Tag Archives: TV3

Fergal O’Brien of TV3.

Reporting from flood relief works on the River Shannon at Banagher, Co Offaly, yesterday.

The glamour.

 

Matt Cooper (left) and Ivan Yates present the first Tonight Show last night on TV3 (including newsreader in ‘glass case of emotion’)

The Tonight Show with Ivan Yates and Matt Cooper premiered last night on TV3.

Did you stay up?

Did you miss Vinb?

Would you watch it again?

FIGHT!

Watch back in full here

Fight!

More as we get it.

Update:

*kicks telly*

Earlier today.

Outside the Fire Restaurant on Dawson Street, Dublin 2.

Comedian Al Porter was unveiled as the host of TV3’s new dating show, Blind Date, this autumn.

Those who wish to take part in the lorra lorra laughs show, can apply here

*Pop*

Leah Farrell/Rollingnews

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From top: Fine Gael TD Damien English, Rosie Leonard, of the Irish Housing Network, and Dr Rory Hearne, of TASC; a Dublin Region Homeless Executive graph showing the number of adults who have accessed homeless accommodation in Dublin since January 2014

Last night.

On TV3’s Tonight with Vincent Browne, presented by Michael Clifford.

Fine Gael TD and Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal Damien English, Rosie Leonard, of the Irish Housing Network, and Dr Rory Hearne, of TASC discussed the occupation of Apollo House by the group Home Sweet Home and the current homeless situation in Ireland.

They also discussed vulture funds with Ms Leonard recalling Focus Ireland’s ‘Vulture Shock’ campaign from earlier this year when it proposed legislation to protect homeowners and tenants from being evicted, via vulture funds.

At the time, Focus Ireland estimated that 47,000 homes in Ireland were owned by vulture funds.

Readers will recall how, in it’s most recent annual report published just before Christmas, the Simon Community said it had worked with 8,297 people – including 897 families – in 2015.

In addition to that, nearly 7,000 are currently using emergency accommodation.

Further to this…

From last night’s discussion…

Michael Clifford: “Damien, what do you think of Apollo House and Home Sweet Home?”

Damien English: “Well, look, as you said, there’s great energy there and it’s provided people with accommodation over the Christmas. You know, it is true to say that there is other, there is emergency accommodation there. We generally believe we have, there is enough of a supply there, we’ve increased it by 200. But this, it’s a worthy cause… again, it’s temporary and we are, as a government, as priority number one, to put in place long-term solutions. We can’t fix everything, every item, overnight but we’ve an action plan, you’ve read it yourself and we can talk through that but, you know, what Home Sweet Home are doing is certainly, you know, raised the profile a bit, there’s no doubt about that but for us, in Government, and for anybody involved in politics for the last year or two, it’s been a high priority, priority number one.”

Later

English: “…there is enough accommodation there and what’s happening at Apollo House it’s, again, it’s temporary…

Rosie Leonard: “Then why are people sleeping in doorways?”

English: “Well…I mean, there is enough accommodation. Not everyone wants to choose to use it, for different reasons. I accept all that. But I can say to you, there is enough accommodation there and already we’ve engaged, through the Peter McVerry Trust, with all the members in Apollo House, who are there. That 68 people have been taking up residence there, 42 have left…just to be clear Michael…42 have transitioned out of there now into accommodation.”

Clifford: “OK. Do you have any problem with people, like Home Sweet Home, highlighting this issue…occupying buildings as they…”

English: “I can’t condone the occupying buildings that are illegal, right? I’ve no problem with raising the profile of the issue and on the thousands of people who want to help, absolutely, that’s great. There’s a lot of NGOs, who are doing great work, working with government over the last number of years on this as well. I’m sure they’ll avail of the energy. I can’t say. To me, it’s unnecessary to occupy homes. I believe we’re providing enough emergency accommodation. But apart from that, people are also transitioning out of emergency accommodation. And just to be clear, Michael, people need to know, because Rosie’s right, there’s some hope here – 3,000 people left homelessness this year and went into permanent accommodation but the problem was 3,000 more came…”

Clifford: “Homelessness is higher this year than it has been ever…”

English: “But I’m saying to you, the problem is, many more come onto it. But we have said, and we’re committed to it that, by June next year, there’ll be nobody living in emergency accommodationwe will fix this.”

Later

English: “The trends that we can see are beginning to go the right way…”

Leonard: “They’re not.”

English: “Just…I want to make the point…”

Leonard:There’s an average of 60 families that are going to continue becoming homeless every month this year…

English: “From my point of view, from the department, from [Minister for Housing] Simon Coveney, myself and the department, we believe and we are confident, that we will have tackled that end of it by June.”

