Movember Trigger Warning

at

21

Oh.

Why can’t a man  grow a fun moustache for the benefit of his fellow man?

John Gallen bristles:

I thought this was a bit rich coming from Feminists of Dublin on the first day of Movember, and one day after Breast Cancer Awareness month. How many gimmicks have been seen from Feminism in raising awareness over the years…. more than you can shake a stick at?

There are so many gimmicks around breast cancer awareness they have to write about how to avoid them and donate effectively.

Yet, when a men’s movement on raising awareness of cancers that kill more men than breast cancer kills women… it’s gimmicky… why so damned hypocritical, why not practice what they preach?

The anecdotes in those tweets, and the “I feel” or “seem” perspective rather than facts is beyond any self awareness …the hypocrisy, the disdain, the pettiness is laughable.

The attempt at distinguishing men’s mental health issues from women’s and how the tweeter employs competitive victimhood (it’s a modern-feminism thing) in how the awareness of these is raised is just shocking…

FIGHT!

Movember

UPDATE:

Feminists of Dublin writes:

I’d like to reply, – pass this on to John Gallan if you wish, he doesn’t seem to want to talk to me over twitter.

Actually I’d like you to take it down as I now will probably have to deal with a bunch of abusive tweets but I’m betting you won’t.

So lets look at the lovely message john wrote:

” I thought this was a bit rich coming from Feminists of Dublin on the first day of Movember, and one day after Breast Cancer Awareness month. How many gimmicks have been seen from Feminism in raising awareness over the years…. more than you can shake a stick at? There are so many gimmicks around breast cancer awareness they have to write about how to avoid them and donate effectively.”

‘m actually not a fan of breast cancer awareness month, I think it a silly gimmick where far too little money goes to actual breast cancer research and people don’t talk enough about how to self exam. Pink T shirts don’t save lives. medical advances do. I actually have have a lot of family history of breast cancer. Its very likely in my future.

“Yet, when a men’s movement on raising awareness of cancers that kill more men than breast cancer kills women… it’s gimmicky… why so damned hypocritical, why not practice what they preach?”

well firstly I never advocated for breast cancer awareness month, I haven’t tweeted about it whatsoever. I kind of ignore it. So I don’t see how I, as an individual am a hypocrite for some someone else does?

“The anecdotes in those tweets, and the “I feel” or “seem” perspective rather than facts is beyond any self awareness …the hypocrisy, the disdain, the pettiness is laughable.”

I chose to tweet some of my personal thoughts, and made an effort to clarify I was not saying this was some kind of feminist gospel . The disdain is completely imaged by John it seems. My entire point was that Movember doesn’t raise as much money as it could.

The attempt at distinguishing men’s mental health issues from women’s and how the tweeter employs competitive victimhood (it’s a modern-feminism thing) in how the awareness of these is raised is just shocking…

Its odd how when I pointed out how a campaign for men’s mental health separates itself from women’s mental health issues I am accused of being guilty of doing just that?

Its a perfectly valid observation, the movemeber website even talks about how it its literally on the website that they believe they need to distinguish men’s health issues from women’s (in mental health, I get that prostates are a whole other story)

I’m ultimately disappointment that my unassuming tweets are being reposted on the site frames as some kind of anti-men attack.

I kind of expected better.

104 thoughts on “Movember Trigger Warning

  1. Tony

    That will do wonder for gender issues. Imagine if a man had written the same thing about Breast Cancer Awareness issues. Well done FOD.

    1. C - the supposed man hater

      Hi, tweeter in question here.
      I wrote the same thing about breast cancer actually,
      wearing pink is gimmicky and takes away form the issue too. not a fan of breast cancer month.

  2. bisted

    …competitive victimhood…thank you John Gallen…I’ve stolen that and shall use it as my own..

      1. bisted

        …thanks…but I’ve had compassion fatique longer than charity CEOs have had 6-figure salaries…

    1. Heather

      Pretty sure there was nothing competitive about what FOD said. She just pointed out that Movember has stopped being a very productive campaign for health, and become a gimmick. Couldn’t that be reasonably interpreted as wanting more compassion for serious issues like mental health and prostate cancer…. not dismissing them? She certainly didn’t say they’re less important than women’s health problems.

