Wolves At Molyneux

at | 57 Replies


Yesterday.

Dublin City Council has approved a 224-bedroom hotel at Molyneux Yard in the Liberties, Dublin 8.

Directly behind the Vicar Street concert venue.

Which is also being redeveloped…


…into an hotel.

Good times.

Previously: More Floors, Vicar?

57 thoughts on “Wolves At Molyneux

        1. Janet, dreams of big guns

          co -living…shudder, other people’s unwashed dishes, music, finger prints on cupboard doors, hairs in the shower, bins not emptied, dirt walked into carpets, their manky unwashed lounge wear, I’d be done for murder

          Reply
      1. Janet, dreams of big guns

        I’d be very surprised of our tourism industry bounces back , if it does it will take years, I work in that industry and I can tell you it doesn’t look good, it will be like that volcano that killed off plant life for years

        Reply
        1. JEH

          Without pubs, arts, and music, what does Dublin still have to offer the would-be traveller? They’re not coming for the architecture, and even if they were, it’s a landscape of boring offices, hotels, student accommodation, and derelict buildings. The countryside has it’s appeal of course, but what percent of all vacationers travel outside Dublin and what’s the percent of foreign spend outside Dublin? As far as I can tell, the only people willing to pay our prices are 20-30-somethings, not families. So again, what is Dublin without pubs, arts, and music?

          Reply
          1. Janet, dreams of big guns

            plus our projected biggest growing market was the Chinese…so all that China ready Failte training rather a waste

          2. Rob_G

            “Without pubs, arts, and music, what does Dublin still have to offer the would-be traveller? “

            Jesus Christ, they are literally redeveloping a place used for parking and warehousing…

    1. JEH

      Exactly. Given that we’re in serious need of housing, seems like building apartments would be a guaranteed revenue stream, unlike hotels.

      Hotel developers shouldn’t get any emergency funding from the government if they go looking for it when the numbers don’t pan out.

      Reply
  1. Ghost of Yep

    Can anyone shed some light on why we are building so many hotels in the city? Even a reasonable hypothesis? Bizarre.

    Reply
    1. george

      There is demand for hotel rooms (at least was before covid19) when the hotels were planned and there is money to be made.

      Reply
      1. Ghost of Yep

        I knew there was an increased demand but would have to claim ignorance on the numbers. Maybe the number built is tied to a study/report that isn’t everyday information. It just hasn’t had a Covid reset yet either.

        Maybe I’m just a backwards oul poo but the distinct character (accept the negatives of course) that in and around the city centre had is changing to an “any other city” vibe.

        Reply
      1. Vanessanelle

        And more than just the ‘Industrial Use’ treatment
        Following the CT crash, Irish Hotels got re-rated
        And cost Local Authorities 000000000s
        It was a bailout that no economist is prepared to calculate a value on

        Also in that area, the original Urban Renewal scheme devised for O’Connell Street back in the late 90s
        Was specifically extended up to Vicar Street to support its development ahead of the MTV Awards in 99(?) as the Venue was to be used for the After Parties
        And in fairness to the lads in DCC at the time they took in other applications from around the Liberties
        100% Capital Ex over 10 years btw
        Now that that’s run out, it would make sense that DCC have come up with something else for the ‘Industrial Use’ landowners

        Just saying

        Is it any surprise to learn that Irish Hotels have a lobby that’s every bit as affective and the Bankers

        Reply
    1. Barry the Hatchet

      + Aloft at the other end of New Row South.
      + The student/short-term let accommodation just beside Aloft, the grounds of which were supposed to be open to the public, but never have been.
      + The hotel that’s been granted planning permission just across the road.
      + The Maldron on Clanbrassil Street.
      + The student accommodation being built on Cork Street.
      + The student/short-term let accommodation which has been granted planning permission in Newmarket Square.

      Reply
  2. Barry the Hatchet

    JFC this is getting ridiculous. That part of Dublin 8 is already stuffed to the gills with hotels and student accommodation. Meanwhile there are fupp all amenities for the kids who live in the area and genuine community gathering places like Newmarket have been shut down to make way for ….more fupping hotels and student accommodation.

    Reply
    1. Paulus

      I really miss Newmarket. Herself and meself used to go every Sunday morning.
      Neighbours may have thought we were going to mass!

