Tag Archives: Golden Discs

This is no time for losers.

Every week, we give away a voucher for Golden Discs worth TWENTY FIVE EUROS.

All we ask from you is a tune we can play an unspecified time next week.

This week’s theme: Queen.

To mark this week’s opening of the Freddie Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody, what Queen song has you caressing your mike stand suggestively while going  quietly Ga Ga.

To enter, please complete this sentence

‘While not massive Queen fan, I believe their greatest moment was__________________owing to its________________’

Lines MUST close at 6.35pm EXTENDED until MIDNIGHT!

No Bohemian Rhapsody, sorry.

Golden Discs

Previously: Broadsheet Trailer Park: Bohemian Rhapsody

Last week, with a Golden Discs voucher worth Twenty Five Euros on offer, we asked you to name the finest song in AC/DC’s ‘cannon’.

You answered in your tens.

But there could be only one winner.

In reverse order then…

Highway To Hell

Scottser writes:

For those about to rock, please play AC/DC’s highway to hell because it is possibly the easiest lead break you can learn. it’s made up of four or five very recycleable licks; a Chuck Berry, a James Burton, another Chuck Berry and some lovely Angus long note holds.

No widdly nonsense, just a really well constructed boogie. the tune also has one of the best kick drum sounds ever recorded and is only a few bpm off the Bee Gees so you can shake your tush to it when no-one’s looking.

Riff Raff

Paul writes:

‘For those about to rock, please play AC/DC’s ‘Riff Raff’ because it is an accurate description of who riffraff really are!

Shot Down In Flames

Scundered writes:

For those about to rock, please play AC/DC’s “Shot down in flames” because it reminds me of the time in early 1980s that I asked out Karen McCutcheon and even gave her a box of After Eights with £1 sellotaped to the outside, I couldn’t believe she would turn down such a generous offer. She still took the money and ate the After Eights….

It’s a Long Way To The Top (If You Want To Rock ‘n’ Roll)

Alf S. Perez-Lee writes:

For those about to rock, please play AC/DC’s “It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)” because it is the best use of Rock ‘N’ Roll bagpipes EVER! In fact, bagpipes should be banned except for in this song.

Winner!

Thunderstruck

The Q47 writes:

For those about to rock, please play AC/DC’s Thunderstruck because it is the Culchie’s anthem, and is best played near the end of a country wedding (about 1:30am or later), with your tie around your head, your suit trousers rolled up to the knee, and playing your air guitar while head-banging, or else while duck-stepping all around the dance floor….

Thanks all

Last week: Whole Lotta Noisy

Golden Discs

Every week, we give away a Twenty FIVE EURO voucher for Golden Discs to a Broadsheet music fan.

All we ask in return is a suggested tune we can play at an unspecified time next week.

This week’s theme: AC/DC

What riff-soaked song from the Australian boogie-infused heavy metal merchant’s ‘cannon’ has you literally shaking all night long, possibly into the early hours?

To enter, please complete this sentence:

‘For those about to rock, please play AC/DC’s ___________________________because it is_____________________________________’

Lines MUST close at 6.15pm 6am Friday

Golden Discs

Last week, with a Twenty FIVE EURO voucher to spend at any of the many Golden Discs stores nationwide on offer we asked: what is the best post-Beatles tune by a Beatle?

You answered in your droves.

But there could only be one winner.

In reverse order so.

John Lennon- Mind Games

Please writes:

Nothing really encapsulates the Yoko Ono era and her influence – mostly for good in my opinion like the stunning crescendo to “Yes is the answer” in that song.

George Harrison – My Sweet Lord

Gareth writes:

… because of the way the song builds with each instrument joining makes for great listening. Also it is a very singable song.

Dub Spot writes:

…because of that Phil Spector produced wall of sound blended harmomic, chant-like chorus of the Hari Krishna and Christian dieties and because the song’s power reached the inner mind to the extent that Harrison was found to have subconsciously plagiarised “He’s So Fine”, a 1963 hit for the New York girl group the Chiffons. Great introduction to Mr H’s slide guitar technique too.

