Beware Of Pundits Crying Chaos

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stephencollinsJulien Mercille hi res

From top: Stephen Collins; Julien Mercille

For the establishment the choice is simple.

Stability or ANARCHY.

Dr Julien Mercille writes:

Stephen Collins is the Irish Times political editor. I see him in effect as a de facto government spokesperson [so closely do his views mirror those of the coalition].

His latest article on the upcoming elections conveys the government’s message. It is entitled “Stability or Chaos is the Choice Facing the Irish Electorate

The alleged choice between “Stability or Chaos?” is one you will hear repeated often in the coming weeks. The claim is that voting for mainstream parties will preserve stability, while voting for independents and anti-austerity parties will bring chaos.

But this is a propaganda trick. Of course, we think of “stability” as a good thing and “chaos” as a bad thing. Therefore it’s supposed to make you want to vote for Enda Kenny again.

But the reality is this: the “stability” that Collins longs for is in fact the “stability of the Irish establishment”, which he thinks must be protected. “Chaos”, on the other hand, is anything that disrupts the establishment and takes away its prerogatives.

A few illustrations may be found on the website of the Nevin Research Institute, which produces two documents every three months that are must-reads for anybody who wants to understand the economy: the Quarterly Economic Observer and the Quarterly Economic Facts.

They give a picture of the economy and present key indicators about the state of the economy in a language that is easy to understand. It just released the documents for the Autumn quarter.

What kind of “stability” have the mainstream parties given us, and would logically continue giving us if re-elected?

As David McWilliams’ excellent documentary The Great Wealth Divide showed, wealth is still very concentrated in Ireland. The top-20% of households own 73% of the country’s wealth. The top 10% own 54% and the top 1% own 15%. Stability means this won’t change.

The budget is still focused on cutting taxes, which are regressive and unnecessary as Ireland is a low-tax, low-spend economy, which prevents investment in public services. This gives us the stability of poor public services.

We have a 21% rate of unemployment and under-employment combined (under-employed people are those who would like to work full-time but are stuck in part-time jobs). For the last 5 years, that number has remained very stable indeed, oscillating between 330,000 and 475,000 people.

The unemployment rate is still at nearly 10%, rather stable as well, as it is not falling very rapidly.

The youth unemployment rate (for those under the age of 25) is still at 21%. Stability again.

The deprivation rate is still very high, at 31%. Stability here too.

Sure, you could counter that whatever the poor state of the economy, we are now in recovery mode, so things are getting better. This is true, things are getting better and the recovery is becoming more real. But unless we adopt the low standards of Fine Gael-Labour, we should quickly point out that things could be much better if the government made better decisions.

What are those better decisions? They are policies that Stephen Collins would call “chaotic”. But in fact, they would actually improve our quality of life and the economy.

For example, there are a series of projects that could be accomplished:

More investment to upgrade our poor-quality infrastructure. This will raise economic productivity, among other things. IBEC, the employers association, agrees and calls for €1 billion extra investment in the upcoming budget. The population also agrees and wants more spending, not tax cuts, as revealed by an important Irish Times opinion poll just released.

Wealth tax on the rich. Even a small tax could raise about €300 million according to the Nevin Institute. You don’t need to be a member of the hard left to call for this. David McWilliams did in The Great Wealth Divide, just like economist Stephen Kinsella in the Sunday Business Post, along with many others.

Invest in better public services so we can catch up with other countries. This will lower our cost of living (for example, thanks to cheaper public transportation and health care costs) and would increase employment take up and retention (for example, if the state provided better childcare services, parents would find it easier to work).

Don’t cut taxes: Ireland is already a low-tax economy, and in any case, the tax cuts proposed by the government in the upcoming budget are regressive, meaning that they will mostly benefit the better off.

There are many more possibilities explained in the Nevin Institute’s documents, and in Unite the Union’s Budget 2016 submission, which can be found here.

In short, the choice is not between “stability” and “chaos”. It’s between supporting the establishment, or supporting everybody else.

Julien Mercille is a lecturer at UCD. His book Deepening Neoliberalism, Austerity, and Crisis: Europe’s Treasure Ireland is out. Follow Julien on Twitter: @JulienMercille

93 thoughts on “Beware Of Pundits Crying Chaos

  1. ahjayzis

    +1

    I’m so sick already of hearing ‘stability’ bandied about like it’s an end in itself.
    It’s completely meaningless. The most stable governments we’ve ever had gave us the bubble and the great depression we’ve been living in since.

  2. AlisonT

    Wealth tax is fine as long as it includes Farms. All the parties that are promoting it want to tax someone who for example owns a share of a €1m business employing 20 people but they want to exempt a farmer who has a €1million business employing one person.