      1. Clampers Outside

        True, what she does argue is that the mental health concerns of men and women are viewed differently (which they should be) but she “feels” that this is wrong and makes a false claim that mental health disorders in men are given an easier time….. which is a nonsense.

        “Campaigns that look to tackle men’s depression and suicide try validate men’s problems by emphasising how different they are to women’s “… then read the following tweets after that. it gets competitive on the victimhood front, as she’s just whining that men might have a different problem requiring different treatment, but is bitterly focused on her anecdotal claim that men have it easier which is a complete made up misandric spiteful nonsense.

        Worth noting, her posts about criticising Breast Cancer Awareness month when she claims to have said the same things about it’s gimmicks, as in the Movember campaign… were posted AFTER this reached BS.

        Make of that as you will….

  3. Jimmee

    More of this unhelpful commentary from feminists will lead to people ignoring what they have to say.

    1. C - the supposed man hater

      Hi, I’m the tweeter in question.
      You disagree that movember could do more to talk about the actual issues at the center, and young men could do more to tackle issues than just grow beards?

      to each their own, was just my opinion before it ended up here.

    1. C - the supposed man hater

      Hi, tweeter in question, I’m wondering where exactly you believe I am showing an anti-male view?

      I didn’t mean to upset anyone, but I thought my tweets were perfectly reasonable to say the campaign focuses more on beards than issues like prostate cancer?

  4. Nigel

    ‘The attempt at distinguishing men’s mental health issues from women’s and how the tweeter employs competitive victimhood (it’s a modern-feminism thing) in how the awareness of these is raised is just shocking…’

    This is what he gets out of a wish for awareness campaigns based less on gimmicks and more on actual healthcare? Talk about going a few extra miles past the point to find something to get offended by. I don’t necessarily agree with her – gimmicky campaigns have their place as well as their drawbacks, and can capture the imagination and raise awareness effectively, but certainly there’s a need for greater focus on the actual healthcare side of things.

    Although I do like how he blames the tweeter and feminism for the idea that women’s health care needs are treated differently from men;s, as if simply noting it is a greater fault than the thing itself.

    1. Tony

      It is a negative, misandrist, divisive, self-aggrandising, warped view of Movember. No empathy for men at all. Exploiting mens mental health issues to drive a feminist agenda. Thanks sister.

      1. C - the supposed man hater

        So its the problem that I said I don’t like gimmicks, or that I mentioned movember, as an example.

        You probably wouldn’t like my earlier thoughts on the ‘please talk’ campaign. Another example of de medicalising mental health

        “Gimmicks” are a problem when they deflect attention away from the real issues.

        1. Vote Rep #1

          The reason that groups use gimmicky things is because it is a fun way of raising money and getting people on board while also getting your message out. If it was a 100% serious message, it would not be as popular as it is. Instead, they did Movember and raised nearly €1m quid last year. I’d imagine that the breast cancer one raised tenfold of that. Boooo!

    2. C - the supposed man hater

      Hi. I’m tweeter in question.

      Thanks for being the first person to seemingly actually read what I read?

      for the record I think breast cancer awareness is actually just as bad, buying pink things doesn’t always fund research.

  5. jackson

    Well feminism as a belief is about segregating women and men and censorship of anything not deemed feminist. I mean she announces that this event should be removed because it doesn’t fit in with her beliefs

    1. ahjayzis

      “Well feminism as a belief is about segregating women and men and censorship of anything not deemed feminist.”

      And socialism is about forming a vast superstate across Asia and Eastern Europe based on subjugation and poltiical repression ONLY.

          1. jackson

            Yes the feminists do, hence they want to promote discriminatory legislation and public services, segregated transport, women only management, gender quotas

          2. Neilo

            Then it’s a power struggle that men will lose every single time, if my own home life is any indication. :-)

          3. ahjayzis

            SOME jackson, some feminists are like this.

            I’m a feminist bloke who quite likes other blokes – I just think women are equals. That’s the base definition of a feminist. Don’t slur everyone else because of children like FoD who thinks its a schoolyard “girls are better than boy-oys” chant.

      1. C - the supposed man hater

        I was advocating bringing together mental health campaigns?