 

George Harrisson – Wah Wah

Seanydelight writes:

… because its what they would have made if they didn’t split up. Also, because of that brass layer

Oisin writes:

… because it sounds as fresh as the day it was first recorded and should have been on Abbey Road.

Winner!

Paul McCartney – Back Seat Of My Car

Ivan writes:

The finest post-Beatles song by a Beatle is Macca’s The Back Seat of my Car because for me, it could’ve sat on Abbey Road and nobody would turn a hair.

It’s pedestrian enough really for the first 3 minutes, if you can call that achingly lovely melody ‘pedestrian’ but it’s at around the 3 minute mark where the repeated ‘We believe that we can’t be wrong’ gets repeated that it really starts to cook.

First there’s a key change, a slowdown of tempo, a wee drum fill and then fuppin’ hell does he cuts loose with the kind of screech that ten years earlier was puttin’ manners on lairy sailors in Hamburg.

Meanwhile, underneath the yowling there’s an orchestral motif/descending baseline thing that I’m pretty sure Guns’n’Roses had their eye on when they were winding down November Rain, which falls into a false ending, it all goes a bit mad for twenty seconds and all you can think is ‘Jaysus’.

If the song stopped before any of that McGubbins kicked off, it’d *still* be better than 75% of John’s solo output; the fact that it doesn’t and instead he just spends the last minute and a half simply showing off (because he’s Macca) in the way he does is mesmerising and sickening in equal measure. Probably rather like the man himself.

Thanks all

Golden Discs

Last week: Frog Chorus, Anyone?

Thanks Bertie

Every week, we give away a voucher worth TWENTY FIVE EUROS to spend at any of the many Golden Discs branches nationwide.

All we ask is for a tune we can play at an unspecified time next week

This week’s theme: The Beatles solo.

What post-Fab effort from John, Paul, George or, possibly, Ringo do you deem built to last and – whisper it – up there with the best of their former band’s catalogue.

To enter, please complete this sentence:

‘The finest post-Beatles song by a Beatle is__________________________________because______________________’

Lines MUST close at 6.15pm MIDNIGHT

No ‘Imagine’.

Sorry.

Golden Discs

Thanks Bertie Blenkinsop

Last week, with a Twenty Five Euro Golden Discs voucher on offer, we asked you to recall the funniest lyrics you’ve ever heard in a decent song.

You answered in your dozens.

But there could be only one winner.

In reverse order then…

Half Man Half Biscuit – 4AD3DCD

Spudnick writes:

Half Man Half Biscuit. For the song titles alone:
Back in the DHSS
Dickie Davies Eyes
I Love You Because (You Look Like Jim Reeves)
Voyage to the Bottom of the Road
We Built This Village on a Trad. Arr. Tune
Four Lads who Shook the Wirral
All I Want For Christmas Is A Dukla Prague Away Kit.
And, from 4AD3DCD (above): ‘Never mind ‘I’ve played postal chess / With a man who doesn’t know me / I’ve got a better frown than Tony Iommi’

Citizen Smith – Naughty Urban Guerilla

Slightly Bemused writes::

OK, showing my age here, but i think the funniest lyrics are from a song by Wolfie Smith and the Tooting Popular Front:

Well the rich kids’ fun was over and they knew who to blame
It was the presence of some peasants who just wouldn’t play the game
The party wasn’t over yet but I’ve got this kind of hunch
That some naughty urban guerrilla put some laxative in the punch…

Bell X1 – Rocky Took A Lover

SB writes:

The funniest lyrics contained in a decent song are
But you weren’t so nice last night
You’re such an asshole when you’re drunk’
And he said, ‘At least I’m okay in the mornings’
…and…
‘if there was a God, then why is my arse the perfect height for kicking?’

