Tag Archives: Wales

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For the day that’s in it.

Saturday, 20th February, 1999.

The cusp of the BOD era.

Ireland travelled to England to face a then homeless Wales side. Big heavy handbags ensued.

Keith Duggan writing in the Irish Times said:

AH, the incomparable beauty of a Keith Wood smile. We have seen him in all his guises over the past two weeks, from the bleak figure in the blue mezzotint standing ruined in Lansdowne Road to his grinning, pale, headed colossus, gamley stoking the masses at the end of a sporting hour, which will be undoubtedly be rememberd as Wembley’s finest by everyone except, possibly, Geoff Hurst.

Mmf!

Six Nations International: Wales v Ireland (BBC Sport)


What?

Wait.

It wasn’t supposed to be like this.

Wales have beaten a much overrated and underperforming (again) Belgian side tonight in Lille.

Hal Robson-Kanu (top) performed the most successful ‘Cruyff Turn‘ since 1974 to put Wales ahead and steer them on the road to the semi-final.

Final score: Wales 3 Belgium 1

UEFA Euro 2016 



For the weekend that will be in it.

A look back at Saturday, April 4, 1987.

At the Cardiff Arms Park, Ireland put in an oddly schizophrenic performance but prevailed over Wales.

Edmund Van Esbeck writing (through rose tinted spectacles) in the Irish Times said:

A season that started with such bright promise and hope, but faltered in the midway period has ended in a triumph and triumph this was. Never has the appellation “the fighting Irish” been more appropriately applied to an Ireland rugby team..

..the heart of Irish rugby still beats with strong rhythm. It was a great day for the fighting Irish last Saturday.

Mmf!

Previously: How Green Was Their Valley?

Retro Rugby on Broadsheet.ie

 

irfu

McGurk! You’re cut.

Ryan!! You’re in.

A passive aggressive defence of Joe Schmidt’s “kicking game” is the theme for RTÉ’s Jonathan Ryan-narrated promo ahead of Ireland versus Wales in Cardiff Arms Park Nua, Wales, today.

It gets results in fairness.

Previously: How Green Was Their Valley

RTÉ Rugby: Six Nations

Thanks Richie McCormack

Update:

Wales win 23-16.

The breakdown; Ireland need to beat Scotland next week and hope other results go our way.

Easy, easy.

wales-ireland-1989 prog ticket stub

For the week that’s in it.

Saturday, February 4th, 1989.

It was the year the Hurricane blew away a young Stephen Hendry to win the Irish Masters Snooker Championship and Samuel Beckett passed away.

It was also the year a resurgent Ireland team traveled to the Cardiff Arms Park determined to banish the waning Welsh to a third successive defeat.

Noel Mannion’s block, clutch and gut-bursting carry paved the way.

Eileen Battersby wrote in the following Monday’s Irish Times:

Noel Mannion, grabbed the ball inside his own half and with the grace of a stampeding dray horse, showed the Welsh backs – and the rest of Wales – exactly how serious their rugby problems are when he scored 70 yards later.

“What have things come to when they can’t catch a number eight?”, asked the shaken Welshman in the sheepskin coat.

Blue-dee Buh-real-ee-unt.

Previously: Bread Of Heaven

wales

Rob Williams writes:

“So I moved to the land of opportunity (Old) South Wales [UK]a couple of years ago and although I miss the faces on poles I thought elections over.here felt a little more civilised as a result.
That was until I saw this on the ballot paper. An ultra right party (splitters from the BNP) are using [murdered soldier] Lee Rigby’s name to garner votes. Thought I’d got away from that sort of politicisation of murder when I left Belfast…”

programme 2ticket

 

 

For the weekend that’s nearly in it.

Saturday, March 16th, 1985.

An extremley fast, fresh faced Irish rugby side – containing Mick “Kick” Kiernan, Brendan Mullen, Trevor Ringland and Keith Crossan – travelled to Cardiff Arms Park with murmurings of another ‘Tripler’ on the cards. Wales, outpaced, outthought and outskilled rolled over.

Edmund Van Esbeck of the Irish Times said:

Prior to the match on Saturday, there was a very significant gesture by the Ireland side – As they stood for the Welsh anthem, all the players linked arms as a mark of their solidarity. Never was that characteristic better exemplified than this truly remarkable match.

That night, on the jukebox? Yep!

Bonus Thornley wears an ear stud footage

Images: Ebay

Previously: Campbell’s Coup, 1982