Tag Archives: irish times

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Judith Goldberger writes:

Despite all the MSM huffing and puffing about fake news and the po-faced sanctimony of media platforms such as the Irish Times, the Irish Times still publishes something they admit is not verified by a 3rd party independently. Oh, but it says “purported”. That’s OK then, innit? It’s all clicks…

Fight!

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Independent 4 Change TDs Mick Wallace and Clare Daly at a meeting of the Joint Committee on Justice and Equality last October

Today.

Independent 4 Change TD Mick Wallace, in The Irish Times, writes:

Not surprisingly, the weak legislation establishing the Policing Authority has resulted in a weak Policing Authority in practice. The body was supposed to have responsibility for senior appointments from the outset, but this was delayed till January 2017. In the vacuum, Garda Commissioner Nóirín O’Sullivan has appointed more than 40 senior officers.

The Garda Commissioner still remains exclusively accountable to the Minister for Justice, and the Police Authority cannot even issue policy directives. Does that sound independent? Shockingly, after 10 days, the authority broke its silence to endorse the Garda Commissioner, which amounts to an effective slap in the face to Sgt McCabe and other whistleblowers.

O’Sullivan’s statements in public are at complete odds with her actions in private. In October 2016, she told the Oireachtas Justice Committee that “anyone who brings forward issues and concerns will be supported”.

But Garda Nick Keogh made his protected disclosure on May 8th, 2014, to the then confidential recipient, Judge Pat McMahon. Following that, he was subjected to five internal investigations.

Readers will recall how Garda Keogh has been on sick leave since December 2015.

Mick Wallace: To change An Garda, get rid of its hierarchy (The Irish Times)

Previously: New Mick’s Tape

You’ll Get Nothing From Me

‘Why Are Nine Garda Whistleblowers Out Sick?’

Protecting Disclosures

nick-pell

Writer Nick Pell

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Gulp.

Part of a glossary of terms compiled by Ireland-based, America-born writer Nick Pell for the Irish Times prompting a violent Twitter backlash.

The alt-right movement: everything you need to know (Nick Pell, Irish Times)

Meanwhile…

pell

Meanwhile…

1

Irish Times, December 23, 2014

2

Irish Times, this morning

Judith Goldberger writes:

And this year’s Rosita Boland award for smugness about those wanting to help others goes to fellow columnist Kathy Sheridan, safe in the cosy office across the street from Apollo House…

Good Times.

Kathy Sheridan: Beware the seductive simplicity of Apollo House (Irish Times)

Is a school sleepout best way to raise awareness of homelessness? (Rosita Boland, Irish Times, December 23, 2014)

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Current and former employees of Independent News and Media (INM) and their supporters demonstrating against significant pension cuts at INM in Dublin on Monday

As a great-granddaughter of William Martin Murphy – founder of Independent News & Media (INM) – I and many of his relatives are shocked and disgusted at the behaviour of the board of INM in reference to the pension debacle.

Murphy was a fair and honest man and would never have taken away his workers’ pension rights. As a country we seem to have lost decency in a lot of business behaviour.

Ann Young,
Newcastle,
Co Wicklow.

INM pension scandal (The Irish Times letters page)

Previously: A Curtain Fall

Rollingnews

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From top: Bill Kenneally; Irish Times Weekend cover from last Saturday; victim Paul Walsh, human rights lawyer Darragh Mackin, victim Colin Power and victim Jason Clancy

You may recall how the victims of paedophile Bill Kenneally – an accountant from a well-known Fianna Fáil family and basketball coach in Waterford – want a Commission of Investigation.

They believe senior gardai, members of Fianna Fáil, members of the Catholic Church and staff at the South Eastern Health Board failed to act when told about the abuse.

Kenneally was convicted earlier this year, after victim Jason Clancy came forward in 2012, but Gardaí knew about the abuse as far back as 1985.

Further to this…

Saoirse McGarrigle writes:

Last Saturday, The Irish Times published an article by Peter McGuire in which Mr McGuire asked sex abuse victims, abusers and therapists ‘is there a better way to tackle’ the issue of sex abuse in Ireland.

While journalists are not allowed to speak directly with prisoners in Ireland, Bill Kenneally – who was jailed for 14 years in February of this year – was interviewed through an intermediary.

He pleaded guilty to ten sample counts of indecent assault on ten boys between October 31, 1984 and December 31, 1987.

Judge Eugene O’Kelly handed down a 17-month sentence for each of the charges – prompting his victim’s to describe the sentence as “poetic justice” as, they say, he had a fixation with the number seven.

He would give them amounts of money that always ended in seven – £7, £17 or £27.

The Waterford accountant and basketball coach is now appealing the severity of his sentence.

The article in The Irish Times quoted an intermediary saying of Kenneally, “He grew up with a highly critical father he could never please and lacks any self-esteem.”

Colin Power (45) was abused by Kenneally for three years.

He said: “This is no excuse for abusing children, absolutely no excuse. Everybody has had difficulties in their lives, but nobody can use that as an excuse to abuse children. It’s an easy way out to blame his father. It’s a cop out as far as I am concerned. He caused devastation to all our lives and the lives of our families and friends. What he did will stay with all of us forever. He knew exactly what he was doing.”

The intermediary also says that Kenneally claims he did not abuse after 1987 and that “Bill knows he is a pariah, and he hates himself for what he has done.”

But Colin said: “If he was so remorseful and concerned about the children he abused and the impact on the abused he wouldn’t have waited 30 years until the guards came to him. He is sorry only because he was found out. All this is only a way of helping his appeal. And if he really was genuinely remorseful he would be honest about the amount of boys he abused.”

