Tag Archives: Referendum

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A quarter of a million Irish citizens have emigrated since 2008.

70% of them are in their 20s.

Irish Diaspora Voting‘ facilitates unofficial democratic representation for Ireland’s diaspora allowing Irish citizens abroad to engage symbolically in Irish politics and ‘serve as evidence for the urgent need of an adequate postal voting system’

Kerry Guinan writes:

Here’s a handy new tool to circulate to the Irish abroad ahead of the marriage referendum and in lieu of an adequate postal voting system for diaspora. Its results will be published to provide a more accurate representation of Irish voting preferences, and to express a need to Government for a postal voting system

Vote here

Screen-Shot-2015-04-01-at-21.13.11Further to that.

A letter from FEARGUS all the way in Waikanae, New Zealand.

Sir, – I read Una Mullally’s piece “RTÉ referendum memo sends out the wrong message”, (Opinion & Analysis, April 6th) in disbelief. It is many years since I worked in RTÉ but the memo she reports is by my memory quite simply bog standard.

The only difference that separates this version from that issued in my own days there is the onward march of technology, to wit social media, so-called.

I thought the passage of time might have coloured my memory, but no.

I have checked with a friend, a former senior editorial executive, who has assured me that I remain compos mentisand “it’s a restatement of the usual”.

Ms Mullally is outraged. I see the memo differently.

First, it provides a protection to the RTÉ workforce.

Second, and by far the most important aspect of a long-standing policy, it offers – or is intended to offer – some assurance to the Irish public that the organisation and its broadcast services can be trusted to be what public representatives intended when, in 1960 and periodically since, they enacted and amended laws establishing and maintaining RTÉ as a national public service broadcaster. Specifically that voters can trust its coverage during a campaign.

The stopwatch and other aspects of RTÉ’s house policy on electoral and referendum coverage during the official contest period is not only “the usual”, it is necessary. This is not about the Angelus, “young researchers frightened about job security” or any other coats trailed in the piece.

It is about RTÉ and the law (the Broadcasting Acts) and integrity (RTÉ as a public service broadcaster) as they relate to the critical moment of the democratic exercise.

Voters deserve the assurance that neither a very powerful public body nor its staff are being anything other than scrupulously disinterested during the referendum campaign. I don’t know whatThe Irish Times policy is, though it appears to be different, but then it is not a public service. – Yours, etc,

FEARGUS Ó RAGHALLAIGH,

Sound, mind.

RTÉ and Referendum Coverage (Irish Times letters)

Previously: Friends, Colleagues, Freelancers, Cover Your Mouths

vote

Pro-same sex marriage group  Vote With Us offering voters a “chance to find and share reasons to vote yes in the upcoming referendum on marriage equality”.

NO hectoring.

Eoin Wison (not the actor) writes:

Vote With Us is an exciting new campaign for the yes and undecided voters. Referendum campaigns are often held hostage by the same commentators, playing out the debate out of reach of everyday people. We hope this campaign will hand the conversation back to Irish voters and allow them to positively engage others in a respectful and hopeful way, up and down the country

Vote With Us

90370869

DugDog writes:

I’m going to be away with work when the referendum is on. You know the one. I was wondering if I can still vote even though I’m out of the country?  I heard you can’t vote abroad unless you are a servant of the State, e.g diplomats and soldiers. Is it possible to vote by post or anything? I haven’t emigrated or anything. I still live here.

(Mark Stedman, Photocall)

Got a problem? Why not ask a Broadsheet reader? Broadsheet@broadsheet.ie

 

water-charges-no-leaflet

Campaign ‘literature’ for the No side in a recent water charges referendum
in Trinity College Dublin

Two weeks ago, a water charges referendum was held in Trinity College Dublin in order to give the Trinity College Dublin Students’ Union (TCDSU) an official position on the introduction of water charges.

The students were asked if they should campaign to abolish water charges.

Of the 4,619 who voted, 2,110 students (46%) voted ‘Yes’.

Further to this…

Liam Crowley writes in Trinity News:

“On the point of the referendum campaign, it must be pointed out that the ‘No’ side engaged in misleading and disingenuous tactics. The leaflets and posters issued by the ‘No’ campaign were designed along a myth/fact type of structure. It was presented as being a myth that ‘Irish water will be privatised’. The corresponding ‘fact’ was that ‘only the Irish people can decide to privatise Irish Water through a referendum.’ This is far removed from the truth.”

“The government has forcefully resisted all demands that the semi-state company ‘Irish Water’ be protected from privatisation by ensuring a referendum is provided in the case of any government wanting to sell the company. The Oireachtas, where a government majority is in-built, will be the place where any decision to privatise our water is taken.”

“Irish people could not have less control over our water than as it stands with the current formation of water charges. If privatisation of our water was not on the agenda, then a referendum would have been guaranteed in the event of possible water privatisation. The blatant untruth that currently a referendum is necessary for water privatisation should not have escaped college media scrutiny and the SU’s Electoral Commission should have acted decisively to stop the dissemination of false information.”

FIGHT!

What does the result of the water charges referendum say about Trinity students? (Liam Crowley, Trinity News)

Pic: Trinity News