio [Red FM] of Enda Kenny and there were allegations by the, was it Neil Prendeville, he had alleged that Kenny’s advisors, or his media handlers were putting him under pressure to wrap up a rather intense interview with the Taoiseach. We didn’t see that kind of questioning of Martin or Kenny elsewhere in the mainstream media.”

O’Carroll: “There’s a certain politeness, I think, that goes along with Cabinet ministries, positions and with the Taoiseach and I think, obviously, I think sometimes a lot of people, say the Vincent Browne style questioning, if you’re not answering a question, you don’t get away with that. I think, in other studios, people do get away with not answering a question because the impoliteness isn’t there and I think that is to the detriment of getting answers to questions.”

Mercille: “I agree. It’s also to do with the ideology. I mean Gerry Adams will be questioned a lot, whatever he is…”

Clifford: “Should he be questioned more than the other leaders?”

Mercille: “Not at all, I mean he’s not in power, he didn’t make the policies, he didn’t create the mess we have. He could be questioned, he should be questioned on other things, if you like, but I mean the imbalance is just blatant. I mean people were even saying, my god, if the Indo keeps going like that, they’ll backfire on their own terms..”

Clifford: “Just to make a few distinctions here. I think, and I think it is fair to say, and I think an awful lot of people feel that the Independent group in particular covered Sinn Fein in a manner that perhaps a lot of people felt was imbalanced. That doesn’t mean that the whole of the media did that. That’s the first issue…”

Mercille: “Well the media is very…”

Clifford: “Julien.”

Mercille: “The Indo was more explicit and I’m actually more comfortable with that because, actually, there is a view there and you can disagree with the Indo’s view. Sinn Fein is never covered positively in any media, any mass media, except for exceptions all right. You see the problem with Sinn Fein and the coverage is that let’s say when Gerry Adams was on Sean O’Rourke, people were making fun of his math and all that. Fine, you want to talk about the issue of economic policy, fine, but then you have to criticise Enda Kenny and Fine Gael for their austerity.”

Talk over each other

Clifford: “Hang on there’s a difference between, hold on, there’s a difference between criticising somebody for their grasp of the issues, and criticising somebody for the nature of their policies. Absolutely you…”

Mercille: “Well Fine Gael doesn’t understand economics because if you understand economics, no, if you understand economics, if you understand economics, the first thing you do is not austerity in times of recession.”

Clifford: “I know, that’s one side of it. That’s a different issue, that’s one side of an argument.”

Mercille: “It’s a more important point than not knowing about the math of this budget or something.

Later

Mercille: “The reason Sinn Fein is attacked so much is because it’s the only force in this country that can challenge the establishment. Whether you love Sinn Fein or you hate them.”

Clifford: “Oh, so Sinn Fein are not the establishment?”

Mercille: “They’re much less establishment than Fine Gael or Fianna Fail.”

Clifford: [Inaudible]

Mercille: “Oh you think? Oh really. When’s the last time they were in Government?”

Clifford: “They’re in the Government in the North, they’re the biggest party in the…”

Talk over each other

Clifford: “They’re the biggest party in the local elections…”

Mercille: “I’m not saying they’re a bit part of the establishment. But they can challenge Fine Gael and Fianna Fail much more than let’s say…”

Clifford: “You’re suggesting that questioning Sinn Fein has absolutely nothing to do with other elements, apart from their socioeconomic position?”

Mercille: “Do you have other aspects you could question? You could talk about the North, if you like, you could talk about anything, you could talk about nationalism, you could talk about Gerry Adam’s past. That’s all fine. But you have to do it, not in a double standards way. If you want to talk about the economy, fine. But then talk about austerity. If you want to talk about…”

Clifford: “Has it not been talked about?”

Mercille: “Not in the right way. It hasn’t been challenged, the media endorsed austerity all the way, across the board and they’ve said it explicitly themselves.”

