Still Stuck On This?

at | 91 Replies

“Republican house members had invited Sherri Tenpenny to testify in support of a bill that would weaken our state’s vaccination laws. She is a licensed doctor who is carving out quite the career for herself defying science and spreading lies about Covid-19 vaccines.

“I’m sure you’ve seen the pictures all over the internet of people who have had these shots and now they’re magnetized,” she said, out loud. “You can put a key on their forehead, it sticks. You can put spoons and forks all over and they can stick because now we think there is a metal piece to that.”

Hours later, there’s CNN’s Jake Tapper, smacking that pen to his brow.

“Nope,” he said as the pen tumbled onto his desk. “Not magnetic.”

Magnets, vaccines and the toll the conspiracy of misinformation takes on our ability to protect ourselves (Connie Schulz, USA Today)

Alternatively….

Gulp.

Dr T offers an alternative, less light-hearted hypothesis.

Yesterday: El Trabajo Del Diablo

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91 thoughts on “Still Stuck On This?

    1. U N M U T U A L

      Bodger, bringing balance to the force or rogue one…?

      I find your lack of faith disturbing.;-)

      Reply
    1. Cian

      1) do the Covid vaccines use SPIONs?
      2) even if they did, how many “superparamagnetic nanoparticles” would you need to make your arm magnetic?

      Reply
  1. Joe

    There are no two sides to the argument.
    Anyone who imagines otherwise refuses to accept basic science.
    It’s akin to claiming there are two sides to the shape of the Earth, the scientific side long ago proved it’s a sphere the unscientific fools claim it’s flat.

    Reply
    1. K. Cavan

      You really haven’t the foggiest about how science operates, Joe, do you? You seem to think the Media are all “science experts”. Ever hear of Galileo? Outside of Freddie Mercury singing his name, that is.

      Reply
  2. frank

    Both me and the wife got Pfizer jabs on the 29th of May. I’ve had Covid etc. but I was offered the shot and really I don’t care one way or the other so I accepted it so I could just say I’m fully vaccinated lets get on with everything.
    I done this magnet thing with a neodymium magnet and sorry about you folks you can dismiss it all you like but it does work. It flips the magnet and indeed you can feel it pull inside your arm. In saying that it will not work on the wifes arm??? Some honesty is needed here rather than… this is a pile of rubbish

    Reply
      1. frank

        I was amazed and kind of concerned initially but I feel fine.
        It still works nearly 2 weeks later??
        When I Googled it there is just ‘official news sources’ rubbishing the claims which again is concerning!!

        I hope it it energises my animal magnetism and all the laydeez beat a path to my door (when the wife is out of course)

        Reply
      2. Bodger

        frank, I’ve been pushing this story on here quite hard as I’ve seen hundreds of videos of obviously genuine people like you experiencing the same thing and been told they are making it up.

        Reply
        1. frank

          no it’s not just at the injection site. I can get the magnet to pull and flip on the inside of my elbow (where the large veins are) It works best when I draw the magnet in the same direction for a couple of passes the way you’d magnetise a needle etc. then one pole (but not the other??) of a small neodymium magnet will pull or filp or indeed stick. It’s quite weak and not a really powerful attraction.
          It doesn’t work on my right arm???

          I suppose the only thing I don’t know is… perhaps this worked before the jab as I never tried it before??????

          Reply
          1. K. Cavan

            You must be wrong, Frank, otherwise several of those posting here are talking through their bottomhats & have been for some time.

          1. Kdoc

            Haha. The key didn’t manage to stick to her neck, but did to her chest i.e. it stuck to where her skin was oily, as you might expect.

    1. Micko

      Holy crap!

      This is mental! An actual BS’er experiencing this.

      Honestly, I had dismissed this as total rubbish, but Frank has been solid over the last while , so I believe him.

      WTF is going on – how can this be possible?

      Reply
          1. SOQ

            You are a spin merchant- touting the government line at every available opportunity- anyone who has spent any time on this site knows it.

      1. Frank

        micko I was shocked it worked myself. I did it for the hell of it watching telly late one night. I was so shocked I nearly went up stairs to tell her. she would have kill me!!

        as I’ve said perhaps I was already ‘magnetised’ but if that’s the case why doesn’t a credible news source just say ‘some people are more magnetised than others’ rather than the ‘these people are lunatics’. also neodymium magenta are super powerful so perhaps people are getting results because of their strength.
        don’t know!

