Tag Archives: noise

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Agro PhobiaDIY Limerick noise

What you may need to know…

01. In 1981/1982, teenagers Brian Hartnett and Barry Warner didn’t have much in the way of musical equipment with which to take out their frustrations. So they improvised.

02. AGRO PHOBIA was the result of the two lads bashing out noises on piano, Stylophone, and whatever household implements were handy at that moment. Rhythm tracks were recorded into one tape recorder, which was then played back as ambient backing audio for the duo’s improvisations.

03. Streaming above is Waiting Room, the first song to be publicly released from the duo’s FIRST CASSETTE, a compilation of the duo’s hitherto unreleased body of work.

04. FIRST CASSETTE releases digitally this week through The Unscene, a marked shift into noisier climes for the doggedly DIY hip-hop label.

Verdict: A time capsule, alternately harsh in its sparse, detached nature and poignant in the toll time has taken on the recordings, comforting in its layers of tape distortion.

The Unscene

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Gummidgenoise-rock from Galway

What you may need to know…

01. Grubby, gritty noise-rock foolishness is the order of the day for Gummidge, a trio from Gallimh, formed in 2010. You may remember them.

02. Releasing debut album Sick Again in 2012, the band has kept the home fires burning with work on Heartbreakers, a second LP released earlier this month and launched with a Galway gig.

03. Streaming above, available from the band’s Bandcamp. No formal physical release, but all digital purchases to receive liner notes in a card posted with each order.

04. Launching the new album in Dublin, at the Jigsaw arts space, next week on the 5th, with support from Ten Past Seven, 1, and Mercurius Forebrain.

Verdict: Angular, awkward, and noisy as ever. Grand job.

Gummidge

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PigsaspeopleFarewell show in Belfast tomorrow night

What you may need to know…

01. Post-hardcore and noise-rock were in order for Pigsaspeople, a three-piece from Belfast.

02. Emerging in 2012, the band quickly trotted out (hurr) their debut EP, The First Four Months before settling into recording Idles & Us, written around the same time and released the following year. Debut LP The Plot Against Future Plans, released in 2014, was an underrated slab of dissonance.

03. Streaming above is the band’s now-final single, 65 Symptoms, recorded at Start Together Studios and released as part of that studio’s Singles Club.

04. They bid farewell tomorrow night, after four years of activity, with a big show at Belfast’s Limelight 2.  Also on the bill are 7.5 Tonnes of Beard, Bosco Ramos, and No Great Loss. Fiiiiiilth.

Verdict: With no shortage of either sonic or thematic heaviness, the band leaves behind a solid body of work, built on a rake of riffs.

Pigsaspeople

Photo: Ciara McMullan

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WRY MYRRHappearing from the ether shortly

What you may need to know…

01. Comprised of composer/GASH Collective organiser Ellen King, and composer/Crevice member Irene Buckley, WRY MYRRH offers a sparse take on improv electronics, with sinister, brooding drone and noise inflections.

02. Debuting in January of this year at Cork’s Community Print Shop, the duo have since shared a stage with Sophie Cooper and the Tor Invocation Band.

03. Streaming above is TWO, one of two pieces currently uploaded to the project’s Soundcloud. Stay with it to the end.

04. Making an infrequent appearance at MMOTHS’ upcoming Cork date at the Triskel on the 30th, alongside Underling.

VERDICT: As exploratory as it is unsettling, WRY MYRRH’s minimalist improv is likely another experience again when immersed in it in a live situation.

WRY MYRRH

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Four buskers on Grafton Street, Dublin with their decibel levels

Shane D writes:

Further to all the Busking Noise Hullaballoo, some science is needed. I got interested in this one day during the summer when lots of buskers were out out of Grafton Street. I downloaded an app to measure decibels and which also allows you to take a photo of the source at the same time. The results were interesting.
The loudest busker I recorded was 93 decibels. That is almost four times louder than the average background street noise of about 74 decibels (The decibel scale is logarithmic). Most “miked-up” buskers came in at 90-92 decibels, though I once recorded one at 97 decibels! Non-boosted performers come in at 75-83 decibels. That is over five times times quieter than their electric cousins…