Clifford: “Jane, just to, in fairness, because it is an issue, I’m not singling out one party but it is an issue as to whether or not Sinn Fein got a fair shake. What do you think?”

Suiter: “Yeah, absolutely, in the other ones, because the coding we used is coding that’s been used in Greece and in Spain and in Portugal and in Germany, so it’s developed in a pan-European group. And when we looked at it, and looked at the tone of coverage, there was a negative tone of coverage for Gerry Adams compared with the other leaders but it was driven by the Indo. And the tone of coverage for Gerry Adams, in the Journal and in the Irish Times, was neutral. It wasn’t positive, but it was neutral. And the tone of coverage for all of the leaders, in all of the newspapers was broadly neutral.”

Later

O’Carroll: “A lot of talk was about how they [Sinn Fein] wanted to abolish the Special Criminal Court and I think a lot of people might have thought that that was kind of at the forefront of their manifesto. It was in fact mentioned once on page 46 of their manifesto. It is, you have to put it to them when it’s, exactly…”

Clifford: “Because, a couple of weeks before it…”

O’Carroll: “Exactly…”

Clifford: “Slab Murphy was convicted… Gerry Adams introduces the Special Criminal Court..”

O’Carroll: “I’m not saying that that was something that was done in error. I’m just saying it’s a manner of the news cycle, that’s how it happens. So it wasn’t a vendetta about picking out something that may not have been on the top of their agenda and making it so in front pages, it was because it happened to come up.”

Devitt: “I think broadcast media, in particular, have a responsibility to manage the election coverage very carefully and not be so reactive to the news cycle. Print media also need to be very careful, or more careful I should say…”

Clifford: “The broadcast media though are restricted by the BAI and they have to literally measure balance…”

Devitt: “Oh absolutely but, by the same token,  they were still very much led by what was in the newspaper, in the news, that day…”

Clifford: “The actual topics, yeah.”

Devitt: “And when you look at the questions that were asked of the leaders during the three debates, on RTE and on TV3, they were still very much led by what was in, or influence by, what was in the newspaper that day.”

O’Carroll: “Well it’s not only what’s in the newspapers, it’s what’s people, in general, are talking about and what people have questions about.”

Devitt: “Well, I mean there were issues like climate change or corruption – which was a big issue just in December – that were barely mentioned during the leaders’ debates.”

Suiter: “Or Repeal the 8th wasn’t mentioned much in the leaders’ debates. I think a big thing is that fact that the smaller parties, and Independents,  weren’t covered much by the, you know, we saw in the poll afterwards…”

Clifford: “It’s a proportionate thing though..”

Suiter: “No, but they have a huge proportion of the vote now, as we’ve seen and they didn’t get it and, the same thing in the leaders’ debates. They had a huge proportion of the vote and they weren’t there.”

Watch back in full here

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Fine Gael’s James Bannon and Labour’s Willie Penrose at the Longford-Westmeath count last night

Oh dear.

Previously: How Many?

Pic: Eugene Deering

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From left: Former Cork East Fine Gael TD Tom Barry and Minister for Jobs Richard Bruton

Earlier this evening, former FG TD for Cork East Tom Barry spoke to Mary Wilson on RTÉ’s Drivetime.

Mr Barry lost his seat at the weekend.

Now he wants Enda Kenny to lose his leadership of Fine Gael.

Mary Wilson: “You lost your seat in Cork East on Saturday. Do you look at your leadership and party headquarters? Did you feel let down?”

