24 thoughts on “Tuesday’s Papers

  1. Cú Chulainn

    Mirror: Boris ex lover in crude attempt to squeeze more cash..
    Star: they’re back on the chips again. Can’t be long before the psycho seagulls turn up to eat them..!!

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  2. GiggidyGoo

    So, as we all knew anyway despite the lies, Dublin and Rosslare aren’t ready for Brexit. The Rosslare situation is that an examination area is 1,5km outside the port area and it looks like the customs people are just going to have to trust truck drivers to go to it as it’s outside the bonded area and only accessible by driving through Rosslare village.
    That, and the exclusion of Ireland from the ‘informal’ talks where all sorts will be discussed and agreed without our input.
    But sure we will be OK. Varadkar is out looking for some more celebrities to get his photo taken with while the real Taoiseach, Coveney does the work.
    Elsewhere the Boy Harris gets stuck into the job at last.
    And who will be liable for the losses incurred at the Apple Escrow account? Why, you and I of course.

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    1. eoin

      How strange, didn’t Paschal Donohue say we (Ireland) would be indemnified by the mangers of the Apple escrow account against losses. That doesn’t sound like the sort of thing Goldman Sachs Group Inc, Amundi SA and BlackRock Inc would do, but hey, if Paschal said it, it must be true.

      https://www.google.ie/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=17&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjA7rHEvfrkAhXSbMAKHegdAUcQFjAQegQIBBAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.pressreader.com%2Fireland%2Firish-examiner%2F20180425%2F281663960615072&usg=AOvVaw3MpEEu6CSjgtiP2ewKYeC8

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      1. Cian

        Yes he did… but you seem to misunderstand.

        The Escrow fund was created, Apple paid in the taxes owed plus interest. The escrow money is being invested. The total value may go up or down. The ownership of the money will be decided by the counts.

        If Apple wins, and the investments are poor and there is only 10bn left: Apple gets the 10bn and Ireland has no liability for the balance.

        If Apple loses, and the investments are poor and there is only 10bn left: Ireland gets the 10bn and Apple has no liability for the balance.

        If Apple wins, and the investments are good and there is 20bn left: Apple gets the full 20bn and Ireland has no claim on the balance.

        If Apple loses, and the investments are good and there is 20bn left: Ireland gets the full 20bn and Apple has no claim on the balance.

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    2. eoin

      Wouldn’t a 10-mile (16 km) “customs zone” in Northern Ireland mean 60% of Northern Ireland was a custom zone. I know that sounds odd but Northern Ireland is a bit like a doughnut with Lough Neagh in the middle. If you take 16kms along the 499 kms border, that would be around 8,000 sq kms if the border was a straight line. There’s 14,130 sq kms in Northern Ireland. Yikes! Of course, the border is not a straight line but it would still mean a huge % of Northern Ireland was a customs zone. Eejits.

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      1. some old queen

        What does ‘mobile technology’ even mean? Trackers on lorries? That is a huge data protection issue because trackers record a lot more than when a vehicle crosses a border- routes, speed, duration of drive etc – and what about lorries inside the zone who do are not planning to cross the border?

        Either way it is still infrastructure so will be ruled out by the EU.

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      2. Cian

        Your sums are way off. The exclusion zone will also include lakes (e.g. Lough Erne)
        The border-zone is most likely less than 3,000km^2

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    3. some old queen

      And once more for the be jazus gigs- no one knows what Breixt is going to be- so how can anyone prepare for it? Even in Kent there is little if any activity because if it does happen, there will be a two year transition period. .

      The only thing that can happen at the end of the month is a crash out which HP have already legislated against – so it is a case of wait and see.

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  3. GiggidyGoo

    We have to feel sorry for the ISIS fighters now. Poor dears have to suffer overcrowding, and smelling the putrid farts of the people either side.
    It’ll be refugee status for them here soon I take it.

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    1. Spud

      Suspected fighters… Are they classified POWs or terrorists?
      I doubt they’ll ever see a courtroom.
      Bound to be plenty of innocent in there.

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  4. eoin

    More comedy in the House of Commons last night, they were debating a gambling clampdown in Northern Ireland. The DUP has been receiving gifts from a company which sells gambling machines, which raised eyebrows previously. Did those gifts distort the DUP’s position last night? Oh yes, it was glorious to watch the shower of hypocrites.

    All of a sudden Ian Paisely junior wants any gambling clampdown to be done by the North’s Assembly (which hasn’t sat for nearly three years). “But there is only one place competent to bring it up to date. It is not this Chamber—look who is interested. Let us not kid ourselves. It is the Northern Ireland Assembly. That is why the Opposition Members who pressed the Government to legislate should have realised how big a mess they were creating, because they are not addressing the real issue. That 1985 legislation is so antiquated that only the Assembly is fit to grapple with it.That is why we would like the Assembly to be encouraged.”

    Yet the DUP have doggedly avoided any talks which might see a return of the Assembly as they (until recently at least) held the balance of power in Westminster.

    Hilarious to see the Bible-thumping DUPers trying to symie gambling legislation.

    https://hansard.parliament.uk/commons/2019-09-30/debates/B22D690D-2EEA-4D12-A62B-5CF297757D56/NorthernIreland(ExecutiveFormationEtc)Act2019Section4

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    1. some old queen

      DUP- we demand no divergence between the governance of NI and GB- ever- EVER- well, apart from abortion, equal marriage, gambling and- anything else WE don’t agree with.

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  5. GiggidyGoo

    I see the UK conservatives want to become the Law and Order party there. Kinda like the blueshirts here. Who can fly their kites the highest though? I’m sure Leo and Preti have a lot in common.

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  6. eoin

    Will the €5 (five) billion National Broadband Plan be signed today following the Cabinet meeting this morning? Despite a cross-party Oireachtas committee demanding alternatives be explored? Despite us facing into Brexit, a slowing economy and an austerity Budget 2020 next Tuesday?

    Banana republic.

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  7. eoin

    And now Paschal Donohue is dragged into the illegal Public Service Card debacle. The Examiner reports

    “It can now be revealed that the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform (DPER), the lead body behind the expansion of the card to services such as passport applications, ordered [in January 2018] the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA) to drop a secondary online authentication method so that MyGovID [which requires a PSC] would be the only application portal available.”

    And more evidence that heading-for-the-doors Regina didn’t share the Data Protection Commissioner’s report with others “new documents indicate that the Department of Children had yet to have sight of the DPC’s final report nearly a week after it was first issued to the Department of Social Protection last month, and was dependent upon the Commissioner’s own press release for information on the report.”

    Why this illegal mass surveillance scandal doesn’t remain front page news until someone in govt is fired or prosecuted, I don’t know.

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    1. some old queen

      Yes I tried to login into MyGov recently and could not because I do not have a card. My query had not thing to do with social welfare and yet, they were insisting on such?

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  8. eoin

    In the UK, the Financial Reporting Council [sorta like our Chartered Accountants Ireland but with more teeth and more credibility] has launched an investigation “into the audit by EY of the financial statements of Thomas Cook Group Plc for the year ended 30 September 2018.”

    https://www.frc.org.uk/news/october-2019/investigation-in-connection-with-the-financial-sta

    Closer to home, yesterday passed without the financial statements for Wrightbus being published at Companies House. The 2018 statements were due by 30 September, and Wrightbus is now liable for a £750 fine, though that’s probably the least of their troubles.

    The 2017 Wrightbus statements, for the year ending 31 December 2017, showed a company in rude health and it is curious to some observers how it could deteriorate to such an extent that it reportedly needs a £30 million cash injection in mid 2019.

    Reply

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