Grafton Street, Dublin 2 this morning

This morning/afternoon.

According to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre a quarter of all new cases of Covid-19 in the last two weeks have been among younger people aged between 15 and 24

Via RTÉ:

A closer look at the breakdown of ages though, shows there were reportedly 114 cases in young children aged between 0 and 4, while a further 325 cases occurred in children between 5 and 14.

The highest number of cases reported in this two-week period is among 15 to 24-year-olds with 984 cases among that age group.

There were also 708 cases among the 25 to 34-year-olds, 576 cases in the 35 to 44 age bracket, 552 among the 45 to 54-year-olds, 375 in the 55 to 64 age group, 236 cases among 65 to 74-year-olds and 106 cases in the 75 to 84 group.

There were just 44 cases recorded among people aged over 85.

Anyone?

No room for complacency over Covid-19, warns Glynn (RTÉ)

Rollingnews

58 thoughts on “Generation Game

    1. Cian

      I agree that you can’t look at the 430 cases from yesterday and compare that to March/April and make any useful comparison or get any meaning from it.

      However, if you look at the number of positive cases this week, and compare to last week, and to the week before, and to the week before – you can see trends. At the moment the numbers are going up…. there are more people with Covid now than 2, 4 or 6 weeks ago. It is spreading.

      If you look at the numbers in hospital and ICU this is borne out… it’s getting worse. (albeit slowly)

      Reply
    2. george

      Fake news. The numbers are for confirmed cases. The definition of a confirmed case in Ireland is someone who has tested positive:

      “Laboratory criteria
      Detection of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid in a clinical specimen”

      “Confirmed case
      Any person meeting the laboratory criteria”

      Source:
      https://www.hpsc.ie/a-z/respiratory/coronavirus/novelcoronavirus/casedefinitions/#:~:text=COVID%2D19%20interim%20case%20definition,-Version%205.9&text=A%20patient%20with%20severe%20acute,fully%20explains%20the%20clinical%20presentation.

      Reply
      1. GiggidyGoo

        How do you know what Nphet are quoting? They’re saying confirmed ‘cases’. They’re not distinguishing what type of cases, so it wouldn’t surprise me that they are lumping all in – including this “COVID-19 interim case definition” It’s a case, it’s been confirmed as a case (even if tagged as an interim case) unless Nphet specifically says it isn’t.

        So actual numbers in hospital, icu and deaths is the only measure that should be used to report this.

        Reply
        1. george

          I know because I can read.

          “As of midnight Saturday 26 September, the HPSC has been notified of 430 confirmed cases of COVID-19. There has now been a total of 34,990 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ireland.”

          I doesn’t take an immunologist to understand that when NPHET say “confirmed cases” they mean “confirmed cases”.

          https://www.gov.ie/en/press-release/577b4-statement-from-the-national-public-health-emergency-team-sunday-27-september/

          Reply
          1. GiggidyGoo

            Except the HSPC can then disclaim it’s own calculations by a nice little term such as “validation of data at the HPSC has resulted in the denotification of ….. (x amount of cases)” Is t it great that we can rely on such information?

            NPHET don’t use the term ‘Confirmed Cases’ which is strict definition. The use the line “ ‘x’ number of cases have been confirmed.” There is quite a difference in the meaning, depending on what’s said. ‘Have been confirmed’ can therefore include such cases as interim cases.

            People aren’t here all of the time you know to reply to you at a time that suits you.

        2. Nigel

          Yeah, why would we want to know how much a highly contagious virus particularly deadly to older people and people with underlying conditions and showing signs of long-term chronic conditions in survivors is spreading through the population? Somehow a narrowfocus on current low numbers of ICU admissions translates to making the government look bad, so let’s forget about the public good and do that!

          Reply
      2. SOQ

        And did it ever occur to any of our “investigative” journalists to ask the HSE why for the first time in history they are using a medical term pertaining to treatment for what is nothing more than a PCR swab test?

        Reply
        1. Cian

          Because they always use that word case.

          Look at the Influenza Surveillance Weekly Reports:

          I randomly selected one and the word case is listed 37 times
          :
          https://www.hpsc.ie/a-z/respiratory/influenza/seasonalinfluenza/surveillance/influenzasurveillancereports/previousinfluenzaseasonssurveillancereports/20172018season/Influenza_Surveillance_Report_Week%2012%202018_20172018_finalv1.0_28032018.pdf

          They count “cases” all the way in reports from 2001.

          Reply
  1. george

    Anyone what?

    This reflects the relative levels of care being take by various demographics and the declining numbers in older demographics demonstrates that we can control the spread of the virus by making an effort.

    Reply
    1. SOQ

      Or

      That the viruses has already travelled through most communities and the susceptible have already passed. That is what happens with other Coronas and flus- so why would this one be any different?

      Reply
        1. SOQ

          Is there a generational difference or just more young people being tested?