Tom Barry: “Well, hi Mary. Certainly, you know, while we all ran very good campaigns on the ground, there was certainly no welcome within our party for people like myself who were outspoken. If you offered constructive criticism, it was almost dismissed. And there seemed to be a willingness to look at focus groups and advisors rather than look at the people who were dealing, you know, the elected representatives who were dealing on the ground with people. And it’s very disappointing, because, you know, we all have a lot of experience to offer and, you know, we have obviously suffered because of that. And I would say now, you know, for people who are saying, ‘let Fianna Fail and Fine Gael go in together’, I mean we did not get a mandate to govern this time and, you know, give the people what they voted for. They’re looking for an alternative government – whatever it’s going to bring, be it Fianna Fáil, Sinn Féin and Independents because the people who came out last week – shouting and roaring and saying they had all the solutions to all the problems that we know are there – they need to come out today with those solutions and say they want to form a government to actually implement those solutions.”

Wilson: “We’ll get to formation of Government in a moment. Stay with your years as a deputy and the Fine Gael parliamentary parties where every TD is entitled to have his or her say. You say there were things you wanted to say. Enda Kenny has always been seen as a chairman, a very good manager of the party. Was he not listening to you?”

Barry: “Well, I mean I often spoke up and criticised at meetings…”

Wilson: “What did you criticise?”

Barry: “Well, initially, I suppose, the very first one where we had a problem was when Kevin Cardiff made such a mistake in finance and I asked for him to be removed. He wasn’t removed, he was promoted. And I took that very bad because I just felt it gave the wrong, the wrong…”

Wilson: “The wrong impression… And what else, for example, around the setting up of Irish Water, were you a supporter of that?”

Barry: “Look, I mean, I’ve run a business for many years and I’ve paid for water. I argued about how they could do it many different ways but, you know what, they were pulling in solutions day after day, trying to manage a situation that was getting out of hand but none of us were asked for our opinion. We were never given…”

Wilson: “What about the issues of health on the ground, and you’ve had issues of overcrowding in the Cork University Hospital, did you raise those issues?”

Barry: “Well, health wasn’t, to be fair, wasn’t my area of expertise but I mean, week upon week, we brought up cases of, when the negotiations for the, or the review of the discretionary medical cards. I mean there was, eventually it led to a point where I had to march up to the Taoiseach’s office and demand that a certain individual who was absolutely worthy of a medical card but to be given it because I wasn’t elected to see people like that without a medical card. It was absolutely ridiculous…”

Wilson: “And did you march up?”

Barry: “Yes I did.”

Wilson: “And did you march in? Did you talk to the Taoiseach?”

Barry: “I did of course and I was absolutely at my wits end because, to be honest, that wasn’t good enough. I mean we had it for weeks upon weeks at the parliamentary party, bringing it up and this was done for a so-called saving of €28million but it’s you know, it’s very frustrating when you’re in a backbench position – you give your opinion, you expect it to be taken on board but it wasn’t. And, you know, that’s the reality of it.”

Wilson: “Do you feel let down by Enda Kenny?”

Barry: “Well look, I mean, I feel very disappointed that there wasn’t a more open government. I think they’ve in fairness, I think there was a lot of control exercised and I think they’re reaping the rewards of that control now. And to be fair, look, I’m not bitter, I mean I’m just saying it as it is. I’m obviously not part of this new government and I’ll move on with my life and, luckily enough, I can go back to my business but there are many others who can’t who were extremely good TDs…”

Wilson: “And what should Enda Kenny do now?

Barry: “Well, he needs to take responsibility. We have seen our party go into a meltdown, we got more seats than we deserved because a lot of Labour TDs unfortunately were eliminated to elect Fine Gael and vice versa. That won’t happen again when those people are gone. Any person who’s in charge of an organisation where such a seismic collapse happens, you know, in my view, has to go..”

Wilson: “He has to go, and go now?”

Barry: “I mean this isn’t personal, this is just being quite frank about it. It’s a situation that’s unacceptable. But I would say also there is no mandate for Fine Gael to go into Government. We’ll let Fianna Fáil, Sinn Féin, and all the other parties that are out there who have got votes based on criticism and so-called solutions to let those solutions come into play. I mean, ironically, a lot of them would get their money from increasing corporation tax. They’re anti-Europe and anti-Germany but they’re doing the very things that Europe wants us to do. And just watch the reaction of the many multinationals who give valuable employment here when we start becoming unpredictable…in our economics..”

