Tag Archives: Social Democrats

 Dublin City Councillor with Social Democrats Gary Gannon and journalist Philip O’Connor

Stockholm-based journalist Philip O’Connor, of the blog Our Man in Stockholm, will be contending the selection convention of the Dublin Social Democrats branch for a run at the European Elections this May.

Social Democrats Dublin City Councillor Gary Gannon is also seeking a nomination to run in the European Elections for Dublin.

It follows reports in the Sunday Business Post on March 3, 2019, that it was understood Mr O’Connor was “in talks” with the party.

In the same newspaper, journalist Hugh O’Connell reported that Mr Gannon had threatened to quit the party if it decides to withdraw support from its local election candidate Ellie Kisyombe, following a report in the Sunday Times on February 17 concerning Ms Kisyombe’s background.

Mr Gannon told the newspaper:

“If Ellie is not a candidate for the Social Democrats, then neither will I be.”

FIGHT!

Pics: Philip O’Connor and Gary Gannon

Previously: Deep Purple


From left: Róisín Shortall TD, Annmarie McNally, Catherine Murphy TD, Carly Bailey, of the Social Democrats during the abortion referendum; Ellie Kisyombe

Aaron Rogan, in The Times Ireland edition, reports:

The Social Democrat branch running the election campaign of Ellie Kisyombe, a Malawian asylum seeker, has restated its support for her in spite of continued controversy.

The Sunday Times has reported that the two most senior executives of the party resigned after a disagreement over plans to hold an internal review into Ms Kisyombe’s background. The paper had reported that she had given journalists inaccurate information.

Joe O’Connor, the party chairman, and Carly Bailey, vice-chairwoman, resigned after a meeting of the party’s national executive on Friday at which the decision to hold the review was taken.

The pair had disagreed with Catherine Murphy and Róisín Shortall, the party’s TDs and co-leaders, who favoured a review. Yesterday Chris Bond, who represents Dublin South West on the national executive, resigned.

Separately…

Third Social Democrat quits over Ellie Kisyombe review (The Times Ireland edition)

Ellie Kisyombe

Ellie Kisyombe will run as a Social Democrat candidate in Dublin’s North Inner City in the local elections on May 24 next for a seat in Dublin City Council.

The Social Democrats write:

“Ellie Kisyombe came to Ireland from Malawi in 2010 and has spent the last eight years living in Direct Provision. During this time she’s lived through and witnessed the uncaring conditions people in this country’s asylum system experience.

Following a volunteering position with the Irish Refugee Council, Ellie co-founded Our Table in 2015 as a response to the ban on asylum seekers cooking for themselves and in order to give an outlet to her passion for food and cooking.

Our Table is as a community-based, non-profit project designed to highlight the need to end direct provision in Ireland. The project operates pop-up cafés in Dublin and provides catering services in the rest of the country.

Creativity, activism and entrepreneurship have been the foundations of Ellie’s life in both Ireland and Malawi – lessons and talents she hopes to bring to Dublin City Council.”

Further to Ellie getting a huge amount of support on Twitter last night, Ellie tweeted this morning:

I want to take this opportunity in thanking all of you for your great love and support!! I am not sure which right words to use!! Am speechless ❤ ( The community spirit) That’s what is known to me from Irish people am proud to be here! Ireland is home for me!! (Zikomo Kwambili)

Zikomo Kwambili?

Related: Ellie Kisyombe to be first female asylum seeker up for election (Sean Pollock, The Times Ireland edition, December 18, 2018)

Ellie Kisyombe

This evening.

Earlier…


From top: Social Democrat co-leaders Catherine Murphy (left) and Roisin Shorthall at Leinster House this morning; Social Democrat motion on the National Broadband Plan

This morning.

The Social Democrats have introduced a Dáil motion (above) – to be debated this evening – calling for a “Government commitment that any National Broadband Plan roll-out will prioritise affordability for homes and businesses in rural Ireland”.

Party co-leader Catherine Murphy TD said:

“People in rural Ireland are desperate for reliable and sustainable broadband but they will only be guaranteed such a service if we get the National Broadband plan contract award process right while we have this chance.

We have to ensure that the process of awarding the contract is totally beyond reproach. There is no point in going ahead with a process if, when the infrastructure is finally in place, an average household cannot afford to connect to the network.”

Deputy Murphy added:

“The problems we are now witnessing with the National Children’s Hospital for example are not the result of something that happened after the project began. They are the result of a laissez-faire approach to the original tendering and contract process.”

Previously: National Broadband Plan on Broadsheet

Social Democrat Dublin City Councillor Gary Gannon

As revealed by Dan Boyle last week.

Social Democrat Dublin City Councillor Gary Gannon will contest the European Elections in May if selected by his party….

Mr Gannon said he would contest the local elections even if he was chosen to run for Europe. He said the party would co-opt someone on to the council should he be successful in both election

Meanwhile…

FIGHT!