Since the court case, a number of men have approached the five victims who waived their anonymity; Jason Clancy, Paul Walsh, Barry Murphy, Kevin Keating and Colin Power, and revealed to them that they also were abused.

“He said ten victims and that he stopped after 1987, I can say categorically with absolute certainty that he abused far more than ten boys.”

The father-of-four continued: “I was in SuperValu last night and I met a fella in there and he said ‘you know, I think you’re great’. He told me that he was abused as well and it had an awful impact on his life. He had problems with gambling and drinking. He said to me that this had pushed him to go and sort it out.”

He added: “When we were driving to Dublin to meet MEP Lynn Boylan recently to discuss the case we stopped at an Applegreen on the way and I saw a guy there who was abused as well. You can’t just walk in town without seeing a number of people who have been abused. It’s everywhere – a whole generation of men in Waterford who have been abused.”

Colin continued: “I was just talking to a fella last night. He was also abused, but doesn’t know whether to come forward or not. He has low self-esteem because he hasn’t come forward. He feels like he has to but doesn’t know if he can. And I get that. Looking back at myself this time last year, I don’t know how I would have coped if I didn’t have Jason and the other lads. I wouldn’t have coped without them. Biggest thing for me was meeting up with the lads and talking about it. Feeling that you’re not normal.”

“It’s been an extremely hard thing to do. But I am glad that I have done it. I think before I thought that I was living normally. But I wasn’t. It was an abnormal life. It’s only through getting help that you can work it all out.”

Kenneally also claims that he stopped coaching basketball in 1987 and kept a “low-profile” to evade prosecution for the crimes committed before 1987.

Colin said: “He says that he stopped coaching basketball in 1987, but in 2013 he was definitely still involved in a basketball club. He was even on the committee. He still had access to young people. Sure it was the reason that Jason went to the guards in the first place in November 2012.”

The garda investigation which led to his conviction this year was triggered when father-of-four and local businessman Jason Clancy made a complaint to Waterford Garda Station in November 2012.

While the Book of Evidence states that the 46-year-old was compelled to come forward on foot of the Jimmy Saville case, he says that he told gardaí he did so because he was “extremely distressed” when he realised that his abuser was “still active in a basketball club, which had a predominantly young male membership.”

Kenneally told the intermediary that he “wishes gardaí had done so (prosecuted him) in the 1980s”.

His victims believe this is “more than just a bit ironic”.

Seven men are now pushing for a Commission of Investigation into who knew about the abuse and “turned a blind eye”.

They say that senior gardaí, members of Fianna Fáil, the South Eastern Health Board and the Catholic Church all knew that Kenneally was abusing boys but failed to stop him.

In 1987, he admitted to gardaí that he was handcuffing, blind-folding and sexually abusing boys, but he was let walk free.

Victims say that two boys were getting counselling from a health board psychiatrist for abuse they had suffered, while Kenneally was continuing to abuse others.

Bill Kenneally’s uncle Billy Kenneally, who was a serving Fianna Fáil TD at the time, was the first person superintendent Sean Cashman contacted when a local businessman made a complaint alleging that his son had been abused by Kenneally. He called the politician before he contacted the accused for questioning.

“What we’re looking for is all of this to be investigated and now ironically we have the man at the heart of it all, the abuser who was protected, saying that he even wishes he’d been prosecuted in the 1980s. Basically he wishes that he hadn’t been allowed to walk free for 30 years…so in effect he’s ironically supporting what we’re calling for,” said another victim Paul Walsh (45).

Human rights lawyer Darragh Mackin last month wrote to the Minister for Justice calling for a Commission of Investigation.

He confirmed this week that he has now received correspondence stating that the Minister has “sought the views of the Garda Commissioner on the issues raised.”

The letter also advises the victims that they can refer the matter to GSOC if they wish to “make a complaint concerning Garda actions”.

Mr Mackin said: “We welcome the Minister’s confirmation, that immediate action has been taken.”

He added: “It is however clear that this is only an initial scoping exercise, in the grand scheme of what is required to effectively investigate the systemic issues. We will continue to liaise with the Minister’s Office to ensure that the Gardai, given their involvement, play no part in the investigation given the need for independence to comply with International law.”

Paul Walsh added that he is “anxious” that any investigation that takes place is “entirely independent”.

The gardaí cannot investigate themselves that just wouldn’t work. We wouldn’t accept that. But also it has to be understood that it’s not just the gardaí that we want to be looked at, the health board knew what was happening to us, so did people in Fianna Fáil and the Catholic Church.”

The victims are set to meet with leader of Fianna Fáil Micháel Martin this Monday to discuss their campaign.

Waterford TD Mary Butler has refused to respond when contacted.

This week John McGuinness, from Kilkenny, became the first Fianna Fáil deputy to pledge his support to their campaign.

“John McGuinness seems very supportive and I hope other in Fianna Fáil will follow suit. This is not political. It’s just a case of letting the truth about what happened to us come out. I met with John this week and he said ‘it’s not just about ye, it’s the ripple effect that it’s had on our families’ and he’s right there it’s had a devastating effect on everybody. My mother asks me all of the time am I ok,” said Colin.

Saoirse McGarrigle is a broadcast journalist with South East Radio.

‘I was eight when my brother started coming into my room’ (Peter McGuire, Irish Times, Saturday, October 15, 2016)

Previously: Protected For 30 Years

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Amid speculation that Brexit may lead to higher house prices in Dublin, your headline asks “Will Dublin’s property market benefit from the vote to leave EU?”

Your definition of the word “benefit” clearly differs from mine.

Colm O’Connor,
Stoneybatter,
Dublin 7.

Meanwhile.

On the front page of yesterday’s Irish Times

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Thirty.

Two.

Dublin property prices (Irish Times letters page)