Wilson: “So you, sorry Tom Barry, for interrupting you, so you think it’s time for Enda Kenny to go, to go now. Who would you like to see replacing him?”

Barry: “Well we’re very fortunate in the party to be fair. We still have extremely capable people such as Frances Fitzgerald, Leo Varadkar, Simon Coveney, there are many, many of them, they are very good people who I think can make a definite change and have the energy to do so but it’s not my call. I’m not a member of the parliamentary party, I’m simply like everybody else now at this stage, watching it but I do have a very informed position at this moment in time and that’s, it’s only my opinion. Certainly, look, I can’t affect change but this country is at a very pivotal point.”

Wilson: “And would you be saying any of this if you were still the Fine Gael TD for Cork East?

Barry: “Absolutely, absolutely, I went to An Taoiseach’s office in Christmas 2014 to vocalise, there was a lot of problems going on at the time, to say, ‘look if it keeps going, something will have to change’ and I’ve made my feelings clear on this. Certainly, one of my first actions, if I was in the parliamentary party would have been to ask for the general secretary to consider his position.”

Wilson: “Tom Curran?”

Barry: “Yes, that fiasco we had with, up in Sligo, where half a million was absolutely wasted…”

Wilson: “The John Perry court case?”

Barry: “Aw sure it was a ridiculous situation where the Taoiseach had said that he could run and apparently he didn’t say it and then, all of us sudden, we go to court and then we pull out, lose half a million which is ridiculous, and then, you know, we have situations where the general secretary is supposed to know what’s happening on the ground and has, in a lot of cases, you know, his interference has lost us seats – that’s the reality of it. The figures don’t lie.”

Wilson: “You blame, do you, the loss of your seat in Cork East on Taoiseach Enda Kenny and the general secretary of the party, Tom Curran?”

Barry: “Well mine and a lot of others but look…”

Listen back in full here

Rollingnews

Bonkers.

Previously: Meanwhile, In The RDS

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Unsuccessful Independent general election candidate for Mayo Gerry O’Boyle

Further to yesterday’s post

The Mayo News reports:

A defeated Mayo candidate in the general election is to launch a High Court bid to have the constituency’s result declared null and void and a new election called.

Independent candidate Gerry O’Boyle received just 126 first preference votes, but he claims ‘there was a thousand votes robbed off me’.

Mr O’Boyle further claims that he lost a lot of votes in Claremorris and Ballyhaunis, claiming votes went ‘missing’ sometime between the polling stations closing on Friday night and the count starting in the Royal Theatre in Castlebar on Saturday morning.

Ballyhaunis-based O’Boyle said he is lodging High Court application papers this week and applying to get the ‘General Election Mayo four-seater recalled as a new election’.

“I’ve had people contact me from all over the county who said they voted for me and it didn’t come through. I’m not in this to get a seat. I know my vote wouldn’t be that high, but I expected to get 1,000 to 1,200 first preferences,” Mr O’Boyle told The Mayo News last night.

For instance, in the Crossboyne box I have nine dead certs there, and only one vote came up on the tally. We have a whistleblower in relation to what I am saying, but I am not willing to say any more about the whistleblower, as there is a legal case pending. We’ve enough evidence. Independents were targeted. You might think I’m mad, but I’m not. It was a total fraud,” he added.

…“Something went wrong. I’m not a whinger. I’m a fair sport player. I can take my beating. I’m not a child throwing my rattle out of the cradle. I know I’m right here,” he said.

Independent candidate claims election was ‘rigged’ (The Mayo News)

Previously: Hold The Mayo

Pic: Gerry O’Boyle (Facebook)

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Further to his fairytale-character-filled ‘how to vote‘ video.

Sean O’Laoghaire writes:

“I just had to give a report from the counting centre! Thank you…”