Gary Gannon seeks Social Democrats nomination to run in Europe (Irish Times)

Last Week: Dan Boyle: Europe Europe

This afternoon.

Royal College of Physicians Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2.

The Launch of the Labour Party’s alternative Budget 2019 document, Building A New Republic.

Above from left: Senator Aodhan O Riordain, Deputy leader Alan Kelly, Senator Ivana Bacik,  Labour Party leader Brendan Howlin, Senator Kevin Humphreys and Jan O Sullivan.

Labour to Launch Alternative Budger (Labour)

Rollingnews

Meanwhile…

 

This afternoon.

Government Buildings, Merrion Street, Dublin 2

Social Democrats member Catherine Stocker and her son Theo (top) joined the party’s co-leaders, Catherine Murphy and Róísín Shortall (above centre) alongside councillors and spokespeople during the launch of the Social Democrats Alternative Budget 2019.

Social Democrats

Leon Farrell/Rollingnews

Gulp.

This morning.

Leinster House, Kildare Street, Dublin 2

Fur farm-hating grim reapers greet returning TDs afte the Dáil Summer recess.

Rollingnews

Meanwhile…

Social Democrats TD Róisín Shortall and the party’s political director Anne Marie McNally on the plinth at Leinster House

This morning.

Outside Leinster House.

Social Democrats TD Roisin Shortall has called for an immediate rent freeze nationwide.

In a statement, Ms Shortall said:

“One of the worst effects of the housing crisis is that more and more people are relying on private rental accommodation. Rents are at record levels. According to DAFT, rents nationwide have risen by 75% since 2011 and are now 27% higher than their 2008 peak.”

The party’s political director Anne Marie McNally said:

“The Government needs to intervene now to stop rents sky-rocketing any further. We have to end this exploitation of renters and those priced out of the housing market. That objective should start with an inescapable nationwide rent freeze now.”

FIGHT!

Meanwhile…

The Dáil resumes this afternoon, following the summer recess, with Leaders’ Questions starting at 2pm.

Proceedings can be watched live here.

Pic: Social Democrats



This afternoon.

Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin

Members of the Social Democrats and their co-leader Roisin Shorthall TD at the party’s pre-Dáil think-In. The party said it will field candidates in “the majority of constituencies” in the next General Election.

Social Democrats expect to have 90 candidates in local elections (RTÉ)

Earlier; Anne Marie McNally: Can You Afford To Come Home?

Sam Boal/RollingNews

Joe Mulholland launching last year’s MacGill Summer School

This morning.

On RTÉ One’s Today With Seán O’Rourke show…

Dr Joe Mulholland, director of the MacGill Summer School in Donegal, joined Mr O’Rourke, while co-leader of the Social Democrats and TD Catherine Murphy was also on the line..

Dr Mulholland was responding to criticism of the predominance of men on the summer school’s panels.

Earlier, Ms Murphy and her co-leader Róisín Shortall said they wouldn’t take part in the event this year unless significant changes are made to the gender-balance of panels across all sessions.

From the interview…

Joe Mulholland: “There’s be at least one woman on every panel I think. So it’s, I suppose, it’s, if you want to say 25% roughly. And I know that this is not enough, of course. And efforts have been made by me, over the years, to balance, to have a better balance, gender balance, but then we have other balances that we look after as well, political balance or socio-economic, political balance and so on. So I have done my best, those who are close to me, who have advised me here in Dublin, on this programme, know that every time I see them, I say ‘let’s think about women’.”

Seán O’Rourke: “Yeah, well, what do you say to the comment made by Catherine Murphy, when you say ‘finding women with the right aptitude’, she finds that very offensive.”

Mulholland: “Well I think that was a wrong, it was, a call last night, fairly late, and pretty jaded, to be honest and that was a totally wrong term to use and I apologise for that and I withdraw it. It wasn’t what I meant. Maybe the right qualifications or whatever but it’s sometimes difficult and, I mean, the amount of women, the number of women who are on the programme does not represent the number of women who have been invited on to the programme but for whatever, for different reasons, just weren’t available. This is towards the end of July.

“It’s an extremely difficult time. Donegal is still quite a remote place. And it makes it difficult for a lot of people.”

O’Rourke: “Joe I’m looking at a tweet here from Sarah McInerney, a colleague here on the Late Debate and also presenter on TV3 or their politics show. She says that ‘Let’s see, MacGill. You could replace Stephen Collins with Geraldine Kennedy; Pat Cox with Catherine Day; Stephen Donnelly with Louise O’Reilly; Phillip Lane with Shannon Donnery – that’s in the Central Bank – David Quinn with Maria Steen and Fintan O’Toole with Justine McCarthy. Now there you are: one, two, three…that’s six.”

