Institutionalised

at

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Children protesting at the Kinsale Road Direct Provision Centre in Cork in 2014

Further to the announcement that the weekly allowance to asylum seeker children is to be increased from €9.60 to €16.60…

The Irish Refugee Council writes:

[Junior Justice Minister Aodhán] Ó Ríordáin said yesterday the welfare of children was of paramount importance, and the obvious priority was on their wellbeing.

“Living a life in direct provision is no life for a child. Given our own history of child incarceration and institutions, this was an obvious focus,” he said.

So they double the allowance for children for the first time in 15 years and they continue to live their lives in institutions?

Asylum seeker child allowance to rise from €9.60 to €16.60 a week (Irish Times)

Previously: The Institutionalisation Of 1,818 Children In Ireland

Irish Refugee Council

31 thoughts on “Institutionalised

  1. fluffybiscuits

    Nothing ever changes or if it does tis at a snails pace. The children are relying on the generosity of others whilst the ministers lorde it up on their fat gold plated pensions

  2. Jake38

    How can anyone continue to doubt the utter incompetence of the Irish legal system, when it takes 9 years to decide if someone is a bona fide asylum seeker or a chancer?

    1. mauriac

      most are decided but the appeals are endless and Irish pols are squeamish about deporting people en masse unlike say Germany.

    2. DubLoony

      Should be a priority to have a decision made if there are kids involved.
      And if the decision is no, then it needs to be acted on as well.

  3. Anne

    Sorry to be a pedant, but it’s not been doubled. €19.20 would be double.

    “Further to the announcement that the weekly allowance to asylum seeker children is to be increased from €9.60 to €16.60…”

    “So they double the allowance for children for the first time in 15 years and they continue to live their lives in institutions?”

      1. Anne

        Hehe.. very good.

        To be precise, it’s been increased by 72.916 %.
        Not 100% – (that’d be double)

        72% increase of a pittance is still a pittance though.

  4. cian

    Can anyone point me towards stats on Asylum seekers? Namely how long (average) the initial decision takes. And then the numbers that are appealed, and number of appeals?

    So if someone is “in Limbo” for 9 years – has their case been looked at – and if so, how many appeals have there been.

    1. pedeyw

      Well the opinions of someone who refers to themselves in the third person can always be trusted.

  5. ollie

    From 2014:
    NIGERIAN migrants here are now sending nearly half-a-billion euro back home each year. World Bank figures reveal that €468m in ‘remittances’ was sent from Ireland to Nigeria in 2011. That’s an average of more than €26,000 for each of the 17,642 Nigerian nationals in Ireland, including children.

    They must be good at saving their €9.60 a week! How can a state ignore this out flux of money?

    1. Funster Fionnanánn

      You Sir or Madam are a racist. And your ignorance makes me sad. Please stop talking to people in the bar, they only nod along because you frighten them.

      1. Disasta

        I don’t condone what he said but the largest % of attacks/attempted scams on my PayPal come from that country. Plus when I’ve sold anything of value on DoneDeal the address of the would be buyer trying to scam me has been from that country.

        But seriously, they can’t be sending half a billion home from here per year, can they? Seems odd.

        1. pissedasanewt

          Of course, that’s assuming that all Nigerians in Ireland are seeking asylum. You could have some highly paid, doctors, lawyers etc working legitimately in Ireland and sending the money home.

          I did stumble across another story from Malta where 44 migrants were repatriated a year after arriving seeking asylum. Would seem to be a better system all around if you could do the repatriation within one year.

  6. Neilo

    In fairness, I’m responsible for half of that outflow. That kidnapped prince is a slippery beggar!

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