Tag Archives: Ireland


For the weekend that’s in it.

Adultrock’s Gavin Elsted unleashes an off-your-chops rendition of Put Em’ Under Pressure.

Yokes kick in after two minutes.

Yay!

Via Nialler9

Meanwhile….

 

This saucy choon (above) remains the favourite of the tournament in Karl’s den the ‘sheet office.

Euro 2016 songs to broadsheet@broadsheet.ie marked “For your consideration”

This evening.

Ireland have booked a date with the host nation France, in the knockout stages of Euro 2016.

Robbie Brady (top) headed home against Italy following a tense, dodgy ref-packed 85 minutes and 30 seconds.

No slip-ups, we go again..

Final score: Italy 0 Ireland 1 

Meanwhile..

Squee!

Thanks Hugh

UEFA Euro 2016 

Meanwhile…

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Taoiseach Enda Kenny speaking incorrectly about the 8th amendment in the Dáil earlier this month

Emer O’Toole, in today’s Irish Times, writes:

Ireland’s abortion regime is a kind of a fiction. It can only exist if its proponents resolutely refuse to see, overwriting fact with fairy stories.

Our laws effectively make the “unborn” a citizen from the moment of implantation, thus requiring an act of creativity to furnish the embryo with thoughts and feelings, or perhaps, dependent on one’s religious proclivities, an ideologically convenient soul.

Our fictions proclaim Ireland abortion free, when it has approximately the same abortion rates as other EU countries. We just like to torture the women a bit first: for moral reasons, you understand.

…We can expect of Kenny’s convention, in short, the same kind of “balance” we have come to expect of our national broadcaster: the kind that considers the issue of whether women should have human rights to have two equally reasonable sides; the kind that gives serious consideration to people who actively campaign to subject women to cruel and degrading treatment and calls this – incredibly – “fairness”.

This impartiality is also a fiction.

Emer O’Toole: What can we expect of Enda Kenny’s abortion convention? (Irish Times)

Previously: ‘The People Decided To Keep That Reference In The Constitution’


Keep your fancy beers and luxurious chocolates.

Ireland were comprehensively beaten by Belgium this afternoon in Bordeuax.

We need divine intervention a result against the already qualified Italians now.

Final score: Ireland 0 Belgium 3 (three)

UEFA Euro 2016

Ken Early: Reality check for Ireland as Red Devils run riot (Irish Times) 

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Taoiseach Enda Kenny at the opening of a new €150million data centre at Google’s offices in Dublin yesterday

Dara Doyle and Stephanie Bodoni, of Bloomberg, report:

Near the top of the agenda [in Brussels] for investors continues to be the European Commission’s probe into Apple Inc.’s tax arrangements in Ireland, with both the company and the Irish authorities bracing for a decision that the Irish provided the iPhone maker with illegal state aid through a sweetheart deal.

In the first clues to a firm timeline for a decision on a probe which opened in 2014, Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan told Bloomberg on Thursday in Luxembourg that the commission may publish a decision sometime in July, though “we don’t know that with certainty.”

…There’s a range of estimates out there. In a worst-case scenario, Apple may face a $19 billion bill if the government ultimately loses and is forced to recoup tax from the company, according to JPMorgan Chase & Co. analyst Rod Hall. Matt Larson of Bloomberg Intelligence puts the figure at more than $8 billion.

Who gets the cash? Notionally, Ireland, even though the government says it doesn’t want it.

Why doesn’t Ireland want the cash, which after all could be equivalent to about all of the nation’s corporate tax last year? There’s a bigger picture, here, according to briefing notes provided to the incoming finance minister last month; a negative decision would hurt the country’s reputation and create uncertainty around it’s tax offering, which has been a key factor in drawing companies like Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. to Dublin.

Ireland and Apple Brace for the Worst as Tax Endgame Nears (Bloomberg)

Rollingnews


Ireland’s under 20s have beaten New Zealand 33-24 this afternoon in Manchester at the World Rugby U20s Championship.

They join the senior women’s team in having the honour of beating the All Blacks at test level.

Laces out Johnny.

Update:

Meanwhile, in South Africa.


Final score: South Africa 20 Ireland 26

Pic: Irish Rugby

World Rugby U20 Championship

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UN logo; Amanda Mellet and her husband James Burke

The United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner writes:

A woman in Ireland [Amanda Mellet] who was forced to choose between carrying her foetus to term, knowing it would not survive, or seeking an abortion abroad was subjected to discrimination and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment as a result of Ireland’s legal prohibition of abortion, UN experts have found.

The independent experts, from the Geneva-based Human Rights Committee, issued their findings after considering a complaint by the woman, AM, who was told in November 2011 when she was in the 21st week of pregnancy that her foetus had congenital defects, which meant it would die in the womb or shortly after birth.

This meant she had to choose “between continuing her non-viable pregnancy or travelling to another country while carrying a dying foetus, at personal expense and separated from the support of her family, and to return while not fully recovered,” the Committee said.

AM decided to travel to the UK for a termination and returned 12 hours after the procedure as she could not afford to stay longer. The UK hospital did not provide any options regarding the foetus’s remains and she had to leave them behind. The ashes were unexpectedly delivered to her three weeks later by courier.

In Ireland, she was denied the bereavement counselling and medical care available to women who miscarry. Such differential treatment, the Committee noted, failed to take into account her medical needs and socio-economic circumstances and constituted discrimination.

“Many of the negative experiences she went through could have been avoided if (she) had not been prohibited from terminating her pregnancy in the familiar environment of her own country and under the care of health professionals whom she knew and trusted,” the Committee wrote in its findings.

The Committee said that, in addition to the shame and stigma associated with the criminalization of abortion of a fatally ill foetus, AM’s suffering was aggravated by the obstacles she faced in getting information about the appropriate medical options.

Ireland’s Abortion Information Act allows healthcare providers to give patients information about abortion, including the circumstances under which abortion services can be available in Ireland or overseas.

But under the law they are prohibited from, and could be sanctioned for, behaviour that could be interpreted as advocating or promoting the termination of pregnancy. This, according to the Committee, has a chilling effect on health-care providers, who struggle to distinguish “supporting” a woman who has decided to terminate a pregnancy from “advocating” or “promoting” abortion.

Ireland, which is a State party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), is obliged to provide AM with an effective remedy, including adequate compensation and psychological treatment she may need, the Committee said. Ireland is also obliged to prevent similar violations from occurring.

To this end, the State party should amend its law on voluntary termination of pregnancy, including if necessary its Constitution, to ensure compliance with the Covenant, including effective, timely and accessible procedures for pregnancy termination in Ireland, and take measures to ensure that health-care providers are in a position to supply full information on safe abortion services without fearing being subjected to criminal sanctions,” the Committee’s findings said.

In its observations to the Committee on AM’s claims, Ireland said that the country’s constitutional and legislative framework reflected “the nuanced and proportionate approach to the considered views of the Irish Electorate on the profound moral question of the extent to which the right to life of the foetus should be protected and balanced against the rights of the woman.”

The Human Rights Committee considered this case under the First Optional Protocol to the ICCPR Covenant which gives the Committee competence to examine individual complaints.

Read the UN’s findings in full here

Related: Ireland abortion laws breach human rights, rules UN (The Times Ireland edition)

Previously: Another Victory For ‘Balance’

‘It’s A Sensitive Issue That Must Be Teased Out Very Carefully’

Fresh Claims Against Ronan Mullen

Pic: Jyllands-Posten International