‘Sufficient Evidence To Prosecute One Former Solider’

at | 18 Replies

From top: James Wray, William McKinney; statement from DPP of Northern Ireland

“It has been concluded that there is sufficient available evidence to prosecute one former soldier, Soldier F, for the murder of James Wray and William McKinney; and for the attempted murders of Joseph Friel, Michael Quinn, Joe Mahon and Patrick O’Donnell.

“In respect of the other 18 suspects, including 16 former soldiers and two alleged Official IRA members, it has been concluded that the available evidence is insufficient to provide a reasonable prospect of conviction.”

The Director of Public Prosecutions for Northern Ireland, Stephen Herron, this morning.

Pic via Judith Hill

Earlier: Meanwhile, In Derry

UPDATE:

This morning…

William McKinney’s brother, Mickey McKinney said:

“We’d like to remind everyone that no prosecution or, if it comes to it, no conviction, does not mean ‘not guilty’.

“It does not mean that no crime was committed, it does not mean that those soldiers acted in a dignified and appropriate way.

“It simply means that if these crimes had been investigated properly when they happened and evidence gathered at the time then the outcome would have been different.

“We know that Lord Saville’s report’s findings on the actions of soldiers that day, that all the casualties were either intended targets of the soldiers or the results of shots fired indiscriminately at people.

“That no soliders fired in response to attacks or threatened attacks, that no soldiers fired in a state of panic, and that soldiers opened fire either in the belief that no one, an area toward which they respectively fired, was posing a threat or causing death or serious injury… or not anyone there was posing such a threat.

“These are not the sort of comments levelled at innocent people.

“The passage of time makes charges difficult in this case and in other cases. But the passage of time should not be used as a form of blanket immunity to block proper investigations.”

William McKinney, an amateur photographer, was aged 27 and engaged to be married when he was killed at the civil rights march on January 30, 1972.

He was at the Bloody Sunday march to capture it on a camera he received as a Christmas present. The Derry Journal printer was shot while he ran for cover.

James Wray was 22 and also engaged to be married when he died.

He and his family attended the march after going to mass.

James, who worked in a bar and a dancehall, was also shot while he ran for cover.

The Saville report found James was shot twice in the back and that the second shot was probably fired as he lay wounded.

Bloody Sunday: The Victims (BBC)

UPDATE:

UPDATE:

UPDATE:

18 thoughts on “‘Sufficient Evidence To Prosecute One Former Solider’

  1. Formerly known as @ireland.com

    Typical British justice. They are protecting murderers. How many witnesses do they need? Border poll now.

    Reply
  2. eoin

    The PSNI only started a criminal investigation of the Bloody Sunday murders in 2010, 40 years after the atrocity. No wonder there’s not sufficient evidence to prosecute most of the murderers of 14 innocent civil rights marchers.

    Reply
  3. millie st murderlark

    Shameful. Absolutely sickening for the families.

    Typical British carry on. It’s not like we haven’t seen an daily parade of it for the past two or more years.

    Reply
    1. Martco

      + thanks for that link, first time to hear that detail, the bit with the soldier’s radio comms was especially interesting

      Reply
  4. Truth in the News

    Some of those who orchestrated and formulated the policy to shoot and kill unarmed
    civilians on the streets of Derry on Sunday 30th January 1972 are still alive, what about
    Lt Col Derek Wilford aged 86, no less than yesterday, he is still adamant that he stands
    by “his men” …..he was part of the conspiracy to kill and it led all the way back to
    Downing St, the plan was to draw fire from the IRA and mop them up then and
    there, the civilians were only “bullet fodder” to initiate the confrontation, and it would
    also put an end to street riots and marches, i.e when all else fails “use lead” except
    nearly 50 years later, its not forgotten or forgiven, and like Amritsar and My Lai it is
    State Terrorism…..there is a simple solution, publicly name and shame all those
    who took part, the only reason those who pulled the trigger are not charged is that
    they would tell the full story, it is any wonder the MOD are footing the legal bill.

    Reply
    1. eoin

      Some of those who were officers on the day were given honours by the Queen and are lionised in the British media (and on occasion, in the Irish media).

      Reply
      1. Truth in the News

        Head of British Army on the fateful day was Robert Ford now deceased, he was at a
        certain stage of his army career on the staff of one Lord Louis Mountbatten, and at
        several functions both formal and informal seemed to have ear of one Lizzy the second
        All these things are not mere coincidence …..they got away it in Kenya,Cyprus, India
        and with a weak and corrupt regime south of the Border, it was worth one last throw of the
        dice.

        Reply
  5. Dub Spot

    Surprised anyone is being prosecuted at all. But let’s not dismiss the significance of this. The Parachute Regiment (“our boys”) are now in the spotlight again as are their posh masters on the ground and in Westminster.

    If this prosecution reveals more facts about that terrible day in the trial, then good. Whether it will go anywhere or not, we’ll see. One thing is sure — if this was in the Republic of Ireland the prosecution would never happen and/or the subsequent events would fall apart.

    Now is not the time for virtue signalling — NB: Irish Times, RTE, etc who did NOTHING to cover the discrimination and rottenness of the Northern Ireland state in the run up to The Troubles. And on this breaking news just look at what we’re being asked if we’re staying in for on Friday and Saturday night.

    Peace.

    Reply
    1. Truth in the News

      The reason they did nothing and reported less, is that it would upset the status co and
      the soft and comfortable jobs, just as they ignored the North, they also neglected a
      almost twice as many in the South and were only too delighted to export them as
      their was a constant flow of remittances back home that kept the country afloat,
      In relation to TV on Friday and Saturday night ……all tellys have an on/off switch
      use it.

      Reply
  6. Gearóid

    The blog An Sionnach Fionn gives a depressing reminder of how the media are still coached in their reporting:

    Meanwhile, from the centre-left Guardian newspaper:

    As well as the 13 who died on the day, 15 others were shot and injured. One of the injured died months later from an inoperable tumour; some consider him the 14th fatality.

    The right-wing Daily Mail:

    As well as the 13 who died, a total of 15 others were shot and injured. One of the injured died months later from an inoperable tumour and some consider him the 14th fatality.

    The Examiner in Ireland:

    As well as the 13 who died on the day, 15 others were shot and injured. One of the injured died months later from an inoperable tumour and some consider him the 14th fatality.

    The “Irish” Mirror:

    As well as the 13 who died, 15 others were shot and injured. One of the injured died months later from an inoperable tumour and some consider him the 14th fatality.

    Extra.ie:

    As well as the 13 who died, a total of 15 others were shot and injured. One of the injured died months later from an inoperable tumour and some consider him the 14th fatality.

    https://ansionnachfionn.com/2019/03/14/the-irish-and-british-news-media-and-the-bloody-sunday-massacre/

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *