43 thoughts on “Saturday’s Papers

  1. Charger Salmons

    CHARGER’S JAB JIBBER-JABBER™
    (An occasional series)

    Or Goodbye and thanks for all the vaxx baby

    I have a limitless loathing for the curtain-haired EU slimeball Guy Verhofstadt because of his attempts to overturn the UK’s Brexit referendum.

    But I take my hat off to him for the effort he has taken to go through both the EU and UK AstraZeneca contracts line by line and he’s come up with some remarkable findings.

    He notes that “ the EU has paid €336 million upfront to support production, before the products existed and had been authorized. The UK however only pays on invoice 30 days after delivery.
    So in effect the EU has helped pre-fund the production of vaccines that the UK only has to pay for afterwards. “

    More importantly, where the UK has foreseen possible problems six months in advance and written them into their contract there are gaping holes in the EU negotiated deal. These include timing, supply and delivery and pricing.

    Moreover,” the UK contract is fully concentrated on the UK supply chain, so as to guarantee the UK deliveries, while the EU contracts are solely focused on the overall supply chain, without special emphasis on the fulfilment of the EU-wide demand for doses.”

    It’s a short document but well worth a read as it blows holes in the EU’s catastrophically inept vaccine procurement programme.

    You can see why the Wiseguy shafted Leyen Low.

    You also won’t see it covered anywhere in the Irish media.

    https://guyverhofstadt.medium.com/two-contracts-lots-of-questions-and-not-nearly-enough-vaccines-cf1c2380cf29

    Reply
    1. Kim Cardassian

      Toodle pips Charger! No vax facts today though? :(

      Charger random facts #1

      Charger Salmon is an anagram of Charles Morgan. A fascinated unsolved crime case from Arizona in the 70’s. Officially suicide but clearly not!

      Charger random facts #2
      Charger Salmon’s anagram namesake, Charles Morgan was also a British playwright in the early 1900’s. He once said, “One cannot shut one’s eyes to things not seen with eyes”

      Reply
      1. Charger Salmons

        Thanks for your concern but I retired the nightly Charger’s Vax Facts™ in favour of just the occasional outing as it was clearly causing so much pain and angst on here.
        You know, facts like it was only on December 8th that the very first UK ( and world ) vaccine was administered.
        Two months later a quarter of the nation has received its first jab. Amazing progress.

        Reply
    2. Charger Salmons

      I’ll tell you another man who gets my goat and that’s Steve Coogan.
      But I’ll forgive him everything, even his boring travel series on Greece with Rob Brydon, after watching Stan & Ollie on the Beeb last night.
      Him and John C.Reilly are genius even with a poor script.

      Reply
        1. Cú Chulainn

          Those psycho gulls get all the attention.. but no more. I’m a hands on supporter of the Beaver. I’m right behind the beaver and am looking forward to episodes of repeated beaver mayhem.

          Reply
    1. V aka Frilly Keane

      So “the pandemic is not over until all people in the world have been vaccinated” makes Angela Merkel a demented maniac

      And all the lads saying the same thing are …. wha?
      Like Mike Ryan for example

      Reply
      1. bisted

        …I see Cuba have joined Russia and China in the rollout of vaccines to third World countries…besides constant demonisation by the West, I wonder what else these countries have in common…certainly can’t be altruism…

        Reply
        1. V aka Frilly Keane

          Well, not to get to tied into weekend @Broadsheet argy bargy

          But one of the activities not forbidden under the various Cuban Embargoes
          Is medical and scientific research
          That they worked on with Russia yes mainly, but also with other countries and with big pharma

          But with Russia alone, there were many exchange agreements between them – pre- glasnost mainly

          Also Russian Scientists and Medical Research and Breakthroughs were very much in their own hands for most of the last century
          They had to find their own answers and treatments for all sorts of diseases and what-have-yas

          The most relevant example being Stem Cell Replacement Therapy, and we have our very own witness, Stephen Garland

          In other words folks
          I wouldn’t be so quick to diss any Russian/ Cuban Covid response
          Just saying

          Reply
        2. Bitnboxy

          Funny how Putin is already mass exporting his Sputnik vaccine to third and developing nations. Only thing is though, Russians haven’t seen sight nor sound of it and at this rate Sputnik is far more available to citizen’s of countries outside Russia than to ordinary Russians themselves. Still, I’ll bet the thugs and kleptos in Putin’s circle will managed to get vaccinated- wonder if it’ll be Sputnik though?