          Even with that, young people are out and about a lot more now so they have a higher chance of contracting it. But if they are not getting sick then what is the problem?

          Reply
          1. Nigel

            A highly contagious virus shown to be particularly deadly to older people and people with underlying conditions and showing signs of long-term chronic effects in survivors running through a part of the population that gets around a lot? No problem.

          2. SOQ

            Like the flu?

            2018 over all fatalities YTD are WAY above this thing Nigel- did you even know there was a bad flu then?

            I certainly didn’t.

          3. Brother Barnabas

            vast majority of people who get the flu recover fully

            I had covid in march and still havent properly recovered- lung capacity isnt right since. I’m fairly young and pretty fit so can only assume it would be even worse if I wasnt

            #not just another flu

          4. Nigel

            I know about the flu every year because every year there are reports about it, about the severity, about the vaccine, about the effects on hospitals, about not going to work if you think you have it. Every year they report on it and every year we hear about it. Unlike the flu this is brand new, it hasn’t been here a year yet, we don’t have a vaccine, and the infection rate comes AFTER lockdown, social distancing, hand washing and mask wearing, oh, and it has burned through old-folks-home like a grim reaper on speed.

      1. Sham Bob

        How can you claim with any certainty that the virus passed through the vulnerable older population when they were coccooning at it’s height and in many cases, since then. Also, when have these flus you’re so fond of killed health care workers?

        Reply
        1. SOQ

          The majority of fatalities were in nursing homes?

          Also what percentage of those health care workers were the same nursing home employees screaming out for PPE at the height of it?

          Reply
          1. Sham Bob

            Height of what? Sure it’s no worse than the flu.

            And when you say PPE, do you mean masks? Sure they don’t work.

  2. Mick

    To put the states more into context, the cases by age group per 100k of population looks like this:

    Age 0-4: 36.8 cases per 100k;
    Age 5-14: 46.8 cases per 100k;
    Age 15-24: 155.9;
    Age 25-34: 114.9;
    Age 35-44: 73.8;
    Age 45-54: 81.8;
    Age 55-64: 68.0;
    Age 65-74: 56.9;
    Age 75-84: 47.3;
    Age 85 +: 54.2.

    Age 15-24 Definitely have the highest case load, but the 25-34 age group aren’t that far behind.
    (Age group stats from CSO: https://statbank.cso.ie/multiquicktables/quickTables.aspx?id=pea01 as at April 2020)

    Reply
  3. Vanessanelle

    Since we’re still no closer to an Exit Strategy
    how about this

    just report – and publish
    the numbers of Covid 19 patients admitted to hospital that day, alongside the total currently occupying an inpatient hospital bed
    ↪ the numbers of Covid 19 inpatients transferred to ICU that day, alongside the total currently occupying an ICU bed
    ↪ the numbers of Covid 19 patients that died that day

    and identify any underlying condition, if one exists

    In reality there is eff all restriction of movement, and different locations, schools, colleges, workplaces, retailers, Government Buildings whatever, all have different arrangements and practices

    AFAIC there is no point in reporting an outbreak in the Ballywherever Institute for Pig Farming and Panel Beating when there’s lads after travelling to wherever, supping pints wherever, living with whoever wherever, shopping wherever, playing pitch n’putt wherever, going training, going to the chipper and getting a bucket of pick n’ mix to watch the soccer wherever

    Flights landed from Poland yesterday, passengers went to their destinations, got ready for work today, kids went to school / creche this morning. And since midnight its off the green list
    Cop at jaysus on here

    Tis either a thing or tisn’t

    Clearly the vast majority of positive cases amount to staying at home in isolation
    Stop generating unnecessary data – and stopping feeding off it

    Reply
    1. Nigel

      Given the lack of restrictions surely there’s all the more reason to keep an eye on its spread through the population? If SOQ’s theory about it having run its course is correct, ICU admissions will remain low and we can all sing haleluias. If ICU admissions start to rise as it spreads, then we’re all fecked and it’s hello second wave, but at least we’ll see it coming.

      Reply
      1. SOQ

        Firstly, if there is a second wave it will the first time in history so let’s knock that one on the head. Secondly, all I am suggesting is that this virus will behave like others and while there will be relatively small peaks- it has run its course.

        Some people seem to think this is some sort of flying HIV but it is not. It is a bad dose for a small percentage and passes through the majority without even them knowing.

        I seriously question where all this irrational fear is coming from.

        There is a new theory on the block btw- and one which at least to me makes sense- because it is not a conspiracy it is geopolitics- and that has been around since the begining of time.

        CORONAVIRUSResearcher Suggests Deliberate Chinese Propaganda Campaign Forced World Into Lockdown

        https://summit.news/2020/09/28/researcher-suggests-deliberate-chinese-propaganda-campaign-forced-world-into-lockdown/

        Reply
        1. Cian

          Firstly, if there is a second wave it will the first time in history so let’s knock that one on the head.