Later

Rory Hearne: “Nama has been used as a way to show the international markets that Ireland is recovering and the way in which the Government has approached that is, trying to sell off, Nama is selling as much assets as possible, showing we’re paying down the debt. Nama itself being wound up early, returning, making a return to the taxpayer. But the fact, the problem with that approach has been that, in fact, that has worsened the crisis. Because Nama, by Nama selling off the assets so quickly, and in particular I would focus on the Irish ones, the international are different, it has meant that, for example, Nama itself has said that it has sold land that could build 20,000 houses but only 5% of those houses have been built because it has sold them to vulture funds, to investors who are hoarding the land. Also…”

Clifford: “On that, a lot of developers claim that one of the big problems they have is that it’s not worth their while building because of the cost at the moment and that that is much of the reason for the fact that only 5% of those lands have been developed.”

Hearne: “And that is exactly the point that why Nama should have sold that land and the point is it can still…Nama still has the land, it said itself, it can build 20,000 houses in the coming five years which would make a dramatic impact in the crisis but the problem is that those 20,000 houses, only 10% will be social, if even. And the rest will be sold to vulture fund investors because Nama’s mandate – that it’s operating under, under direction from the Minister for Finance – is to maximise the financial return to the taxpayer. The problem with that is it’s just selling assets that could be used for affordable housing and the issue is that Nama now has €3billion in cash reserves; it has paid down the majority of its debt. Those houses could be built as affordable houses if it sold them to local authorities, to housing associations and I think what has happened is the Government have looked on the housing system and the housing market and seen recovery in property prices as part of feeding into the narrative of economic recovery, rather than actually looking at how are we providing affordable housing and I think Nama is one key way that things could be done differently and can still be done differently.”

“The other issue is that they’ve promoted the introduction, the influx of real estate investment trusts. The Government introduced a tax break in 2013 which allowed real estate investment trusts write off a certain amount of their profits for rent because the Government has been about bringing in these investors to buy up the property, to give the impression that Ireland’s property bubble, crash has been dealt with…”

Later

Hearne: “Kennedy Wilson [US investment fund] it’s been shown by the Freedom of Information Act, wrote to the government in 2014 and 2015, when there were talks of introducing rent controls…they were against the introduction of rent controls and the 4% increase in rent that’s been put in the rental strategy, there’s no evidence behind that. Why 4%? Why was it not inflation [Consumer Price Index]? And 4% is a yield to attract in private investors…at the heart of the problem is that the Government has not gone about approaching the housing issue with providing housing as a human right and a home. If you look at the action plan, the right to a home is not mentioned once in that plan.”

Clifford: “Rosie?”

Leonard: “There’s no…another thing to add to that, there’s no preventative measures to stop the homeless figures from increasing. For example, there was an amendment proposed by Focus Ireland, into the new rental strategy bill. Focus Ireland have said that a third of all families being made homeless and presenting to them are because they’re in buy-to-let houses, the owners are selling up and they’re being forced out, evicted, because of terms of sale. And there was an amendment put in by Focus Ireland – to stop the terms of sale being used as the cause for an eviction in a buy-to-let house and that was voted down by Fine Gael. That would have immediately stopped a third of families who are becoming homeless and the 60, a month, on average, who are becoming homeless next year and that’s not even including people who are sofa surfing, who are hidden homeless, who are living in overcrowded situations and you declined that. So you’ve actually, you’ve actually said no to preventative measures that would have eased off the number of…”

Clifford [to English]: “Deal in general with the idea that Nama is not being used predominantly for the social good, as it could be, and it would tackle this issue, rather than as a vehicle to generate money to show the international community that the economy is doing well. Just deal with that issue.”

English: “I’ve heard that commentary and I’ve read a lot of what Rory has written on this aswell and it actually isn’t true…”

Watch back in full here

Previously: Apollo, Nama And You

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Staying in tonight?

TV3’s Tonight with Vincent Browne will broadcast an interview Mr Browne has carried out with Jonathan Sugarman at 11pm.

Mr Sugarman is a former executive at Unicredit Bank Ireland in Dublin’s IFSC who resigned in September 2007 after giving a detailed account of enormous liquidity breaches at his bank a year before the financial crash.

Previously: Who Is Jonathan Sugarman?

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During the newspaper review on TV3’s Tonight with Vincent Browne, hosted by Alison O’Connor, the panelists were Louise Bayliss, from SPARK, and Eoghan Corry, from Travel Extra.