        So i guess this is unrelated to what I said…

    2. C - the supposed man hater

      Hi there, twitter account owner here,

      Actually I didn’t, if you read my tweets I initially just complained that it actually just doesn’t say ‘prostate cancer” enough.

      No banning at all. cheers

  6. Tony

    This proves that teh feminism is evil and wrong and all teh feminists is man hatin’ witches why did she leave me why

        1. Clampers Outside!

          Nah….. I feel more schadenfreude for those who display such ignorance, hypocrisy and complete lack of self awareness when they tweet as FOD have…. they should be laughed at and ridiculed IMO :)

  7. Jess

    As a feminist from dublin, can I just say Im not represented by Feminists of Dublin, nor have I ever heard of them or agree with what they’re talking about here.

    1. C - the supposed man hater

      hi Jess, I wroite the tweets

      Its a coffee meetup.

      I don’t want to ban movember, I was just talking about it being gimmicky by not talking about prostate cancer. and then I made some other observation about how we talk about mens mental health an an entirely separate issue.

      but I guess if that’s the stance you hate, up to you..*shrug*

      1. Jess

        Thanks for coming on here and clarifying, and conducting yourself in a mature manner.

        I admit that its very difficult to to garner context from what was initially posted and what you have said in follow up all seems very reasonable. So my apologies for taking that the wrong way.

      2. John Gallen

        Men and women’s mental health ARE different. You being a feminist wouldn’t want to see that because feminism, being a pseudo science, chooses to ignore biology and insists that biological determinism is irrelevant and puts all the focus on environment or as it likes to call, social construction. It’s a half baked social theory with little to no scientific basis and cannot withstand any detailed scrutiny, and one that it would appear, only feminist ideologues subscribe to. Mental health is both environment, and biological and has gender differences in prevalence and severity of different issues.

        American Psychological Association:
        http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2011/08/mental-illness.aspx

        And a more simpler explanation here – http://www.livescience.com/56599-depression-differs-men-women-symptoms.html
        “We have known about sex differences for years when it comes to depression, and they are absolutely essential to understanding the illness,” said Jill Goldstein, director of research at the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

  8. H

    As a woman (I know my avatar has led some of you think otherwise) I had to chuckle at my misreading of ‘…. more than you can shake a stick at?’ as… well you guessed it, I saw a d instead of the st – hehehe, yes I’m a child…

  9. Harry Molloy

    I think all of the women I know, who would all consider themselves feminists, would distance themselves from that drivel. And indeed most items with a feminist hashtag on twitter

  10. jeremy kyle

    I’m all for banning Movember if it means no more selfie campaigns.

    But, at the end of the day if it’s raising money for a worthy cause it’s all good.

  11. C - the supposed man hater

    Hey, so this is my twitter, thanks for the attention.

    What he so kindly leaves out is that I am a suffer of mental heath problems, as are many male family members of mine. I also lost a male friend to suicide.

    So while its so thrilling to get all this attention (/s) its again disappointed that my point was missed,
    Movember is gimmicky. Why? because your not talking about prostate health, of depression, its all about mustaches. By all means check my timeline and you can see where I said this How I see so many guys growing beards, posting pictures of Facebooks without donating a cent, or ever saying the words prostate cancer

    Breast cancer awareness is equally gimmicky, we all know what wearing pink and ‘save the boobies doesn’t compare to money being donated to caner research or actual talk about how vital it is to regularly check for changes.

    Sadly its entirely expected that another internet outrage-vulture cares more about selectively choosing tweets to stir up internet drama than actually talking about the ways men and women experience depression, or whether we are actually increasing awareness of prostate cancer. Or if the various ‘please talk’ campaigns are patronizing to those in a real mental health crisis.

    Because apparently I am the real enemy for saying that the campaign is too possibly removed form the issues that matter?

    1. Tony

      No. you’re the real enemy cos you’re just a feminist pain in the hoop appropriating mens issues to make some random gender based point. Your lack of empathy for men unfortunately feeds the stereotype of annoying, whiny feminist.

      1. C - the supposed man hater

        I didn’t use a hashtag, or ask to be in any way associated myself of ‘appropriating’ with Movember.
        So what exactly am I doing wrong, aside from i guess, existing?