          Hmm.. its also the first time in history that the entire world has locked down (to a greater or lessor extent)

          Perhaps second wave is the wrong term. How about second year. We will be entering the flu season soon, and probably the covid season too. So the numbers for year 2 will rocket.

          Reply
      2. Vanessanelle

        Then you only need the daily ticktock from the ICUs Nidgie

        telling us about a cluster in a town a week after it festered is no good to anyone

        like you said – if Covid 19 patients being transferred into ICU beds, likewise with Covid 19 deaths, start to rise you’ll now this second wave is something that needs to be dealt with
        and the only way Ireland knows how to deal with it is to lockdown
        except for the Airports
        And meat factories

        Reply
        1. Nigel

          It is if you want to now how it’s spreading through the population. Why would you not want to know how and whether it’s spreading through the population? Or rather, if you don’t want to know fine, but why should other people who do want to keep an eye on its spread through the population, not do so? I’s rare to see anyone arguing that ignorance is bliss, but here we are.

          Reply
          1. Vanessanelle

            Shur we’ ve known how this thing spreads
            Since January

            And we know how to prevent the spread

            what has changed?
            the definition of soap and water?
            new guidelines on how to sneeze into your elbow?
            How not to shake hands?

            well?

          2. Nigel

            What has changed is the degree to which it is or is not currently spreading through the population i do not understand what is difficult about this concept.

          3. george

            What has changed is restaurants in Dublin and Donegal are closed and people have been told not to travel outside those counties. This is to prevent the cases rising to an unmanageable number and people have a right to know why and they are being informed. By the time the ICU beds are filling up it will be too late.

            “We’ve known since January” is nonsense.

      1. Nigel

        Here was me thinking I was being kept informed about a virus that swept the globe and caused international lockdowns, but apparently I am ‘feeding off it’ rather than keeping an eye on it so i can be aware of what’s going on.

        Reply
        1. SOQ

          You don’t get it Nigel- this relentless scare mongering is frightening people, especially older people. Others have posted about how the whole thing is affecting their parent’s mental health and that is mainly because of the likes of RTE and the Irish Times.

          Reply
          1. Nigel

            But it is a scary disease, especially for older people and people with underlying conditions and if this information was being deliberately kept from them to keep them from being scared you would be up the walls over the censorship and supression of information!

          2. Junkface

            Well in fairness, what is driving a lot of people’s older parents crazy is the lack of normal social activity, more than letting the TV terrify them with reports. They want to do the things they were enjoying in their retirement, they want to visit family and friends, they want to hug their grandchildren and spend the day with them.

            Also, as my parents are both in their early 70’s this virus is scary to them. Especially with underlying health conditions.

      2. Vanessanelle

        Shur yis won’t stop talking about it

        numbers of this
        stats from there
        reports from this crowd
        videos, virals, visors and vaccines
        doing it with the mask on
        Disprin cures it, 5g causes it

        c’mon
        it’s been non-stop info wars

        Reply
    2. george

      Yes, I’ll listen to NPHET, thanks. If information about the spread of the virus was being withheld there would be outrage whenever restrictions were brought it.

      Reply
  4. f_lawless

    UK Pathologist, Dr. Clare Craig has been speculating about the same phenomenon observed in the UK.

    (Sept 9th) https://twitter.com/ClareCraigPath/status/1303644275423547393

    “If universities like UEA are testing all students at the beginning of term, then 20-29 yr olds will be over represented in the results because of false positives.

    ..Equally, children and young people mixing at schools and universities will catch colds and get symptoms. Naturally they will then get themselves tested. We need to know what proportion of people tested were young before accusing them of causing an outbreak.”

    (26th Sep) https://twitter.com/i/status/1309869264455827456
    “Testing has been disproportionately carried out on the young. If you look at % +ves, 50-59 yr olds have a similar rate: 10th-16th Sept % testing +ve. Data here:..”

    Could the rise in proportion of positive test results among the young be because more of them are getting tested around this time of year?

    Reply
    1. Vanessanelle

      Course tis

      If a pop up test centre opens up in Mount Anville tomorrow
      will you be surprised by the news that there’s a massive rise in Teenage Girls in South Dublin testing positive on Wednesday?

      Reply
  5. White Dove

    Can someone please publish the death rates generally for each age group March-Sept so we can compare them to previous years? It would be a lot more helpful than just COVID deaths.

    Any flu stats? With all this social distancing, I haven’t had a cold since January. If less people are dying from flu, and more from COVID, does this balance things out?

    Reply
    1. george

      The first death in Covid-19 in Ireland was in March so that’s after the main part of the 2019/20 flu season and the 2020/21 one hasn’t started yet.

      Reply
  6. Ben

    Surely the numbers are related to the schools reopening especially around the teens numbers? I know there is a need to keep the schools open but there seems t be little discussion around this.

    Reply

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