Tag Archives: Leo Varadkar

This morning.

Government Buildings, Merrion Street, Dublin 2

A protest from Inner City Helping Homeless as Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and ministers arrive for a Cabinet meeting at the start of the new Dáil term.

Sam Boal/Rollingnews

Leo Varadkar at a recital of Christmas carols by Department of the Taoiseach’s staff choir this afternoon

Eamonn Kelly, responding to comments from his post on homelessness on Friday (What Shall We Freeze?), writes:

I can see the role of supply and demand in the whole homeless crisis, as some of the comments have pointed out, but I find it a bit tragic that we appear to be so helpless against market forces. I don’t think we are. I think the government chooses to believe we are helpless and uses this impression as an excuse to do nothing.

They don’t do anything about imposing some kind of rent freeze. They don’t do anything about building social housing. They throw us all on the mercy of the market, standing over a system that is seeing Irish people dying on the streets of Dublin. And they are doing nothing to prevent this.

If there was a will to prevent or deal with homelessness there would be no homelessness, but there is no will. And that was most apparent at the dismal turnout for the Dail debate on the issue. No ideas are put forward.

For instance, off the top of my head, as some kind of recompense for providing tax avoidance loop holes for multi-national companies, you could factor in a deal that they build social housing or worker housing, like industrialists did in the 19th century.

Something like this could be done if solving homelessness was a priority at political level.

But it’s not just the government to blame for this neglect. It is, apparently, the majority of Irish people supporting these policies with their silence.

It seems that a consensus has  been quietly arrived at that we can afford to “lose a few” in pursuit of economic recovery. And besides, the new Taoiseach is kind of trendy looking. That’s progress too, in a way.

And the media too, in a wrong-headed approach to increasing economic confidence they are exaggerating the recovery. That 10.5% I mentioned in the original article, as trumpeted by the Irish Times, had become, by the RTE News at 9, “just under 12%”.

The effect of these exaggerations, as one commentator pointed out, is to attract emigrants back into a system that literally can’t accommodate them, returning due to a falsely raised hope of a recovery more advanced than it actually is, piling even more pressure onto the creaking system.

Lots of people are doing really well from the upsurge in private rents. It’s not just anonymous international vulture capitalists driving this. It’s “ordinary” Irish people too.

It’s so cruel and heartless, and justified in the main on prejudicial thinking, that sometimes it crosses your mind that the entrenched Irish establishment is made up mainly of those who survived the famine.

When I framed the question in the title of the original piece, What Shall We Freeze? I didn’t have a ready answer. I was being a bit cute. But an answer came to me hours later. What shall we freeze? Our hearts. We must freeze our hearts for the sake of the economy’s health. It’s the only way forward.

Happy Christmas and a prosperous New Year to all. May you never have to make your bed out in the cold.

Eamonn Kelly is a freelance writer

Previously: What Shall We Freeze?

Earlier: Not Just For Christmas

This morning.

At the former Longfields Hotel on Fitzwilliam Street Lower, Dublin 2.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Minister for Housing Eoghan Murphy launched a new homeless facility containing 30 permanent emergency beds which will be managed by the Simon Community from tonight.

In a press release, Mr Murphy said:

This Christmas, there will be over 200 additional permanent emergency beds, with wrap around medical and other required supports in place for those who unfortunately are homeless and need our help.

“…The rough sleeper count, which the Dublin Region Homeless Executive published last month, reported a total of 184 rough sleepers across the Dublin region on the night of the 7th November 2017.

“The 200 permanent emergency beds, which the Government have now delivered, mean that an emergency bed and shelter will be available for those who need them.

“Today, the Taoiseach, Leo Varadkar and I were pleased to visit 30 of the new permanent emergency beds at Longfields, Fitzwilliam Street, which the Simon Community will operate and manage.

Additional 200 emergency beds and the Cold Weather Initiative (Rebuilding Ireland)

Rollingnews

As EU leaders agree to move on to Phase 2 of Brexit talks…

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Minister for European Affairs Helen McEntee hold a press conference (above)…

How is that going?

EU leaders agree to move to second-stage Brexit talks – Politics Live (The Guardian)

Yikes.

Stefanie Preissner

UPDATE:

Saturday.