    1. Brendan Cafferty

      Growth of 7% is not to be sneezed at, jobs position looking good. We need to attract foreign investment,we are a small open island economy. The troubles we caused here were caused by a few reckless people, mostly developers and banks who had no regard for rules of lending. Thus we had the IMF, Trioka come here,lets hope we will never go back to that reckless time, though I cant be sure.

      1. ahjayzis

        “The troubles we caused here were caused by a few reckless people, mostly developers and banks who had no regard for rules of lending.”

        And a very stable government with much the same ideological focus as FG/Labour fanning the flames and completely letting them get away iwth murder. how you can diagnose the crisis without bringing up the State’s complicity is unreal.

        “We need to attract foreign investment,we are a small open island economy”

        We already do that *really* well – we need to focus more on developing our own industries that stand the test of time and don’t pull out at the merest mention of actually enforcing our corporation tax rate. Being an “open” economy works both ways, we should be flogging our wares abroad and not just contenting ourselves with being first choice for multinationals looking for a high-end call centre.

        1. MoyestWithExcitement

          “Growth of 7% is not to be sneezed at”

          I don’t know about you, but I’m not earning 7% more money than I was in 2008. Trickle down economics is horseshyte, friend. We accept it in this country though because we’ve no self confidence as a society. The lads at the top aren’t going to spend their extra money on creating jobs. They’ll put it in the bank. It’s demand that creates jobs.

      2. FoxFire

        Described as a widely known Fine Gael supporter, Mr Cafferty said the item was a ‘biased rant’ against the Government’s efforts to rescue the country from ‘the disastrous economic situation it found itself in when assuming office’.

        Go spout your lies and spin-doctored nonsense somewhere else.
        Any improvement in economic situation in this country has been in spite of Govt efforts – not because of it, and nobody with two brain cells is believing that nonsense that FG and it’s “supporters” come out with!

        Oh and “supporters” of political parties are an inherent insult to democracy – just spouting the party line no matter how badly they perform, unwilling to accept or criticise “their” party.

      3. Rowsdower

        No, we need to promote indigenous business and development.

        Attracting foreign investment leaves you subject to the whims of multi nationals who are always seeking to cut costs and move jobs to cheaper countries.

      4. KevM

        2.5% of the growth number is from Contracted Manufacturing – products/services are made elsewhere and registered for sale in Ireland to help avoid taxation. It does nothing to increase employment etc.
        So the 6% the government continue to trot out is really only 3.5-3.8% growth – similar to the U.K, Hungary, Malta.

        Eurostat puts it at 5.2%, not the govs 6% or 7%
        http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/tgm/table.do?tab=table&init=1&language=en&pcode=tec00115&plugin=1

        The is no real recovery. The dependency rate is 53.7% – meaning 1 in 2 people in this state depend on the government spending to stay out of poverty.
        Increasing homelessness, increasing impoverishment and those stats from Nevin institute show the reality – This is an unequal recovery, coming out of an unfair, regressive ‘austerity’ regime.

  3. Just sayin'

    “Stephen Collins is the Irish Times political editor. I see him in effect as a de facto government spokesperson.”

    That is a massive slur on a journalist just because he doesn’t share Mercille’s ideological leanings.

    1. rob

      Whatever about Collins’ political leanings or writings, that remark by Mercille is borderline defamatory. In effect, he is saying that Collins uses his position to work for the Government. And no, I’m not an FG voter!

    2. pardon

      “Julien Mercille is a writer for “An Phoblacht”. I see him in effect as spokesperson for a de facto terrorist organisation.

    3. serf

      This is hilarious:- Stephen Collins is called out as a biased commentator and mouthpiece of Govt propaganda. Meanwhile Mercile trots out counter opinions from the Nevin institute – which he fails to remind the reader is a trade union funded think tank – as objective facts

  4. Herya

    All great points, but show me a party that has them in their programme. Irish parties are either of “establishment” or “hand out cash to the unfortunate” variety, none of them is focused on system building the way he describes it.

      1. rob

        It would be great if we could prioritise spending on public services in Ireland. I’d much rather that happens than having an extra 50 euro in my pocket. I agree with Mercille on that point.

        1. MoyestWithExcitement

          You know what would also be great? Term limits for politicians. For too many of them, their focus is on their career so all decision making is to that end anything beneficial for the rest of us is just a bonus. That leads to them sucking up to the powerful. If they know they’re back teaching kids after 2 or 3 terms no matter what they do, their decision making might actually be focused on what’s best for society. Professional politicians are a big problem.

          1. ahjayzis

            DART underground being a huge example. Something like Crossrail or the Big Dig could never happen in Ireland. A twenty year project serves no purpose for a politician focused on the electoral cycle.

