Yes They Will Yes

at | 9 Replies

This morning.

RTÉ has announced that an almost 30-hour production of James Joyce’s Ulysses will be broadcast on RTÉ Radio 1 Extra to celebrate Bloomsday on Tuesday,  June 16.

Anne Louise Foley writes:

The full dramatised production – originally broadcast in 1982 (top) to celebrate the centenary of Joyce, and totalling 29 hours and 45 minutes in duration – will begin at the same time as both Stephen Dedalus’ and Leopold Bloom’s journey through Dublin begins in the book: 8am on 16 June.

The production was recorded by Marcus MacDonald, directed by William Styles, and performed by the RTÉ Players, featuring Pegg Monahan, Patrick Dawson, Ronnie Walsh, Brendan Cauldwell, Colette Procter, Barbara McCaughey, Kate Minogue, Denis Staunton, Laurence Foster, Conor Farrington and Déirdre O’Meara….

Listen live on RTÉ Radio 1 Extra, or via podcast here.

 

9 thoughts on “Yes They Will Yes

  1. scottser

    if i had no responsibilities or commitments whatsoever, i would happily drop an acid and listen to this in its entirety.

    Reply
    1. Cú Chulainn

      Er.. is this the recording from 1982 ? Could they not produce a new version.. maybe Live.. it might have some traction then..

      Reply
  2. Gabby

    For those who enjoy literature lite they could employ actors to read out 100 titles of Mills & Boon romances.

    Reply
  3. bisted

    …this will be the third time RTE have done the complete read through…I think they did it in 2004 to mark the centenary of the day in which the book is set – 16 June 1904.

    Joyce maintained that if Dublin was ever destroyed it could be rebuilt from the pages of his book…alas, no longer the case. The Ormond Hotel which is the setting for the Sirens chapter is about to be demolished and is the latest example of the wanton destruction of Dublin…

    Reply
    1. bisted

      …nearly forgot the most important anniversary of all…the first Bloomsday took place on 16 June 1954 and was organised by John (not the least bit proposterous) Ryan…

      Reply
    2. Rob_G

      While I think it’s important to preserve our literary heritage, Joyce already has 3 museums in Dublin, not counting Sweeney’s, so I think that his legacy is safe for the moment (particularly with regard to that particular book). You can’t preserve the entire of the city centre in aspic – the city has to be be for people living there today, too.

      Reply
      1. bisted

        …perhaps Dublin should have been preservered but it’s much too late now…tourists cannot understand the destruction…they shake in disbelief that a wonderful icon like the house on Ushers Island which was the setting for The Dead would be replaced by a back-packers hostel…

        Reply

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