O’Connell Street, Dublin 1

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar (centre) flanked by Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe (left) and Minister for Transport Shane Ross at the New Broombridge Luas Tram – Cross City Station as Luas Cross city brought the Green line and the red line together for the first time.

You see?

He’ s a real man of the peo…

Oh.

Trinity College Undergraduate Scarf (Trinity College)

Rollingnews

Thanks JK

British prime Minister Theresa May and European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker this morning

This morning.

Brussels, Belgium.

Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said he believes the breakthrough needed has been made, and is sure the EU27 will open Phase 2 of Brexit talks.

Speaking at a joint press conference with British Prime Minister Theresa May in Brussels, Mr Juncker said the Uk has made significant commitments on avoiding a hard border between Ireland and the UK.

But he warned there is still a lot of work to be done.

The Commission president said: “I will always be sad about this development, but now we must start looking to the future, a future in which the UK will remain a close friend and ally.”

Mrs May said the deal agreed today is a significant improvement from Monday and the joint report is in the best interests of the whole of the UK.

She said that “we guarantee there will be no hard border in Ireland” and “we will uphold the Belfast Agreement”.

May and Juncker agree to Brexit deal (RTÉ)

Meanwhile…

More as we get it.

Update:

From left: Helen McEntee, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Simon Coveney

Government Buildings.

“Today is a very significant day for Ireland and the EU. After long & intensive negotiations we have reached a satisfactory conclusion on the Irish issues including the border…

…We have achieved all we set out to achieve in Phase 1. This is not the end but it is the end of the beginning. The Good Friday Agreement is fully protected & the Common Travel Area will continue. The UK is committed to avoiding a hard border.”

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, this morning.


UPDATE:

Hmm.

RTÉ reports:

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar is to make a make a a “positive statement to the country to provide reassurance on Brexit” within the next hour, according to the Tánaiste.

Simon Coveney said that an agreement on the wording around the issue of a border on the island of Ireland is very close.

He said that progress was made this morning and the discussions are moving in the right direction. Mr Coveney added that he hopes there will be an agreement on a “balanced wording” in the next hour.

Mr Varadkar is to make a public statement on Phase 1 of the Brexit negotiations at 2.30pm.

The Tánaiste said he believes the border between Ireland and the UK will not change from how it appears today.

“I suspect it will look very like what it looks like today which is to remain largely an invisible border, with no barriers to movement and trade and the normality on the island of Ireland, as we’ve grown to appreciate over the last 20 years,” he said.

Taoiseach to make ‘positive statement’ on Brexit talks (RTE)

Meanwhile…

The Guardian reports:

“The British government appears to have bowed to the Republic of Ireland’s demand that Northern Ireland will stay aligned with key EU laws and regulations after Brexit so as to ensure that a hard border does not return to the island.

“According to sources, MEPs were told by the chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, that Theresa May had conceded after days of intense talks that the province would be treated as a special case.”

A draft of the text of a 15-page joint statement between the European commission and the British government is said to include a commitment in paragraph 48 that “in the absence of agreed solutions the UK will ensure that there continues to be continued regulatory alignment” with the internal market and customs union.

MEPs say UK has conceded on Ireland border in Brexit talks (The Guardian)

Rollingnews

UPDATE:

UPDATE:

UPDATE:



Update:

Oh.


From left: Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, Heather Humphries, new Minister for Business, Enterprise & Innovation, Josepha Madigan, new Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht and new Tanáiste Simon Coveney, who also remains as Minister for Foreign Affairs

This afternoon.

Government Buildings, Dublin 2

*smirk*

Pic via Simon Coveney

More as we get it

Rollingnews

Meanwhile…

Madigan eh?

From top: Taoiseach Leo Varadkar; Sgt Maurice McCabe

On January 8, 2018, the Disclosures Tribunal, overseen by Supreme Court judge Peter Charleton, will resume.

The tribunal is mainly investigating allegations of a smear campaign against Garda whistleblower Sgt Maurice McCabe.

It had been expected to hear allegations of former head of the Garda Press Office Dave Taylor – who has claimed that he was instructed to negatively brief journalists about Sgt McCabe.

But Justice Charleton released a statement last Friday to say the tribunal’s next module will focus on the former Garda Commissioner Noirin O’Sullivan’s legal strategy at the O’Higgins Commission.