Pulp – Common People

Stan writes:

The funniest lyrics contained in a decent song are in Common People by Pulp:
‘She Said…….”I want to sleep with common people, like you”/ Well what else could I do?/ I said ‘I’ll see what I can do”

The Divine Comedy – National Express

Steve writes:

The funniest lyrics contained in a decent song are by Divine Comedy:
‘On the National Express there’s a jolly hostess
Selling crisps and tea
She’ll provide you with drinks and theatrical winks
For a sky-high fee
Mini-skirts were in style when she danced down the aisle
Back in ’63 (yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah)
But it’s hard to get by when your arse is the size
Of a small country
And everybody sings ‘ba ba ba da”

Winner

George Carlin – Modern Man

Joe writes:

Try and beat thi… by a 70+ year old before being woke, #metoo, Kardashians, snowflake….It may not be music per se but it is rap and better than Eminiem… spoken word poetry can be musical sometimes but this is bad ass jazz comedy…For everything else there’s Curtis Mayfield

Thanks all.

Last week: Funny How?

Golden Discs

Every week, we give away a voucher for Golden Discs worth TWENTY FIVE Euro to spend at any of the many Golden Discs stores nationwide.

All we ask from you is a song we can play next week.

This week’s theme:
Funny lyrics

What song retains musical excellence while also comprising lyrics – wry, dry or laugh out loud funny – that lift your spirits in the darkest of times.

To enter, complete this sentence

“The funniest lyrics contained in a decent song  are_____________________from_____________’

Lines MUST close at 6.45pm. MIDNIGHT

Golden Discs

Thanks Bertie Blenkinsop

Last week, with a Twenty Five Euro voucher for Golden Discs on offer, we asked you to name the greatest every break-up song.

You responded in your sobbing dozens.

But there could be only one winner.

In reverse order then…

Ivan writes:

At the close of a relationship,, to make sense of it all, I usually reach for Yes by McAlmont & Butler owing to its defiance, its not-giving-a-fupp and a production that Phil Spector himself would’ve probably considered a smidgin OTT.

small ads writes:

At the close of a relationship,, to make sense of it all, I usually reach for Serge Gainsbourg singing Je suis venu te dire que je m’en vais owing to its brutal realism (sob).”

Hank writes:

The Cure, A Letter to Elise. I cried for hours one night drinking whisky and listening to that on repeat. Good times…

Verbatim: writes:

At the close of a relationship, to make sense of it all, I usually reach for Motown music owing to beautiful yet simple lyrics…

As I walk this land of broken dreams,
I have visions of many things.
But happiness is just an illusion,
Filled with sadness and confusion.
What becomes of the broken hearted
Who had love that’s now departed?
I know I’ve got to find
Some kind of peace of mind
Maybe.

Scottser writes:

At the close of a relationship, to make sense of it all, I usually reach for the Saturday Boy by Billy Bragg for the lines:

In the end it took me a dictionary
To find out the meaning of ‘unrequited’
While she was giving herself for free
At a party to which i was never invited

Winner!

Slightly Bemused writes:

“At the close of a relationship,, to make sense of it all, I usually reach for ‘You To Me Are Everything’ by the Real Thing owing to its proof that to her, I was only a clown. What I am trying to get across is not not me being pathetic, but actually that I do not regret the relationships. I have a beautiful daughter because of one of those, and I can never regret that.
When my marriage broke up, one of my best friends put together a mix tape (OK, on CD, but the same principle) with songs that ran the gamut from pain of heartache (The Thrill Has Gone – BB King) through a few others (like American Woman -my ex was from the States) to eventual hope for recovery (interestingly, the theme from Greatest American Hero).
It helped me also look at what I did to cause the breakup, and learn. And so, hopeful of a better next relationship, helped by my learning about myself and what I bring there,
So this begs the question: what song at the start of the relationship?

Anyone?

Thanks all

Golden Discs

Previously: How Do You Mend A Broken Heart?

Every week, we give away a voucher worth Twenty Five Euro to spend at any of the many Golden Disc stores nationwide.

All we ask from you is a tune we can play at an unspecified time next week.