    2. Yeah, Ok

      You have an entire twitter page of “internet outrage” and you’re trying to tell people to cut it out here?
      Your bitterness at the world is plainly obvious and you feel the need to cut down other peoples’ efforts at innocently doing something good so you can feel better wallowing in your self-created misery. What harm if it’s fun and gimmicky, awareness of men’s cancer and mental health is woefully lacking in the world. Just because it might mean that women’s issues are not front and centre for a tiny amount of time you have to attack it?
      Your toxic attitude is exactly the type of behaviour that has tarnished the word feminism beyond repair. I consider myself a feminist in the true sense of the word but would never call myself one because of poisonous little trolls like you who are crawling all over the internet.

      1. C - the supposed man hater

        I want mens issues to be front and center, I’m not sure where your getting this idea.
        I just talked about how it doesn’t talk directly about prostate cancer, and the depression talk overly focuses on differences in mental health, and rejects similarities felt by all suffers?

        I don’t see how im attacking anything if it was on my own twitter, using no hastags, not @ mentioning anyone untull some stranger selected a bunch and arranged then for broadsheet?
        if you want to grow a beard, good for you, just please remember to donate to the cause too.

        1. John Gallen

          “some stranger selected a bunch and arranged then for broadsheet”

          Jaysus… the blatant lies outta you… the tweets are shown in order, none missed, exactly in the order as you tweeted them.
          They are the “ACTUAL” tweets, I looked myself.

          I’d love for you to elaborate on the accusation that someone ‘selected’ tweets. The implication being that they were done so maliciously to portray you badly. Please do show how this is the case as you have made the accusation….

        2. John Gallen

          ” I don’t see how im attacking anything if it was on my own twitter, using no hastags, not @ mentioning anyone ”

          Do you know what a social media platform is? Do you know what it is that you are engaging with, an open and public platform for sharing information, hashtags and @mentions are for increasing targeted messages and communicating more directly. They do not make your tweets any different then that.

          It’s a public posting platform. If you were serious about not wanting to attract other persons interested in the topic you are tweeting about, there is a function to make your account private, by not engaging that you are speaking to the wider public.
          When you put tweets out, you invite the conversation, that is the function of social media, so please stop making it out that someone picked up on a conversation about something not intended for them – you tweeted publicly, not privately.

          1. C - the supposed man hater

            Hi John, finally got your attention.
            Thanks for replying.

            I had a few points to make, One being that breast cancer awareness month is hugely gimmicky and so little of the money makes it to breast cancer research, so we are actually in agreement there.

            I just don’t get what you have a problem with, or what part exactly gave you the idea that I am a misandrist?

            I think movember is focused on beards and few of the dudes I know donated any money at all. I see posters for events but I genuinly have to search to figure out what issues of chrities will be recieving.

          2. C - the supposed man hater

            Hi John, finally got your attention.
            Thanks for replying. =)

            I had a few points to make, One being that breast cancer awareness month is hugely gimmicky and so little of the money makes it to breast cancer research, so we are actually in agreement there.

            I just don’t get what you have a problem with, or what part exactly gave you the idea that I am a misandrist?

            I think Movember is focused on beards and few of the dudes I know donated any money at all. I see posters for events but I genuinely have to search to figure out what issues of charities will be receiving. I have concerns that a campaign to raise awareness of prostate cancer is not saying “prostate cancer” enough to really raise awareness.

            I in no way advocate banning it, in fact you can see my other tweets where I say “If it helps men, I’m all for it”. Which you chose to omit.

            I just worry that you seemed to have a problem with me and I want to make amends =).
            Since we both just want better for men.

            I don’t see whats controversial about wanting a focus on “real healthcare”.

            I guess you might have thought my opinions on seeking treatment for mental health issues controversial. I admit I am biased, as all humans are. I can only speak directly for my own experiences. Which is why I chose to use terms like “I feel” instead of speaking in absolutes.

            I have seen men in my life struggle, and lose the battle with mental health difficulties. It was my personal observation that I, and other women I know had more of a job receiving treatment options like antidepressants. Many others have shared similar stories with me, often having serious depressive symptoms attributed to hormones. An issue men will not face.

