This morning.

At the corner of Cook Street and the R108, near St Audeon’s Park, Dublin 8.

Donal O’Dowd saw a group of people appear to check the pulse of a man lying on the street, while a man next to him was being consoled.

It’s believed the man was homeless but this hasn’t been confirmed.

At around 7.50am, the Dublin Fire Brigade arrived and, soon after, a blanket was placed over the man’s body. An ambulance and gardai then arrived.

A request for information has been lodged with the Garda Press Office.

Update:
The man was in his 40s, originally from Poland and was homeless, it has been confirmed by Inner City Helping Homeless (ICCH)

Pics: Donal O’Dowd

Update:

Investigation after man found dead on Dublin street (RTÉ)

UPDATE:

In a statement, the Garda Press Office said:

Gardai are investigating the sudden death of a male in his 40s who was found on Cook Street, this morning the 6th of November 2018 at 8am. Gardai and emergency services attended the scene. Male was pronounced dead at scene and brought to morgue. Post mortem will be carried out. A file will be prepared for the Coroner’s Court.

Update: Enough

26 thoughts on “In Dublin 8

  1. Daisy Chainsaw

    How is it being used for politics? Stating facts is now somehow offensive to some political beliefs? Maybe those offended by 27 people dying on the streets in just over a year need to have a better sense of decency in politics.

    Reply
    1. realPolithicks

      There are lots of people Daisy who do not want to hear this kind of news, out of sight is out of mind as the saying goes. Because things may be going well in their own lives they like to look the other way and pretend everything is wonderful.

      Reply
      1. Daisy Chainsaw

        That was a reply to a post that’s been deleted, but yeah, someone objected to 27 deaths being pointed out as making it political. I’m sure the DOBine gael media will be digging for dirt to stop people having any kind of sympathy for another person dying on the streets.

        Reply
  2. Shane Duffy

    What a tragedy. The Polish community need to roll their sleeves up and start help out their fallen. A flight home for that poor man would have cost very little.

    Reply
    1. gerry

      Because a house would magically appear for him in Poland? Don’t use a man’s death as opportunity to spread anti-immigrant views.

      Reply
      1. McVitty

        Transience is a terrible thing and a dead man in the street is proof. Had he been closer to people who cared about him (assuming there were), he would have had a better chance…

        Reply
  3. Dolores power

    It doesn’t matter the nationally . Someone on our streets has died because this government don’t care about people . He was some mother’s son, a brother, a uncle This has to stop once and for all. None of us are safe at the hands of the greedy corrupted government running the people of this country to the ground. People will say oh foreigners emigrate. Doesn’t matter because the flutes in the suits don’t Care what who you are . Once their pockets stay lined. When are we in this country going to wake up and let them see who we are and refuse to accept any more crap.

    Reply
    1. Col

      I would assume the contention is that the government should be responsible for limiting homelessness, or reducing it, or at least preventing it from continuing to get worse.
      You could theoretically complain about healthcare issues without offering to treat people yourself and not be considered a hypocrite.

      Reply
      1. Cian

        The government has budgeted €1,830,000,000 to housing next year.

        How much more should it allocate? and where would any extra money come from?

        Reply
  4. Sibling of Daedalus

    Very sad for anyone, Irish or Polish, to die homeless on the street in this country in the twenty first century.

    Perhaps it would have been better to spend money on safe accommodation for the homeless than the Charleton Tribunal. Do we really need the philosophical ex-judicia ruminations of a High Court judge to tell us what we know already, and to provide an excuse for the Government to ‘vindicate’ Frances and Noirin? And who thought it was a good idea to make a former prosecutor the person to decide about Garda misconduct?

    Interesting that Maurice McCabe hasn’t given an interview to Broadsheet yet. He seems to have appeared everywhere else by now, including many places that didn’t give him very favourable coverage earlier. Not impressed.

    Reply
    1. Papi

      Should I change my avatar to Ollie? That might allow me to say whatever the hell I want then, instead of being moderated constantly.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *