48 thoughts on “Wednesday’s Papers

    1. Cú Chulainn

      To the Gull… I see The Star have taken to including a Seagull on its masthead… so glad to see that there are people who haven’t lost their sense of humour..

      Reply
  1. ian-Oh

    Well that was a rather pointlesss address to the nation.

    Mehole Martian is about as inspiring as a constipation ad.

    We. Are. F****d.

    Most of us will not see a vaccine this year, most likely summer 2022 if even.

    I might as well try and catch it at this stage, with these timescales before vaccination and the more infectious strains its only a matter of time before I get it going to the supermarket or hospital (which I need to at least once a month.)

    Reply
    1. Cú Chulainn

      It looks like they are either so far out of their depth or they have just given up. No contact or track and trace. Still no quarantine at the airport or ports. Launching a come visit Ireland tourism campaign.. pay rises for themselves and civil service at a time when the sme’s are about to go bust in huge numbers.. every decision is the worst decision. They have lost the goodwill of the country.

      Reply
      1. V aka Frilly Keane

        I don’t think its either Cú – that they’ve given up or that they haven’t a clue

        It that they couldn’t give ‘ah …bulls motion stuff
        They know they will never be held accountable for anything
        any of it, ever
        nor will the crowd that come after them
        ’cause they’ll do the same thing
        seal up, cover up, make up excuses and jobs and new pay rises,
        then PR the crap out of every awkward spot

        How hard could it be to quarantine off Airports and points of entry – only for commercial cargo kinda thing
        or track and trace – like they were great at the videos of the Army and their call centres last year

        Just those two initiatives – a stroke of a pen at cabinet, and mobilising entry level work force and renting some office space

        now you know why a 630 mill hospital to be Completed in 2020
        is tipping 3 billion and looking at 2025 before a ribbon can be cut
        or why a senior Minister needs 9 Advisors

        Now you know why RTÉ will get their 150m top up
        with circa 20m pa being settled on them as a subsidy
        for saying nice things about the Government and their plus 1s

        It’s never going to change
        Unless they change
        and I can’t see that ever happening

        Reply
        1. Junkface

          Irish leadership is in a bad way. What we have is a collection of PR stunts in human form. They are career politicians, serving the public effectively is somewhere at the bottom of their list of priorities.
          …and to push through another round of salary increases during a pandemic, when thousands are unemployed, is so tone deaf, but they don’t care. There are no repercussions.

          Reply
          1. Junkface

            And a housing/property market riddled with vulture funds, when many other countries or cities have shown them the door. They should be at a minimum in a major city’s housing market, otherwise it leads to the extortionate disaster we have in Ireland.

          2. Micko

            No repercussions indeed JF

            The government can effectively do whatever they want now.

            Through constant fear mongering on RTÉ and other media they have terrified most of the population and provided others with a financial and lifestyle incentive to not rock the boat.

            And when somebody does try to open up their business (as we saw yesterday) to pay their rent and provide for their family, not only do the government send in the Guards to shut them down in the name of safety, the general public actually cheers them on for doing so!

            Incredible.

        2. Otis Blue

          Accountability is the key and we don’t have it. Neither in Government nor within the opposition. Nowhere near.

          And that reflects a deliberate policy but also the culture which spawns and elects these hoors. Deny everything, close rank, brazen it out but keep the till open. And when you’re bought, stay bought.

          We pay handsomely for this dross and there’s next to no prospect of that changing anytime soon.

          Reply
    2. Kate

      We are fed up but you stay positive. I see vitamin D is highly recommended so give it a try for a bit of extra protection .

      Reply
      1. Charger Salmons

        Wise words as ever Kate – you’re a beacon of sensibility on here.
        I’ve been taking 4000iu of D3 daily since the start of the pandemic along with Zinc supplements to boost the immune system as well as my regular multi-vit and glucosamine for my dodgy runner’s knee.
        And plenty of beauty sleep of course.
        Who knows what difference it all makes but might as well give the body a fighting chance.
        I imagine you take good care of yourself too …

        Reply
      2. ian-Oh

        I’ve been taking vitamin d for years.

        I credit it for being partially responsible for me not ever feeling down when winter comes along, it likely does help with other stuff too like immunity.

        However, its hard to remain upbeat watching the clusterfupp that is Martin & Donnelly. I’ve been generally OK through the pandemic even with health issues (only orthopaedic but quite a nuisance all the same) but starting to falter. My brother who lives in Glasgow got very clear and concise information from the NHS about the likeliest timeframe for his vaccine, we get “we’ll let you know….sometime.”

        Reply
        1. Kate

          The amount of “poor” workers -those earning less than 60% of the median salary -will increase from 27% -before the crisis -to 36.5% after lock down. We have endured longest lockdown with 163 days of workplaces closed.
          Ireland 163 days.
          France 84 days.
          Germany 34 days.
          Latvia 31 days.
          U.K. 104 days.
          Spain 53 days.

          Reply
        2. Charger Salmons

          @ian-Oh
          Chin up old sport – only another few months to go and this time next year we’ll be wondering what all the fuss is about.
          A good walk with the dogs in the fresh air and a late afternoon snifter or two in the man cave keeps me on a daily even keel.
          Keep thinking positive thoughts.
          Marvellous.