Mulholland: “Well, it’s not just a question of replacing those people. I mean, all have been chosen for whatever reasons, but it’s not as simple as that and a lot of time goes into this, as you can imagine of trying to get a programme that’s coherent, cohesive and, above all that, reflects, reflects social and economic and political life in Ireland. And, okay, I have failed obviously from the point of view of the gender balance.”

O’Rourke: “Just on the numbers, Mary O’Regan has done a tot, she’s the news editor in the Sunday Business Post, on your website. Fifty-two speakers of whom 12 are women. Catherine Murphy, are you not running the risk now, of yourself and Róisín Shortall’s withdrawal – that’ll make the balance even worse and it could ruin maybe and if other people do the same thing a really reputable and a fine, I mean it’s been making a contribution for what – 30 years or more?”

Catherine Murphy: “Yeah, Seán, I’ve spoken at the MacGill Summer School and we were very happy to do it in the past but I think that there’s a point where you do have to make a stand on something and I’m quite sure and I know Joe will have put a huge, and his team, will have put a huge amount of effort into the summer school. I don’t disagree with that. But the gender imbalance is so significant and if we’re talking about the future of Ireland and a new Europe, the challenges ahead, that can’t be done without women.

“Because they have been, they have not played a central role in so many ways in the design of the past. Your own wonderful programme last night on RTÉ – in terms of No Country For Women – really demonstrates that that has to change. And women have to be an equal part of this narrative.”

O’Rourke: “And to go back to Joe. Joe Mulholland, is there anything you can do, at this stage, to retrieve the situation?”

Mulholland: “Well I mean this, as I said to somebody else earlier on, this concerns that area of Donegal, Sean, that you know well. I would hate to have to abandon the school altogether, it has crossed my mind, but it would be irresponsible to do that. There are people, we fill all the B&Bs around the place, people depend hugely on that bit of extra money to send kids to school in the autumn and…”

O’Rourke: “I know but I mean, so you wanted to go ahead, but could you not, I mean women can drive to Donegal just as easily as men to participate in this. I’m just wondering if you should throw your net out again, maybe cast it a bit wider and, you know, that imbalance is actually worse than 25%. I mean maybe you could get it up to 35% or 45% by inviting a few more speakers or even going for a few all-female panels.”

Mulholland: “Well, look, Seán, if you’ve a few minutes on your hands maybe, you would come and advise and do a bit of work for me. But I don’t, let me not flippant. I mean there’s certainly no policy of not having women. Last year, I was just looking at last year’s programme. There was one panel on health. One of our key sessions – there was three women out of four, including, indeed Róisín [Shorthall] on it and Susan Mitchell [of the Sunday Business Post] and Rhona Mahony [ Master of the National Maternity Hospital] of Holles Street. So, you know, I mean nobody, nobody commented on that and that’s fine. But there is no certainly no thinking on my mind of: that women are not as good as men. In fact, I think they’re superior in very many ways…”

O’Rourke: “And in fairness to you, Joe, in your long career in RTÉ, you always made sure there was a gender balance in women who got promoted to positions, be they as presenters or correspondents…”

Mulholland: “I tried to…based on ability, Sean. Never as tokenism. And, you know, I didn’t believe in the policy of positive discrimination. Nor would very many women believe in it. But certainly promoting women, where at all possible, and I think there should be far more women in politics and there are not as many as we want and need and in our different institutions – some of which have failed miserably…”

O’Rourke: “I’ve taken my eye off the clock…”

Mulholland: “…disfunctionality…”

O’Rourke: “I really have to leave it. Look, Joe Mulholland, Dr Joe Mulholland, director of the MacGill Summer School and also my thanks to Catherine Murphy, TD for Kildare North, co-leader of the Social Democrats…”

Listen back in full here

Earlier: School’s Out

Social Democrat leaders Catherine Murphy (left) and Róisín Shortall on the ‘plinth’ this afternoon.

Leinster House, Dublin 2

Yesterday, Minister for Education Richard Bruton announced his plans to remove the baptism barrier in Irish schools.

But that’s not enough for the Soc Dems.

Not by a long ‘chalk’.

Co-leader Róisín Shortall said:

“We need to take religion out of the school day entirely. I will be tabling an amendment to the Education (School Admissions) Bill 2016 today to do just that.

Education Minister Richard Bruton’s proposals for divestment are piecemeal and seem like yet another long fingering exercise.

The Citizens’ Assembly model proved to be incredibly valuable in dealing with the issue of how to legislate for access to abortion in Ireland….

…The overwhelming public support for repealing the Eighth Amendment reflects a changed mood in the country.

People are moving towards a sense of civic ethics and increasingly they want to see the separation of the church and state in other aspects of public services, particularly our education system where 90 per cent of primary schools are under the patronage of the Church.

It would be very appropriate and timely for the government to task a Citizens’ Assembly to examine the issue and bring forward recommendations to the Oireachtas.”

GETOUTOFMYCLASSSYESYOUTOOMURPHY

*flings duster*

Social Democrats

Rollingnews