            Too many men die young,
            The message behind Movember, is whats important here.

            Im sorry my , as you pointed out, public internet musings upset you so much.

            but I would like to point out, we don’t actually disagree, on anything you said.

            Your rant against me was a rant against incorrect assumptions. Not against me, I actually agree with you. You spoke like I LOVE break cancer awareness month but Hate Movember. Which is not true.
            I actually think Movember is more important right now. I guess I just don’t like beard selfies that much?

            By all means, grow your beard though, I promise I’m not going to screen cap you and then rant about what an idiot I think you are – like you did to me.

            Cheers x

            I’m sure if we had a real talk we would probably find we

    3. jeremy kyle

      I share the same reservations about other social media based campaigns, I remember there was a backlash over (I think it was the no make-up selfie thing) and eventually instead of posting selfies people started posting proof that they donated and it ended up raising a lot of money for the respective cause.

      Now, would that have happened without the gimmicky campaign in the first place? I don’t think so.

      Ultimately I think it does more good than harm and whilst I agree it’s important to keep reemphasising what the point of it actually is, I think you’re getting in to dangerous territory when you start questioning the motives of the people involved.

      I just think it’s better to focus on the positives in these cases and take the negatives with a pinch of salt. Not everything needs to be a battle.

    4. Kevin

      All of what I am supposed to say is opinion and based on anecdotal evidence.

      The gimmicks are probably what makes the campaign work. It is what makes is shareable and inclusive and so on. Yes, there are people who are jumping the bandwagon of the gimmick without engaging with the cause behind it. But there are also people who do both, using the gimmick to speak about the cause.

      I understand where you are coming from, about how the gimmick can overshadow the cause behind it but I have seen people use Movember to raise huge amounts of money, to speak about their personal experience in a way that they have not been able to before. Putting the cause front and centre can be too much to handle for some people. they need things like Movember as a vehicle to speak about it or confront it, whatever

      There is also a community spirit that can grow out of these things, that can lead to more fundraising outside of the ‘awareness’ months. or a way for people to seek support. Yes, Movember can be annoying (usually it’s the planks who don’t open the wallet) but I think it has caught on for a reason and does a lot more good than harm. again, just my opinion

    5. Sara P.

      Hi C,

      Thank you for drawing attention to the fact that you have mental health issues. However this charity is not about you. Or struggles you may face. I’m sure men appreciate your interest in these issues, but I feel like much of your argument is in the same vain as mansplaining – it seems like you are doing the exact same thing. Let them decide how they want to discuss these issues.

      Look at twitter hastags for Movember – most of them have the current slogan “Stop men dying too young”. Saying something like “stop men dying from prostate cancer and also create a support network for suicide among men for one month” is a bit of a mouthful. The actual Movember website clearly explains multiple times on the front page what it is all about, as well as providing links to information. If someone didn’t know, they’d google it and instantly understand. Perhaps many men are not comfortable yet outright calling it prostate and mental health awareness month, so this can act as a sort of buffer in general conversation. I don’t know for certain, but I don’t think anyone is in doubt what this charity idea is about.

      Your point about social media – I see multiple videos trending of celebrities talking about both issues, early screening and mental health. And lots of businesses joining in to promote the event and mentioning what it’s about as well. You may argue that people are not fully discussing these things on twitter – how can they? It’s 140 word limit, as you yourself mention in many of your tweets, highlighting that twitter as a platform loses impact and the message is diluted or lost often due to limitations with the site. I don’t know about you but i’d rather people discuss these issues in a comfortable environment among peers, friends and family face to face. Blurting something personal online isn’t always the best platform.

      Like you, I cannot get prostate cancer, or grow a beard, or comment about men’s mental health from a position of full understanding as I am not a man. This is the same way a man cannot understand many of the problems I face and comment about those unique issues. Isn’t this what many of my feminist sisters talk about? Sure you say you did research about male suicide, but that’s like a man “mansplaining” hormonal issues to me after reading some research papers. This goes both ways. Perhaps many men are still not able to outright give a name to Movember for what it is, calling it protate cancer month, or men’s mental health awareness month. Who knows, I don’t! However I’m going to support them however they wish to discuss these issues, when they are ready.

