Podge & Rodge and Doireann Garrihy

On The Ray D’Arcy Show

Fergus McCormack writes:

The return of the mischievous Podge & Rodge to Irish TV after an eight year hiatus is highly anticipated and the irreverent duo join Ray to introduce their new co-host, Doireann Garrihy.

World solo sailor Gregor McGuckin arrived home to a hero’s welcome this week, joins us to tell us about his journey, which ended when he lost both of his masts during a violent southern ocean storm.

Nine-year-old Lucy Harrington is one of Ireland’s youngest award-winning sheep farmers and she joins Ray with her All-Ireland champion lambs and prize-winning hoggets.

Political stalwarts and former ministers Mary O’Rourke, Gemma Hussey and Niamh Bhreathnach join Ray to talk about claims of sexism in the Dáil

And 91-year-old Holocaust survivor Dr. Edith Eger joins Ray to talk about how she learnt how to ‘find joy within’ after the horror of Auschwit

There’ll be music from Maria Byrne, with her stirring take of the Genesis classic, Follow You, Follow Me…

The Ray D’Arcy Show at 9.55pm on RTÉ One.

Pic: RTÉ

Taiwan’s recently opened National Kaohsiung Centre For The Arts, Weiwuying – a vast performing arts venue (the world’s largest by far) covering 35 acres of a 116 acre park in the southern port city of Kaohsiung.

The undulating structure, built by Dutch engineering firm Mecanoo and inspired by the undulating canopy of local banyan trees, incorporates a 2,236-seat opera house, a 1,981-seat concert hall, a 1,210-seat playhouse, a 434-seat recital hall, and an outdoor theatre built into the sloping roof.

designboom

From top: Terry McMahon’s impending African thriller Caged in the Creeks; article in The Guardian (Nigeria) newspaper.

Terry McMahon writes:

Even though I stopped writing for Broadsheet because of poisonous psychos hiding behind pseudonyms, I see that a recent powerful post detailing a video about incredibly brave people fighting for rights to medicinal cannabis in Ireland is still somehow lassoed by another moronic troll as a means to insult me. With yet another lie.

But the facts don’t matter to trolls. Or the truth. They simply need to defecate. Everywhere. Poor souls.

The world is a big and beautiful place. Small-minded psychos shouldn’t be allowed to define its conversations. What Broadsheet does in Ireland is important. Writing for readers who care about something beyond a troll’s obsessive need for keyboard attacks is an honour.

So, to hell with the trolls.

The keyboard warriors. The anonymous cowards. The pseudonym psychos. No doubt they’re already frenziedly trashing out their rebuttals with their usual charm and chlamydia-infected fingertips.

But that’s enough about the troglodyte cowardice of Irish trolls. Africa is calling. Big, beautiful, brave Africa.

In Ireland, there seem to be select filmmakers who get offered movies no matter what they do. Some of them can even make back-to-back duds and still secure finance for their next film.

Then, there are the rest of us. People whose track record is also irrelevant. In a destructive way.

The last film I directed won multiple awards internationally, and three IFTAs at home, yet there wasn’t a single offer to direct another film from anyone in Ireland.

Not one.

And believe me, I wasn’t sitting on my arrogant arse, waiting for handouts, I reached out to everyone. Nothing. Nada. I couldn’t even secure an unpaid apprenticeship on the television show Vikings.

For my third film, I desperately wanted to make a passion project, ‘The Dancehall Bitch,’ a deeply provocative prison drama about the nature of coercion and sexual violence.

The two leading actors of my previous films, Emmett Scanlan and Moe Dunford were as equally passionate about the project as I was. There was a kind of poetry in these two previously unknown actors, who are now trailblazing their way across the world stage, joining each other for our third film together.

Also, in an era when the dangers of violent masculinity and the obscenity of coercive rape are two of the most contentious conversations in our culture, I also believed our timing couldn’t have been better.

These were two superb young Irish actors who completely trusted their Irish director – all of whom had now proven themselves on that international stage – and we were ready to make a provocative picture about the national narrative like this country had never seen.

What could possibly go wrong?

The Irish Film Board turned the project down.

The same happened with several other projects. Evidently, the kind of cinema I wanted to make was not the kind of cinema they wanted to make.

The political landscape had changed. Certain films were taboo now. Just like certain directors. Paying the mortgage became an increasingly difficult task.

I also had a new kid. Mouths to be fed. So, with twenty-five years of teaching experience, I applied to advertised positions in colleges.