        Reply
    2. Kdoc

      Frank, it’s a great pity that you didn’t try the neodymium magnet before you got the jab and then after receiving the jab; that test would have been a great scientific comparative analysis. In your case I suspect adherence would have occurred in both circumstances.

      Reply
      1. Frank

        Kdoc it’s not just the magnet sticking. it will flip or turn obviously being repelled on the same pole. I can also feel it pull both inside my arm and between my fingers. it’s really slight but it can be seen.

        perhaps some people are just more magnetised than others! and perhaps I could have experienced thus effect if I tried previous to the vaccine. I’d encourage the non jabbed to try the experiment prior to vaccination and then post vaccination. that would be a good experiment.

        I’ll try to record it but it’s not easy to set up the camera stoke my arm with a magnet get the dinner on bring the dog for a walk tell the child to stop hitting the other child and also convince the wife this experiment is for science.

        Reply
        1. Kdoc

          I think it might have something to do with skin rather than magnetism. Interestingly, it didn’t work in your wife’s case. In the link sent by asitsaysinthepapers it worked on the lady’s chest, but not on her neck. Some people have oily skin that may help items to stick, others less so. Further, some people have dry skin in places and oily skin in other places. That seems to be the case with the lady in the link. The simple experiment mentioned would resolve the issue, but there may be other variables at play.

          Reply
        2. Steph Pinker

          Frank, I have never been able to wear a watch because they slow down or stop; I have bought cheap watches, I’ve been given expensive watches and I only have one left for prosperity but there’s no point in wearing it – we all have magnetic forces within us coupled with the kinetic energy we naturally produce.

          Reply
          1. Cian

            “the kinetic energy we naturally produce”

            Hahaha

            That is brilliant. Technically its the truth (as in we move) but sounds so profound.

  3. millie bobby brownie

    I honestly don’t think I can take anything this site Bodger publishes seriously anymore.

    You’re making the National Enquirer look like a credible news outlet these days. Yeeesh.

    Reply
      1. SOQ

        Is it that you don’t think this is a thing or that you don’t think it should be given coverage?

        Personally I think it is a thing- just like the messed up menstrual cycles. Anyone with a scientific mind should be at least curious as to what is going on- in both cases.

        Reply
        1. millie bobby brownie

          Personally, I don’t believe it is a thing.

          That said, if provided with a compelling enough argument or proof I could well change my mind. But so far, no, nothing I’ve seen so far has convinced me that this is anything other than an Internet urban legend kind of thing.

          Reply
          1. SOQ

            Well there is already one person on here who claims it- and the numbers on tik tok are one almighty conspiracy if not true. It is possible to be some sort of chemical reaction I suppose but shouldn’t be dismissed out of hand because we are into new territory. If it is true and Pharma cannot explain it, we have big problems.

            How would something like this interact with EMF for example?

            I am way more interested in the menstrual cycles thing myself because I very much doubt so many women would be willing to put their faces on social media and therefore make identities known with such a private matter, if they weren’t concerned.

          2. Daisy Chainsaw

            Of course we’re going to believe some anon poster on a pro conspiracy site who appears to have 2 different logins!

          3. Steph Pinker

            Cian! You’re a FG civil servant and admittedly so, yet you state that no one on the internet lies?

            Even Varadkar is bolshie in his denial of lying.

          4. Steph Pinker

            Daisy; male or female – don’t we all come from the same place?

            P.S. Leave it with me.

          5. Cian

            You’re a FG civil servant and admittedly so,
            I’ve voted for FG. I’m not associated with FG (or any party) in any other way.
            I’m not, and never have been, a civil servant (and never would have said I was).

          6. Cian

            Nope. Private sector.

            I have, in the past, worked with both public and civil service (and other private sector too).

  4. Micko

    Frank seems like a solid dude to me. So I believe him.

    But I cannot for the life of me understand how such a thing would be possible.

    Reply
    1. Oro

      It’s not possible. Where’d you get your science degree? I’ll warn anyone away I hear of going there.

      Reply
      1. Micko

        Heh…

        Without getting too specific, its a well known Dub college that has a C a U and a D in its name. ;)

        But, I think Frank has no reason to lie.

        Empiricist vs rationalist? He could send Bodger a vid?

        Reply
          1. Micko

            It’s alright GP. Let them ;)

            Anyone who’s an actual interest in science would be intrigued whether this phenomenon is observable and repeatable.