      It is in every human’s interest to all humans in all their struggles, however we can.

      1. Sara P.

        *It is in every human’s interest to help all humans in all their struggles, however we can.
        (typing huge swaths of text on my phone is difficult >.< )

      2. C - the supposed man hater

        I know its not about me.
        My awareness of mental health issues started when I lost my friend to suicide – he was 19..
        Its pretty personal to me.

        I made a tweet about movember and the beards, and not saying prostate cancer.
        Seems harmless.

        I went on to tweet a bit more about how we talk about men’s mental health.
        Not entirely related to Movember.
        More so off the back of just finishing mental health awareness month.
        I wasn’t trying to lecture anyone. I wasn’t tweeting at movember of using a hashtag. I was just sort of humming and hawing over “does this say something about the capacity society thinks men have to tackle these issues”.

        1. Yeah, Ok

          As feminists (the SJW strand, at least) are wont to say when trying to shut down anyone who deviates from the groupthink, maybe you should remember to “stay in lane” before you run your mouth off next time?

        2. Sara P.

          Ok I see where you are coming from.

          Great you didn’t use any hashtag or @. It is not a problem to have your own thoughts and express them. The problem arises when you do so from a position of authority. If it was from a personal account with your name or any other handle, there would not be this issue. You were logged in as Feminists of Dublin – speaking for others, yet sharing your personal beliefs. I know, it’s a small meeting group for discussions and a book club, but the name stands for something bigger. That is really not fair, which I think many people here are trying to articulate but get bogged down in other details. Just something to ponder.

    1. John Gallen

      Isn’t the ACTUAL screengrab in the original BS post the exact same list of your tweets, is there a point to your attention seeking?

      Why didn’t you put your tweets in context by using the same tone in rubbishing the Breast Cancer Awareness month, why did you wait until it was over, and only raise your concerns about gimmicks when the men’s campaign started?
      An answer to this would give you some credibility, but from where you are standing right now, you’re throwing stones from within a glass house.
      Further proof of your gimmick hypocrisy is in your tweet about working on a bathroom stickers to be read on the loo – promoting gimmicky ideas yourself while lambasting the campaigns of others, and ignoring the clear problem written about gimmicks in promoting breast cancer awareness…. why did you ignore the elephant in the room looking over your shoulder?

      1. C - the supposed man hater

        I guess because I didn’t even notice breast cancer awareness month (shitty answer but its the truth, sorry) and today someone told me about the Movember event in their workplace.
        I asked them what charity it was raising money for. They didn’t know.
        So I went and looked it up. I was very mildly irked by the separation of the issue’s at hand and the name. Breast cancer awareness month is indeed a bunch of pink BS, where barely any money gets diverted to research – but at least its in the name.

        So yeah, It made me think back to college and all the beards and moustaches with not a oenny going to a charity. and I had a little tweet about it, as you do.

        Which led my train of through back to last months Mental health Month – which I did pay attention to. – btw, I also throught that’s gimmicky. So I googled a bit about their men’s mental health section and it goes on a bit about how different mens issues are.
        I get that we really need to validate issues for men – but I personally sometimes feel a little annoyed we assume the same doesn’t need to be done for women. So I tweeted mentioning how sometimes men in my depression support group (held by Aware, I recommend if anyone needs it) – which was 90% male attendee’s other men would say to me that it must be easier, being a woman. And what sucked was that it was easier to say I felt there was something wrong with me. But after that it seemed harder. I had to jump through a lot of hoops to convince a doctor I wasn’t just hormonal, as through after 10 years of menstruating, I wouldn’t know the difference.

        Sometimes my personal stories and stances feed into my tweets,
        Please note I didn’t tweet in a hashtag, or at the Movemeber account, I use this account to tell people when book club is on, and to spare my friends and family my ramblings about gender on my personal Twitter account.

        So sorry I honestly forgot it was breast cancer month and didn’t tweet at the time about it? Ireland was much more focused on mental health month.

        I guess since I chose to put ‘feminist’ in the name of a club its my job to clear up everything that annoys you about every single feminist everywhere?