          We should wonder though why Russia is offering theoretically millions and millions of doses while not sufficiently progressing in vaccinating their own people, whatsoever. Ireland per head of population has vaccinated more.

          Reply
          1. ce

            Because they’ll face vaccine resistance at home and frankly in Russia could do with a lower population, or fear of cover keeps protest lower?

            …. In any event who knows – I’d take it in the morning. Russian science since the early 20th century has been consistently sniffed at outside, jealousy about what they can accomplish with less resources for the most part. Don’t want their politics or geopolitical outlook, but their research in all disciplines is incredible.

      2. f_lawless

        There’s just no place for naturally acquired immunity in this brave new world being manufactured around us. Citizens, it matters not that for the majority, the virus is known to cause only mild symptoms to none at all, it matters not whether you may have already developed an immune response to the virus naturally, every single one of you – man, woman, and child – must take the experimental vaccines before we declare the pandemic over. The body’s own immune defense system is something we must in time, learn to look at it with scorn, better yet cast it from our minds entirely.

        What’s that you say “the more we vaccinate, the more it will induce mutations of the virus resistant to the vaccines”, (as confirmed by UK Vaccine Deployment MP Nadhim Zahawi https://twitter.com/jengleruk/status/1358353911002902530) ? Don’t think twice citizens, we have each and every one of you covered: with every dangerous new mutation of the virus induced by the vaccines, we will have a new variant of the experimental vaccines put into production, .the future is glorious! ;)

        Reply
  2. Charger Salmons

    I look back with some amusement at the dunderheads on here who gleefully reckoned the Pound was doomed because of Brexit.
    Sterling ended the week above $1.40 and €1.15.
    But I’m not sure UK economic policy makers will want the Pound to strengthen much further.

    Reply
    1. GiggidyGoo

      How does one define strength of a currency? Is strength of a currency equivalent to strength of an economy?
      Bear in mind that GB exports are already suffering because of Brexit, meaning higher prices for goods bought from GB, that the ‘stronger’ the pound means that GB goods have gotten more expensive they again, which will have the knock-on effect of less purchasing of GB goods by EU, and US. Less purchasing of GB products will result in more job losses in GB.

      Reply
      1. Charger Salmons

        That’s the whole point.
        Strengths and weaknesses of a currency have plus and minus points.
        But the idea that it will only ever go one way – as the economic boneheads on here at the time predicted – is nonsense.
        As I mentioned upthread I doubt whether Dishi Rishi will want sterling much higher but as a currency it’s still very attractive.
        I horsed a lot of euros into it at the end of 2020 as soon as the EU deal was announced.
        Easy moolah.

        Reply
      2. Charger Salmons

        But it is rather sweet when inhabitants of the 29th richest country in the world with a GDP of 388 billion worry their silly little heads over the 5th biggest economy in the world with a GDP of 2.6 trillion.
        Almost cute in its own fluffy kittens sort of way …

        Reply
  3. Charger Salmons

    The Irish judicial system works in bizarre ways.
    According to the Irish Times leading Dublin criminal solicitor Cahir O’Higgins (46), whose practice Cahir O’Higgins & Company Solicitors is based at Dublin’s Parkgate Street, was arrested at 3.46am(!) yesterday.
    He was cautioned and charged just over 10 minutes later with assault causing harm to another solicitor.
    Yet he was held overnight in cells before appearing in a court on a Saturday where there were no objections to bail.
    The case was adjourned for seven weeks.
    What was the point of all this rigmarole ?
    Was all this necessary when the incident happened way back on February 11th ?
    If the 3.46am time is correct why choose this bizarre time ?
    Why hold a special court sitting on a Saturday ?
    Or am I missing something obvious ?

    Reply
  4. Birdie

    Wow that Stephen Downey is some creep. 4 years reduced to 2!!!! That poor woman terrorised for years and he gets 2 years off his sentence, not good enough.

    Reply
  5. Birdie

    Donnelly and this amateur hour government boil my pee but come on! Throwing stuff at his house and stressing out his family is just a joke. If you’re as annoyed as I am just don’t vote him back in or those parties that irk you, you don’t have to bully the man and his family. It’s not on and I hope they go after the idiots that think it’s okay to do that. I can only imagine how scary it is for his kids and wife.

    Reply

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