            As I said, I initially dismissed this as rubbish, a trick online, but after speaking to Frank for over a year now and finding him to be a good bloke. My interest is piqued.

            Only zealots dismiss things out of hand.

            Any real scientist would be interested in what’s actually going on- regardless of the outcome.

            No matter if it’s real or fake – I’ll be happy to know the truth.

          1. Steph Pinker

            Micko comes across as having a southside accent by the way he writes and pronounces his words on d’internet, so I wouldn’t bet my £750,0000 one bed communal bedsit on it – but I could be wrong.

            :)

          2. Hyper real

            Yes a working class Southsider from
            Ballybrack trying to ape his masters but failing

      1. scottser

        Its all gone downhill since Charger left. All we need is a common enemy, otherwise we turn on each other..

        Reply
        1. Steph Pinker

          I miss Charger. There’s something very sexy about a man who has intelligence, wit, imagination and a stiff upper lip which can hold a willy suspension of disbelief.

          Reply
          1. Hyper real

            We know what you mean.
            I feel the same about horsey types with their own Landrovers

  5. Lilly

    I’m willing to take the magnet test before I get the jab. Will report back. What kind of magnet should I use? I presume a fridge magnet won’t suffice.

    Reply
    1. Cian

      On YouTube and Twitter people are saying that keys stick to their arm… suggesting that the vaccine causes magnetism- so no other magnet is needed.

      Which is funny as none of the (small) sample of keys I have enough iron for a magnet to stick to.

      Reply
    2. Kdoc

      Great, lets move away from the ‘alligators in the sewers’ thinking and move to scientific analysis,
      Following Frank’s experience the hypothesis should be as follows:
      Hypothesis: That having received the Covid vaccination the recipient will have magnetic features at the vaccination site and/or some other part of their anatomy.
      Method: Two treatments will be employed.
      Treatment 1) The subject to be vaccinated will test his/her magnetic properties prior to being vaccinated using a door key or similar instrument.
      Treatment 2) After receiving the vaccination the subject will again test his/her magnetic properties by using the same instrument employed in treatment 1.
      Analysis: The result will be studiously examined by the usual expert panels on Broadsheet.
      Discussion: The said panel should be wholly convinced that there were no confounding variables that contaminated the experiment.
      Results: The scientific outcome should be presented to the public via Broadsheet.
      Further Research: To convince all and sundry the experiment should be replicated by other Broadsheet readers.
      (Don’t be shocked if the Null Hypothesis is true.)

      Reply
      1. ce

        Ww also need a control group made up of Journal.ie comment section participants… but they can’t know they are the control group…

        Reply
    1. Kdoc

      That link supports my original belief i.e. skin type / skin condition at the time of testing is the driver of the so-called magnetism.

      Reply
    2. f_lawless

      Just to play Devil”s advocate again here though, is it a such beautiful example of science working when the the start of the experiment has been cut from the video? Ca we be sure he’s on the level? We’ve no way to judge the way in which he got the magnet to stick to his arm in the first place. In many videos I’ve seen, the magnet is seen to run smoothly along the skin with a finger underneath holding its weight until an exact point on the arm is reached. Sometimes it’s even seen to flip over or wobble.No pressing down on the magnet was involved to get it to stick.

      Surely you wouldn’t say the above video is more compelling than various random people being approached in a London park and given the opportunity to try it for themselves?

      If we overlook the fact the beginning of the video is missing and assume the guy in the video is behaving genuinely, we could say that theoretically a certain amount people may be mistaking a magnetic effect for oily skin but aside from that it’s already known the effect appears to happen for some and not others.

      Over to you!

      Reply
      1. Cian

        Explain the “science” then.
        The raw vaccine isn’t magnetic (not will a magnet stick to it).
        The human body isn’t magnetic (not will a magnet stick to it).
        What scientifically, will allow you to combine two things that aren’t magnetic so the result becomes magnetic?

        Reply
  6. Steph Pinker

    If you have a strong smell of silage off your steph, it’s probably a a throat or skin infection, or it could be scabies.

    Luv ya :)

    Btw, check this monster out until the penicillin kicks in:

    The link won’t post, nonetheless, use a search engine of your choice to search Avtoros Shaman 8×8 All-Terrain vehicle – you’ll want to marry me, милый…

    Reply

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