        I also put in my later tweet “if it works i’m all for it”.
        I am not against Movember, and I don’t want to lose anymore of my friends to suicide.Grow your beard if you want, I really don’t care. I was literally trying to advocate we remember the cause at the center of it. and I guess I became your punching bag for whatever kind of baggage you have? I guess you just are defensive of beards? I don’t know.

        Though its fairly hypocritical you are mocking PTSD, a very debilitating mental health condition primarily suffered by men, while calling me a misandrist for critiquing Movember.

        1. Tony

          I think youre being called a misandrist because you come across as a man hating feminist. Occupational hazard I guess.

        2. Sara P.

          Please don’t use an account called “Feminists of Dublin” to talk about your personal feelings. That is basically the problem here that no one is actually able to put into words.

          You are suddenly taking away the voice of others and assuming a group identity. It doesn’t matter if you don’t use hashtags or @s in your little rants – keep that to your own twitter account. If you don’t do that on your own account ” to spare [your] friends and family [your] ramblings about gender” then what gives you the right to do that on the FOD page?

          You are basically hiding behind a group page to spout your own thoughts, and dragging a the feminist movement in the dirt.

  12. DMG

    The outrage here is ridiculous.
    the twitter writer is quite clearly asking/starting a discussion about whether the campaign raises enough awareness about the *actual* issue, rather than about mustaches. Yes, anything that starts a conversation is good, but could it be better? Could it be tweeked to provide more money for prostate cancer?

    Why are men and womens problems treated like they are different? Its a valid question, why make one out to be easy to overcome but the other more difficult? Surely if you pit one against the other no one wins? Men think things are harder for them so they are less likely to talk about them because its easier for ‘others’.

    Why is everyone jumping up and down about this? Because its from an account with the word ‘feminist’ in it? If that exact same thing was written by an account with ‘mens rights’ or ‘*fill in someones name here*’ no brows would be raised.

    Engage with the points rather than twitch about them.

    1. jeremy kyle

      We’re not all jumping up and down about this.
      But, speaking from my own personal experience – I think it would be more accurate to say men actually think things are easier from them and as a result don’t want to be seen complaining about something because they think others have it worse.

      1. DMG

        True, the general tone of the thread is ridiculous though.

        Its a vicious circle then. Do you think that is just men or as a society in general? Because I put off seeking help for several years because i considered my issues trivial and didn’t want to be wasting peoples time. I did eventually and am incredible grateful for the outcome, but I still don’t seem to think that its worth mentioning as a ‘mental health’ issue, which is a bizarre way for me to think (i’m female).

        Do you think the original post had a point about F/M issues being treated separately and portrayed as lesser/greater and if this might actually be creating an issue?

  13. St. John Smythe

    C – you seem very egotistical. Sorry.

    That gimmicky charity campaigns should be examined more is without doubt, but you ruin the one decent point by constantly bringing the topic back to yourself or your self-interested concerns, and by making false comparatives. And posting these again and again and again, writing in circles.

  14. John Gallen

    Ah hear… FOD blocked me, and pinned their response to my tweet in their ‘moments’ category. Like a badge of victory from some imagined battle, my avatar held aloft as if for some presumed shaming by the mighty Femofdublin pfft…. https://twitter.com/i/moments/793467064056967169 LOL

    Earlier, the tweeters first response was, for having submitted the above to Broadsheet, was to accuse me of mocking PTSD sufferers… moi, do that….. don’t even go there…

    FOD, I’ve read more than enough of your mindlessly focused ‘feminist lens’ views in your tweets, and on here today, your lies, your faux politeness, accusations, despicable assertions and assumptions….sure look it, now I know you really are not worth engaging further.

    And now that you’ve not just linked to this post and made it a ‘moment’, others may find out to.

  15. Sara P.

    Please don’t use an account called “Feminists of Dublin” to talk about your personal feelings. That is basically the problem here that no one is actually able to put into words.

    You are suddenly taking away the voice of others and assuming a group identity. It doesn’t matter if you don’t use hashtags or @s in your little rants – keep that to your own twitter account. If you don’t do that on your own account ” to spare [your] friends and family [your] ramblings about gender” then what gives you the right to do that on the FOD page?

    You are basically hiding behind a group page to spout your own thoughts, and dragging a the feminist movement in the dirt.

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