They discussed the coverage of the Olympic Council of Ireland president Pat Hickey’s arrest in Rio yesterday.

Alison O’Connor: “So, Eoghan, wall-to-wall coverage…”

Eoghan Corry: “It’s one story and it’s a media-led story. Let’s look at this,you know, bring a bit of analysis to this. It’s been a media-led story from the beginning…and the Brazilian newspaper…”

O’Connor: “My god, I mean, the media doesn’t have to do too much work here, the facts are tumbling out…It’s just…”

Corry: “The Brazilian newspapers are the ones that led the charge on this investigation and they were the ones invited by the police today and the video that’s being shown all over the place, and the picture, the naked photograph, we have it on the front of the Examiner – the bathrobes photograph, he was naked when he opened the door on Pat Hickey is…”

O’Connor: “It’s rather distasteful, isn’t it?”

Corry: “Well, is this part of the process? You know, is this part of a judicial process? Is taking, going through somebody’s laptop to get their confidential…”

O’Connor: “Perp-walk approach…”

Corry: “…legal advice. That’s the sort of thing that was said about [Minister for Sport] Shane Ross “put him in his box” is said in the Four Courts everyday, in the private meetings with people, with their clients, that was paraded by the police today. The police were the ones who suggested that he was not cooperating with them when they arrived and was in a separate room. The Olympic Council statement later on says, this is not the case. Those of us, in a late night programme, analysing the media coverage, have to make the point, this is not process, this is media-led. There is almost a voyeuristic thing here of taking on Pat Hickey, with the cameras and parading it around the world before anything comes to trial.

“We also have another very interesting angle, in that Shane Ross has been telling the Examiner, a great story by Daniel McConnell, the political editor of the Examiner…”

O’Connor: “Who broke the original drug test story…”

Corry: “Absolutely, terrific work again by the Examiner, and he said that he was considering withdrawing the funding for the OCI. You can see here what we have…”

O’Connor: “And you can see why. I mean, obviously, then you have the athletes suffering…”

Corry: “OK, well if you consider from a sporting background and most, a lot of my journalistic life, my early journalistic life was in sport. We saw, every time, politicians went trailblazing through sport, it was for their own benefit. We saw a Taoiseach end up on the podium for the Tour de France, we saw, you know…”

O’Connor: “But would you not acknowledge that there are obviously questions that need to be answered here?”

Corry: “Of course there are questions but is a politician saying, ‘I’m going to sort all of this out, trailing down and coming back out. You know. Pat Hickey has been through Minister for Sport after Minister for Sport and if we just look back at the trail of habits of some of our previous ministers…”

O’Connor: “The man certainly has longevity.”

Watch back in full here

Earlier: Calling It

Previously: Chutzpals

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‘sup?

TV3 presenters, from left Ray Foley, Elaine Crowley , Alan Hughes and Cassie Stokes support the launch Children’s Hospice Week [23rd -29th May 2016 ] taking place on in aid of LauraLynn.

There are approximately 4000 children living with a life-limiting condition in Ireland and each year about 350 of these children die. Children’s Hospice Week focuses on the seriously ill children and their families, cared for by the LauraLynn team.

LauraLynn

Leon Farrell/Rollingnews

Meanwhile…

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Irish Rugby International and Leinster player Isaac Boss (centre) with GAA players, from left:  Paul Ryan,Johnny McCaffrey, Shane Barrett and Niall Corcoran supporting Children’s Hospice Week.

Leon Farrell/Rollingnews

 

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Raidió Teilifís Éireann has agreed a ‘sub-licence agreement’ with loathed rivals TV3 for broadcasting of this Summer’s football European Championship.

RTÉ will keep the good stuff (all of Ireland’s games) naturally.

Group head of RTÉ Sport Ryle Nuggent said:

RTÉ is delighted to partner with TV3, another Irish broadcaster, to ensure that the UEFA Euro 2016 Finals are delivered to Irish audiences free-to-air…

Broke so.

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“This is extremely disappointing news for RTÉ. We have a long and proud tradition of showcasing the 6 Nations and putting our heart and soul into our coverage.

We want to assure the Irish public that every possible effort was made by RTÉ to retain these rights. As a public service broadcaster, RTÉ’s ambition has always been, and continues to be, to deliver the best possible viewer experience and to share moments of major national importance.

We put forward the best possible bid within our means, while always mindful of the significant responsibilities attached to spending public funds.”

Ryle Nugent, Group Head of Sport, RTÉ

*kicks telly*

TV3 wins Six Nations Championship rights from 2018 (TV3)