      Reply
      1. Janet, dreams of big guns

        I wish there were more farmers markets, there are loads of bursting allotments near where I live, there’s no way one man and his family can eat that many cabbages etc, I wish there was a weekly market where this gorgeous overflow could be sold, the veggies in supermarkets are poor forced tasteless shadows of veg

        Reply
        1. Jack Of Ireland

          I have an extensive veg patch in the grounds, whilst it is true most things come in a glut, courgettes at the mo, there is little difference in taste between home grown and supermarche these days. There is simply the pleasure of growing.

          Reply
          1. Janet, dreams of big guns

            really, I used to have space for cucumber, tomatoes and beans and I really noticed a difference in flavor, now they got a lot of real heat, I had to water like a loon, do you think that’s lack of sun maybe ?

  3. class wario

    i almost admire the neck of them to push ahead with the millions of hotels in the middle of a tourism industry destroying pandemic

    Reply
    1. Jack Of Ireland

      There ia also the office block boom, and Covid has shown that there is no need for large offices, a lot of office workers will remain working from home in the future. Also open plan is less pandemic safe than small office rooms

      Reply
      1. Janet, dreams of big guns

        yep himself will eventually only ever go back to three days a week in the office, same for a lot of my friends in IT, very few people miss being in the office at all

        Reply
  4. Dr.Fart

    i have many american friends, and the word amongst americans coming to ireland, their top tip; only stay one night in dublin. it’s too touristy, go see rural ireland” .. while i will enjoy seeing these hotels fail, i hate that the buildings will still be there. ugly as hell, and give nothing to the community. just monuments to ignorance.

    Reply
    1. JEH

      Fair play to them! For the 10 years I’ve lived in the Big Smoke Americans would only ever spend a weekend in Dublin as part of a 2 week whirlwind tour of Europe. They’d be right to fly in and feck straight off to the West if they want to see any of the Ireland they’ve imagined or been sold.

      Reply
      1. Dr.Fart

        absolutely. and that’s why its a “tip”, they know there’s not much point spending time in Dublin, as it’s just a sea of hotels and attempts to be like other cities across the world, like renaming places “quarters” and “silicon docks” etc. If people come to see ireland, they don’t want to see a place mimicing where theyre from. its so short sighted, this constant attempt to be like other nations.

        Reply
        1. Janet, dreams of big guns

          Dublin’s very own identity crisis like some confused teenager trying to be an LA skateboarding kid instead of copping on and playing the cards it was dealt

          Reply
          1. Dr.Fart

            it’s infuriating. A city steeped in history and character that is doted on by the world. And some eejits in DCC are desperate to make it as american as possible. Paving over centuries of culture.

  5. Gabby

    Hotels have priced their rooms out of the pocket range of young tourists in the 18-30 years age sector. Independent hostels, some of them in cluttered buildings, are the only accommodation the youth tourists can consider. The B & B establishments were used sometimes up to the 1990s, but they too have priced their rooms out of the youth market. Older individuals and couples with children visiting Dublin have noticeably resorted to the independent hostels too. I think some companies are building high-price hotels as a form of longterm capital savings, just as in times gone by companies hoarded gold bars in bank vaults. Think what this is doing to the economy and inner city working communities.

    Reply
  6. GiggidyGoo

    In a few decades, the Dublin Tours will be visiting and citing these hotels as historic buildings while Dublin itself loses its character.

    Reply
    1. SOQ

      +1

      It is like they are deliberately sucking the soul out of the city. Hoards of tourists walking around staring at each other and unironically complaining about how ‘touristy’ it all is.

      The fault lies with the council for allowing it to happen or course.

      Reply
      1. Cian

        Damned if they do; damned if they don’t.
        If you add more hotels you can pack in more tourists… but lose the historic feel;
        but if you don’t add hotels you have a tourist attraction …. but there are no tourists because there is no accommodation.

        Either way, Dublin was never an attractive city architecturally.

        Reply
          1. Janet, dreams of big guns

            oh I forgot most of our immigrant workers living six to a room in bunk beds have gone home

    2. Rob_G

      Yes, it would really be detracting from the aesthetics brought by the bookies and the mini-market in the photo if they were to build a nice new building there…

      Reply
  7. Hicksonian

    Vicar St. to become a hotel. They are literally cancelling culture. And they will know us by the trail of zombified, corporate, cookie cutter hotels. There’s a band to throw a few rusty coins at, not that they’d get a gig in hotel land.

    Reply
    1. Rob_G

      And do you think building new developments in the area is going to make it more likely, or less likely, that these buildings will be reoccupied/redeveloped?

      Reply

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