This week’s theme: Break-up songs.

in the aftermath of a protracted split, what song soothes your soul, balms your heart and puts you back on your feet in ‘no time’.

To enter, complete this sentence:

‘At the close of a relationship,, to make sense of it all,  I usually reach for______________________________owing to its____________________________’

Lines MUST close at 9.45pm

Golden Discs

Last Friday, with a Golden Discs voucher on offer, we asked you to name one album – stone cold classic or underrated masterpiece – that must be listened to in one sitting without interruption, preferably with earphones and the phone off.

You answered in your dozens.

But there could be only one voucher winner.

In reverse order so…

Dylad: “The one album that needs to be listened to in its entirety without interruption is Miles Davis In a Silent Way because it teases and withholds beautifully and the pay-off at 31 minutes is orgasmic. Thanks, Tony Williams.”

Alison: “The one album that needs to be listened to in its entirety without interruption is A Grand Don’t Come for Free by The Streets because it is a story and you really want to know what happens in the end. It manages to get mad ones, heartbreak, positivity, negativity and humour across in such a realistic way and is a lovely slice of the era when it was released!”

Leopold Gloom: “The one album that needs to be listened to in its entirety without interruption is Yankee Hotel Foxtrot by Wilco. It is simply one of the great American albums of the 21st centure, and of the last 25 or so years. Bookended by the sublime and epic 7 minute songs “I Am Trying To Break Your Heart” and “Reservations” it zips through styles, folk, rolk, jazz, blues, lo-fi noise, punk and more throughout its 50 minutes. Much of it is blink and you’ll miss it. It is graced by much of Jeff Tweedy’s best lyrics too, at a time when he and some of the band were at their lowest personal moments and it got endlessly delayed in record company purgatory destined to not be released.It is an essential album, in the way Cormac McCarthy’s border trilogy are essential reading. Dark, moody, captivating; full of joy.”

Sean: “The one album that needs to be listened to in its entirety without interruption is Blood And Chocolate by Elvis Costello because it reminds me of some wild raucous lost nights of a mispent youth. The song I Want You reminds me of my mate [ Broadsheet commenter] Bernie as she’s a dead ringer for the dark haired girl in the video. Bernie gave me the heads up re Broadsheet, she’s a big fan but is on a temporary ban or something ATM. Anyhoo “Bernie” stop acting the goat and enjoy the song.”

Boj “The one album that needs to be listened to in its entirety without interruption is The Propellerheads: Decksandrumsandrockandroll because it’s an amazing mashup of hip-hop, big-beat and jazz! It has to be one of my favourite driving albums also for cruising around the village in the evening, slow groove beats pumping up Main St. with the windows/trousers down.”

Joe:George Carlin – It’s Bad For Ya! Is funny, intelligent and musical.. like a jazz riff or a good rap with plenty of rythm and poetry…It’s also the last live performance of one of the greatest comedians and social critics ever to walk the planet. A wise old man telling it like it is and sharing his point of view for one last time…A rare dose of truth and a treat for anyone, at anytime in any sort of place, enjoy!”

Ivani:Portishead’s Dummy is emotionally devastating…soul destroying…mind melting…the vulnerability of Beth Gibbons‘ vocals…those weird noises in the mix that automatically make you think of 50’s sci-fi B-movies…that drum beat on Numb…and this loneliness…it just won’t leave me alone…a lady of war…ends.”

BertieThe La’s self titled, one and only album. All killer no filler. And it’s only 35 minutes long so you won’t get piles.”

Winner!

Paulus: : “It’s difficult to overstate Planxty by Planxty  (the original eponymous black album from about 1973) and its influence and importance. It set Irish traditional music on a new and expanded footing. Its four founding members; Donal Lunny, Andy Irvine, Christy Moore and the recently deceased Liam O’Flynn each remain(ed) at the top of their game, and with varying styles, throughout their musical careers. Listened through in one sitting now, it’s like a history lesson in the evolution of contemporary Irish trad.”

Thanks all.

Last week: Playing The Album In Full

Golden Discs