          Reply
  2. Shayna

    Has anyone considered the cut daffodil, not yet in bloom? Generally on sale, this time of year for a quid/euro at Tesco et les restes, not so prolific?. Hundreds of acres of Daffodils are dying in the fields of Cornwall (England), no-one to pick them (Eastern European types have gone home), then (not) send them (Brexit-Irish Sea Border) to Ireland. It’s an altogether 3rd World complaint, for sure. Except it’s not! Agriculture is a fundamental for humankind – a guy growing daffodil fields, can’t sell – next year – no daffodils. The difficulty of Brexit is being felt currently at the top bit of Ireland, who majorly voted to Remain. The Pandemic is a distraction for the woeful execution of whatever Article in The EU Constitution – No Irish Sea Border – No Hard Border, that’s a real thing. Interestingly, the NI media refer to GB presently. Somehow, indirectly, will we be a nation once again? We’ll hate/love/forgive. Eireann Abu! Also daffodils are freely available south of the non-existant border.

    Reply
    1. Otis Blue

      Was wondering about this recently. They’ve been grown commercially on farms local enough to me in Cork for the last 25 years. Unlike previous years, they don’t appear to be available in the shops as usual. No idea why.

      It’s a pity because they are one of the joys at this time of year.

      Reply
  3. Charger Salmons

    The latest UK opinion poll, carried out before Boris’s Long Road To Freedom was published, gives him a healthy six point lead over Labour as Blighty gives the Tory Toff the thumbs up for his deft handling of the vaccine rollout.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/BritainElects/status/1364280810900250633

    Meanwhile I hope you all horsed into EasyJet when I told you to last week.
    They were among a suite of UK travel stocks that surged yesterday as summer sun bookings by Brits cheered on by Boris’s message of hope soared by up to 600%.
    Kerching baby !
    Marvellous.

    Reply
    1. Shayna

      It’s kinda obvious to everyone that lock-down works. The problem is that economies grind to a halt, without industry – also, people have been suffering from Cabin Fever. I think the Brits, i.e Boris Johnson is jumping the gun by naming potential dates for relaxing their lock-down, based on vaccinations. The North of Ireland is, to be fair, erring on the side of caution.

      Reply
  4. Redundant Proofreaders Society

    Leo Varadkar was on Morning Ireland blaming both the B117 variant and the back door from Belfast. He also said ‘what is the point in imposing quarantine on people arriving from countries with low levels of the virus?’.
    Failing to acknowledge that travel hubs are ideal spots for transmission.

    Worth transcribing, Broadsheet.

    Reply
    1. GiggidyGoo

      Varadkar’s Penny-farthing worth. He doesn’t care what he says as long as he gets his slot in the media. Has he been interviewed yet by Garda Harris’s lot?

      Reply
    2. Junkface

      How Leo Varadkar made it as far as he did is a sad reflection on how poor new leadership candidates are in Ireland. Jesus Christ, he is a waffler and an empty suit.

      Reply
      1. ian-oh

        Colloquial Irish. Can also be seen in the word ‘yizzer’ as in ‘yizzer are all a bunch of spanners’.

        Bit like how Brummys say ‘yow’ I suppose?

        Reply
        1. Charger Salmons

          Oh I know what it means.
          I’m just surprised someone actually writes the word down as though they’re speaking it.
          Well, I say surprised …

          Reply
          1. ian-oh

            I love regional accents, worked with a guy from England, somewhere close to Yorkshire (but not actually Yorkshire) and almost everything he said had a ‘t’ attached where it worked and sometimes a K sound instead of a G. He’d also over pronounced the last letter in a lot of word, so shop would become ‘shopppp’ with the extra P’s pronounced.

            So he’d be like ‘Am just goinK downt ta shoppp…..’

          2. Charlie

            Likewise. Can’t even fathom where that dialect was born. I can usually cut through any English speaking dialect and work it out but I watched a movie very recently ‘Judas and the Black Messiah’ and really struggled to understand that ghetto Chicago language. Great movie but needs to be subtitled.

      2. Redundant Proofreaders Society

        ‘Yiz’ is a Hibernian-English version of ‘yez’, which is a valid word of colloquial origin in the Oxford English Dictionary. ‘Yizzer’ is a Dublin variant.

        Yez (PRONOUN)
        non-standard spelling of youse, used in representing dialectal speech
        ‘don’t any of yez dare sneeze’

        It’s a great word as it solves the confusing double meaning of you (singular) and you (plural). It’s more modern than quaint.

        Reply
  5. Crocodile Dundalk

    Charlie upset that Varadkar is getting called out yet again.

    You and Bin+poxy’ pro lockdown drivel is starting to sound eerily familiar.

    Reply
  6. Charger Salmons

    “The mighty pound is rising like a phoenix”
    The pound has extended its longest winning streak in five-and-a-half years, rising for a ninth straight day, after the Telegraph reported the UK’s exit from lockdown could be accelerated if data on the effect of vaccines prove better than expected. That’s adding to optimism that the UK will bounce back faster than its European peers.
    http://www.irishtimes.com/business/markets/sterling-s-vaccine-fuelled-rally-starts-to-look-relentless-1.4493839

    We’re back Baby.

    Reply

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