Broadsheet has learned Taoiseach Leo Varadkar will appear as a witness and give evidence.

As Minister for Transport, Mr Varadkar defended Sgt McCabe’s actions as ‘distinguished’.

He told a road safety conference in March, 2014:

“I think it is very important to bear in mind that the Garda whistleblowers only released information about people after they tried to use the correct procedures and those procedures failed them and when they did release the information, they did it through Oireachtas members which is provided for under the Garda Act of 2005.”

Mr Vardkar thanked Sgt McCabe and fellow Garda whistleblower, John Wilson:

“…on my own behalf and on behalf of the thousands of families who have had to endure the pain and loss that flows from the death of a loved one on the road.”

A Government press officer said he could not confirm if Mr Varadkar would appear as a witness. He said: “This is a matter for the tribunal.”

A spokesman for the Disclosures Tribunal said:

“I can’t confirm one way or the other whether Mr Varadkar or anybody else is going to be a witness at the tribunal in the next module. So you will have to wait for a witness list to go up [on the tribunal’s website].

“The work, as such, of the tribunal would be confidential. So until the witness list goes up, you wouldn’t be able to say whether anybody is going to be a witness at the next module or who would be a witness at the next module.”

Readers may recall how in May 2016, it emerged that, at the privately held O’Higgins Commission of Investigation, held during 2015, the then Garda Commissioner Noirin O’Sullivan employed a legal strategy which attacked the credibility and motivation of Sgt McCabe.

In February 2017, just prior to the establishment of the Disclosures Tribunal and when there was talk of setting up a second commission of inquiry involving Sgt McCabe, he and his wife Lorraine McCabe made a statement.

They said:

“Today, we have heard one Minister, Simon Harris, state that we are entitled to “truth and justice”.

We wish to make it clear that we are definitely not agreeable to that entitlement being wholly postponed so that another Commission of Inquiry can conduct a secret investigation behind closed doors and make a report, into which we have no input as of right, in nine or eighteen months’ time.

“We are entitled to the truth today – justice can follow in its wake.

“… the public has little or no appreciation of what was done, and attempted to be done, to Maurice in the course of its hearings.”

Last week it emerged that an email of May 15, 2015 circulated to the former Minister for Justice and other justice officials which should have been sent to the Disclosures Tribunal wasn’t sent.

Sgt McCabe told Mr Varadkar in a phonecall that evening that the sequence of events alleged in the email did not happen and that the transcripts of the O’Higgins Commission of Investigation will prove this.

Following a call by Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, for the Department of Justice to do another search for documents relevant to the tribunal, further emails were found and subsequently sent to the Disclosures Tribunal.

The email thread showed, among other things, how, on Saturday, July 4, 2015, the former Garda Commissioner Noirin O’Sullivan phoned the Department of Justice Secretary General Office Assistant Secretary Ken O’Leary to tell him a press query about the stance taken by An Garda Siochana against Sgt McCabe at the O’Higgins Commission of Investigation had been sent to the Garda Press Office.

The garda weren’t commenting on the matter.

Mr O’Leary subsequently advised the then Minister for Justice Frances Fitzgerald on what to say, if she was asked about the matter during a scheduled interview on RTE’s This Week on Sunday, July 5.

In the end, Ms Fitzgerald wasn’t asked about it.

Amid these revelations, the Tanaiste and former Minister for Justice Frances Fitzgerald has resigned.

Of her resignation, Mr Varadkar told the Dail he accepted her resignation with regret and that “It is my strong view that a good woman is leaving office without getting a full and fair hearing”.

The Secretary General of the Department of Justice Noel Waters yesterday announced that he’s resigning with immediate effect as opposed to next February – which he announced last week on the same day the May 15, 2015 email surfaced.

Meanwhile, questions remain over the current Minster for Justice Charlie Flanagan’s handling of related matters.

Readers will also recall how, on March 20, 2014, when Mr Varadkar called Sgt McCabe and Garda Wilson “distinguished”, he also called on the then Garda Commissioner Martin Callinan to withdraw his “disgusting” remark in relation to the two men.

Mr Callinan made that remark at a meeting of the Public Accounts Committee in January 2014.

Previously: Disclosures, Discrepancies And Paul Williams

Graphic Disclosures

Rollingnews