62 thoughts on “Ask A Broadsheet Reader

  1. Rob_G

    There is a housing crisis, and someone is building some new houses – I think it qualifies as ‘good’ news.

      1. Rob_G

        4,000 new units (both apartments and houses, so not sure if your ‘low-density’ comment is accurate), at a time when Dublin needs all the new units it can get. And right next to the Luas line.

        No, not ‘the best news ever’ – just ‘good’ news.

        1. Fact Checker

          The story implies an average household size of 3.75. This is plausible if it is a development of 5-bed houses reserved for people with very large families.

          Which of course it is not.

          So that part clearly is fake news.

        2. Nigel

          On the one hand, yes it’s great to see a new development starting. On the other hand, I am not convinced that planing, building regulations and financing have been sufficiently reformed since the boom. if at all. I have forebodings.

          1. Nigel

            Well, they held off making any reforms until the pressure on housing got too great so that any further delays would be seen as prolonging the homeless crisis and deepening the property mess, so mostly my fears are being entirely confirmed, thanks.

        1. Nigel

          Because I am a creeping Jesus negative hippie tree-hugging naysayer of the sort who threatened to spoil everyone’s good time in the boom by asking awkward questions and making unwelcome observations. But who wants to hear that sort of thing nowadays?

          1. No more mr nice guy

            You are far worse than that actually. Also: Begging for attention with verbose, unfunny, excruciating rejoinders in a vain attempt to display some kind of moral authority.

          2. Nigel

            ‘You are far worse than that actually.’

            I dream big.

            No, wait.

            I hallucinate with magnificent grandiosity, worm.

      2. Fact Checker

        This is very much NOT ribbon development* nor is it particularly low density.

        *Detached houses spread haphazardly along roads in rural areas

        1. Nigel

          No, that’s one-off housing,isn’t it? Ribbon development is the building of suburbs further and further out along motorways, at least that’s how I understood it. Whatever the term, it was undesirable, putting overwhelming strain on infrastructure and public transport, leading to horrific traffic problems, horrible commute times, ghost estates and general isolation.

          1. Rob_G

            “Ribbon development is the building of suburbs further and further out along motorways, at least that’s how I understood it. “

            – you understood incorrectly

          2. classter

            They are both, sort of ribbon development.

            The more concerning one, in an Irish context, is that posited by Fact Checker.

            The Cherrywood scheme is being built between existing suburbs & it is located on public transport, the Luas (as well as the motorway)

          3. classter

            They are both, sort of ribbon development.

            The more concerning one, in an Irish context, is that posited by Fact Checker.

            The Cherrywood scheme is being built between existing suburbs & it is located on public transport, the Luas (as well as the motorway).

    1. Vivienne

      Ah here. It’s Thursday… The Irish Times are in the business of selling property advertising, it’s their bread and butter. Let’s not forget the owners of Myhome.ie are probably going to benefit from the advertising spreads that come with this development.

      It strikes me as a puff piece in disguise, a good news story that benefits the developer and the advertising revenue department of The Irish Times. While I wouldn’t classify it as ‘Fake News’, I wouldn’t classify it as news either that would warrant inclusion on the front page of their website. So it’s advertising dressed up as news.

      1. classter

        So a major housing scheme and new ‘town centre’ commencing on the edge of a city with a housing crisis is not news?

        However you feel about the scheme or even this type of development, it clearly is news.

  2. dav

    Further confirmation of how we as a nation never learn from our past mistakes. And how fg are as bad as ff ever were.

      1. dav

        just getting ravaged by savage civilwarshirt sheep, no biggie.
        Nobody should take the apologists of traitors very seriously

        1. No more mr nice guy

          Dav yesterday I gave you an opportunity to respond to the question of whether you ever consider alternative viewpoints. You refused to accept my generous advice. Accordingly I feel no one should take you even remotely seriously. They’re laughing at you Dav, not with you.

    1. classter

      I would say that this is confimation that we partially learn from our mistakes.

      A relatively high-density development, built around a new town centre, on public transport.

      That’s what we want, right?

  3. steve k

    its quite common in the irish newspaper industry for ad sales reps to offer editorial coverage (which will not be tagged as advertorial) in exchange for the customer taking out an ad.

    1. classter

      Why is this an example of that?

      I have just read the article. They seem to have played a fairly straight bat to me, reporting the plans, quoting the developer, giving the basic history of the site.

      The property supplement continues to be a disgrace but this article seems pretty innocuous to me.

      Unless you expect all news articles to be editorialised & editorialised in a manner which aligns with your opinions

  4. Andy Moore

    Advertising in totality , important for the County which makes up much of it’s subscriber base though. What in reality makes a paper local ??

  5. john

    it is news but its written as an ad. No mention of any of the issues such as being nearly 10 miles from the city centre on an already full Luas line or the already chronic traffic issues around rush hour in the area.

    Also the original sign said up to 9500 homes, anyone know why this has suddenly become 4,000? I assume its an attempt to avoid objections to phase 1.

    1. Cian

      That chunk of land will also be the “second-largest office park in Dublin” as well as a “mixed use town centre”. So not all of the people that choose to live there will be getting the Luas into town or driving anywhere. It is building all the infrastructure for people to live, work and play within walking/cycling distance. It’s also situated on the M50 so has great access by road.

      1. No more mr nice guy

        There always some whining gibbon going postal on this about anything that might resemble progress.
        See also: Nigel

  6. Kolmo

    Can’t wait for the massive site hoardings with enigmatic lifestyle photos of symmetric people straddling the kitchen tops or maybe holding an ironing board seductively, like they had up in Darndale/Belermine/Ballypirite.

    SoChe 50 (South of Cherrywood, M50 Exit..)

    1. martco

      Heheh
      maybe they’ll have another go at convincing us we too can live just like Jamie & Louise Redknapp

  7. JAMS

    The traffic in that area (M/N11 and M50 Southbound) in the evenings is crazy. There is normally tailbacks from Cherrywood to the Bray south exit.

  8. Junkface

    I would love it if this really did turn out as a good news story for housing, for first time buyers, for new families but at the back of my mind there’s always a niggling doubt that there will be shortcuts taken, materials scimped on, poorly insulated, tiny average room sizes, poorly planned neighbourhoods, back handers, all in all a typical Irish Clusterf*** where the victims are working class/middle class people just trying to lead normal lives and will have their money cheated/stolen or their mortgages sold to Vulture funds.

  9. martco

    one thing I’d take a large bet on is that in the end there won’t be any houses for sale in that sprawl for under €500k

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