Tag Archives: Little Museum of Dublin

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You may recall a post on the launch of photographer Wally Cassidy’s book ‘The Other Half Lives’ in May which covered Dublin between 1989 and 1993.

Well.

For the first time, the photographs from the book are on display – in the Little Museum of Dublin.

Jill Guest writes:

“The Other Half Lives provides a fascinating insight into a time when Ireland was struggling to define itself. Loosely grouped into four sections – street, protest, Smithfield and punks – this honest and arresting collection brings us face-to-face with an Ireland we may prefer to forget but in many ways is still with us today.”

The exhibition runs until September 7.

Previously: Wally’s People

Little Museum of Dublin

As always, no favours, cuddles, or pictures were given for this post.

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Dublin’s GPO after the 1916 Easter Rising

Can this possibly end well?

The Little Museum of Dublin writes:

We are delighted to announce a commissioning programme to produce artworks for public exhibit at the Little Museum in 2016. Inviting artists who work in any media, this exciting project will see the museum commission small scale art projects to commemorate the 1916 Rising, intersecting with present-day perspectives on commemoration, remembrance and the function of history as a component of civic awareness.

As a cultural institution whose primary goal is educational, the Little Museum is wary of providing simplistic accounts of the past. The archivist Catriona Crowe has spoken of the need to complicate the narrative during this decade of commemorations. With that in mind, we want to create audacious public interventions that provoke, educate and entertain.

To introduce our commissioning programme, curator Simon O’Connor will host a public information evening in the museum on Thursday 7th August at 6pm. Artists and interested members of the public are invited to attend.

FIGHT!

The Little Museum 2016 Commissioning Programme (Little Museum of Dublin)

Pic: Humphrys

Achtung Baby signed by Bono[U2's Achtung Baby, 1991 by Steve Averill]

Tonight, at the Little Museum of Dublin, Lisa Godson [of the National College of Art and Design] charts the development of U2’s visual aesthetic with the band’s album sleeve designer  Steve Averill.

The event, called ‘Stealing Hearts at a Travelling Show’, will begin at 7pm.

Tickets cost €11.30 (including tax booking fee and WINE reception, and can be purchased here.

Little Museum of Dublin

Myers

The Little Museum of Dublin, on St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin, are having journalist and author Padraig Yeates and former Irish Independent, now Sunday Times columnist Kevin Myers (above) over to talk about the 1913 Lockout.

The museum people say:

“Kevin Myers will open with a controversial reappraisal of Strumpet City, this year’s One City One Book, long the definitive narrative of the events of 1913. Myers will argue that the book is ”the moral inspiration for the disaster that was the Croke Park deal,” in a blistering critique of the second most celebrated Dublin novel.

“Lockout: 1913 author, Yeates, will then revisit the industrial dispute that made William Martin Murphy and Big Jim Larkin household names, and changed Dublin irrevocably.”

Mr Myers will speak at 5.30pm and Mr Yeates will speak at 7pm.

The Little Museum of Dublin: The Lockout Lectures

Pics: Padraig Yeates and NDRC

From an exhibition opening tonight (until January 30) in the Little Museum of Dublin, St Stephen’s Green of photographs taken by Brendan Walsh.

Brendan, whose Dublin collection spans 1972-1982, did his “apprenticeship” in Northern Ireland with Magnum photographer Evelyn Hofer.

Simon O’Connor at the Museum writes:

The photos are amazing – harrowing but really beautiful and very dignified. Brendan was also present taking shots at the famous Gregory Deal of 1982, some of those are in the exhibition too. Its unsurprising how relevant these photographs still are -  a people’s resilience in the face of a state’s failure to nurture them, a continuing hallmark of the city.

 

 Heart of the City 1972 – 1982 – Photographs Of Dublin’s North City Centre by Brendan Walsh (Little Museum of Dublin)

Spot the locations, anyone?