At the risk of sounding immodest, I had taught in several of these colleges in the past, consistently generating remarkable testimonials from the pupils. It may not have been filmmaking but facilitating students in finding their voices can still be incredibly creative.

Then the penny dropped. I didn’t even make the shortlist for many of the interviews. Later it would be revealed that the positions had often gone to people significantly less qualified than me.

And that’s when you begin to get worried.

Five years after ‘Patrick’s Day‘ won the Galway Film Fleadh and The Cork Film Festival, every filmmaker who had made the big films in those festivals that year had gone on to make another film. Sometimes two.

Every filmmaker except the one who had won both festivals. In those five years, I had become increasingly involved in the politics of austerity and the sickening policies of our government. I had been asked to make some speeches. They caused serious backlash.

I broke some cultural rules that are not meant to be broken. Apollo House didn’t help either. Everyone is equal in this new era of equality. Except for the ones who can’t swallow the lie. I was out. Finito.

I would have killed to make my third film in Ireland. I adore our country. I adore Irish people. With a passion that’s almost embarrassing. Most of them, anyway. But telling the truth these days in Ireland is punishable by career death.

Yet, the Gods of Film are a gloriously fickle bunch. The audacity you are punished for in your own country can be the very thing that ignites the imagination of another.

And nowhere on earth embraces audacity more than Africa.

They don’t care that you took some small action against the government’s murderous austerity. They admire it. They don’t care that you want to use film to shake up the world. They insist upon it.

They don’t care that you’re a pink-skinned, black-listed Paddy who can’t keep his damned mouth shut. They love it.

The only thing our African brothers really care about is whether or not you’ll put everything on the line to make a movie. And that’s the only thing I care about too. Which is why I love those magnificent men and women right back. Almost as much as I love the trolls.

Terry McMahon is a filmmaker and can be found on Twitter @terrymcmahon69

Previously: Terry McMahon on Broadsheet

Yikes.

People are showing their support for Michael D. Higgins through nail art (Galen English, Evoke.ie)

Pics: Tropical Popical

Dublin Rental Investigator tweetz:

Bedshare for €280pm in Kimmage. That’s €280pm for half a double bed with a stranger. There is also another person in the room. Another has a room for themselves. You also have to pay €20 for bedlinen whether you need it or not.

193 Kimmage, Kimmage, Dublin 6w (Daft.ie)


A statement (above) released by DUP East Antrim MP Sammy Wilson (top) this morning.

It follows Taoiseach Leo Varadkar producing a 1972 copy of the Irish Times which included a picture of an IRA bomb attack on the Newry Customs Office, at a dinner with EU leaders in Brussels on Wednesday.

Nine people died and six people were injured in the attack on August 22.

Sammy Wilson hits out at ‘vile Varadkar’ over ‘despicable, low and rotten’ border violence claim (Belfast Telegraph)

Pics: News Letter and Sam McBride

Previously: Eagle Droppings

 

Presidential candidate Peter Casey

Previously: That Seemed To Go Well

From top: Denis Naughten (left) and David McCourt; Michael Noonan

Denis Naughten had at least two additional meetings with David McCourt during the procurement process for the National Broadband Plan (NBP), it has emerged.

The former communications minister’s diary shows that he and the Irish-American businessman met in October 2016, when three potential bidders remained in the running for the lucrative rural broadband contract. There are no minutes of the October meeting, which was also attended by officials.

Denis Naughten held further talks with businessman (The Times Ireland Edition)

Meanwhile…

Former Minister for Finance, Michael Noonan met with representatives of Enet, including former government Press Secretary and PR advisor Eoin O’Neachtain, in December 2016 – three months before Denis Naughten made the decision to extend the Municipal Area Networks (MANs) contracts to Enet ” suddenly and without tender”.

Social Democrats co-leader Catherine Murphy said:

“In a series of parliamentary replies to me, including a schedule showing all meetings between either David McCourt, representatives of Enet, and the Department of Communications, it is clear that there was almost an open door policy in Government buildings for Enet and/or David McCourt.

I have said previously that we need to understand the rationale for the former Minister’s decision to extend the MANs contract – which is essentially the precursor to the NBP process – when he did because soon after that contract extension the State bought into Enet at a cost of approximately €200 million and it is important to understand if that extension materially affected the price paid by the State for its 78% purchase of Enet in 2017.

To learn now that the former Minister for Finance met with Enet officials about the MANs just 3 months before the MANs contract was extended in the way it was raises more questions and this is why I have asked the Taoiseach to extend any review of the NBP process to date to include a review of the process leading up to the NBP; namely the MANs contract.”

Previously: Courting David