            City investment which benefits the entire country can’t be prioritised by a body relying on Biddie in Ballygobackwards sniffing at public transport in the capital city.

          2. cluster

            The real reason that Crossrail couldn’t happen here is that politically Dublin is actuallt rather weak compared to the ‘real’ Ireland of rural Ireland (used to refer to everywhere outside Dublin). The UK approach of pumping everything into London (correct or not) to create one global city could not even be countenanced here.

            The Big Dig is probabl;y not what we want anyway – it was an absolute sh!tstorm with material failures, wildly expanding budget, about a decade late, threats of legal action on all sides, etc.

          3. NotTheBogeyMan

            How about term limits for journalists as the x, y or z correspondent.
            Anyone know how long Collins has been in the same position?
            I can’t hear RTE crime correspondent Paul Reynolds voice without wondering who fed him the leaks he’s reporting and how reluctant he’d be to ever bite the hand that feeds him

      2. Herya

        That’s a good point. Actually I forgot about them – sadly not much communication from them after the launch?

  5. nellyb

    80 years ago Collins type wisemen paved the way for collaborationism in Europe. Not saying Collins inciting it, but it sounds similar. Stability requires dialog with public, it can’t be maintained unilaterally. Collins knows that – so why making half baked grand statements? Hope it’s only for the sale of paper.

  6. mmm

    What I learned at school today:

    “Of course, we think of “stability” as a good thing and “chaos” as a bad thing. Therefore it’s supposed to make you want to vote for Enda Kenny again” = Julien paying homage to Churchill. “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”

    “As David McWilliams’ excellent documentary The Great Wealth Divide” = Jules sparking an affair with the establishment. #RTE #Nepotism #$$ #Infamy

    1. Clampers Outside!

      How much was that tinfoil hat? …I don’t think it’s keeping out the radiation from the lizard guns and you may need a new one. Supervalu tinfoil is thicker than LiDLs, hope that helps.

      1. mmm

        Decided to go Deutsch and don the head armour. Am dancing to the beat of humour and common sense. Swing those hips, lose those inhibitions and come join me , mein kleiner Engel Clampers.xxx

  7. Dubloony

    Ireland is a low tax economy? Really? Must have a word with the payroll guys, cos it certainly doesn’t feel that way.

    1. serf

      Well, inconvenient as it may be for Mr Mercile, Ireland is a low tax economy for the low paid. Not for middle and higher income workers.

      1. Seriously

        I agree regarding the middle squeeze but it depends what you mean by higher earners here. People earning over 33K are being charged the same rate (on everything higher than 33k) as someone on 330k. That’s hardly a high tax economy for the truly higher earners though is it?

        Surely another band for rich people, say 61% for earnings over 150k would be fair, no?

        1. cluster

          Perhaps it would but your semantics about the marginal rate aren’t really the point. For someone on 33k, Ireland is a low-tax economy.

          Have a look at these OECD charts. Until you are earning approx 200% of the average wage (about 54k) you have a significantly lower inocme tax burden than the OECD norm.

          1. Seriously

            Great link, thanks for that. I look forward to getting the time to read properly.

            From a quick glance at the charts there does seem to be a wide gap between single people and families, with single people much closer to the OECD rate while people with children much further below average. Something I’m sure no politician would ever rectify in this country!

          1. John S

            Presume he means the tax to GDP ratio. We are below the OECD average.

            Since the year 2000, the tax burden in Ireland has declined from 30.9 per cent to 28.3 per cent. Over the same period, the OECD average in 2013 was slightly less than in 2000 (34.1 per cent compared with 34.3 per cent).”

            Irish taxes on personal income, profits and other gains represent 33 per cent of total revenues, compared with the OECD average of 25 per cent. Taxes on corporate profits represent 8 per cent of total revenues, compared with the 9 per cent OECD average.

            “The OECD’s biennial Consumption Tax Trends report found that VAT revenues in Ireland accounted for 21.7 per cent of total tax revenue, above the OECD average of 19.5 per cent,” the body said.

            Irish social security contributions represent 15 per cent of the total, compared with the 26 per cent OECD average.

            Also not included in that article is that employers in Ireland currently pay PRSI rates of less than 8%, compared to an average of 21% in the EU 15.

            http://www.irishtimes.com/business/energy-and-resources/tax-levels-in-ireland-lag-oecd-average-1.2031991

    2. rob

      It’s not a low-tax economy, the basic income tax is comparable with other EU states, but then we get hit with a range of stealth taxes.

  8. Owen C

    “More investment to upgrade our poor-quality infrastructure. This will raise economic productivity, among other things. IBEC, the employers association, agrees and calls for €1 billion extra investment in the upcoming budget. ”

    So Merceille is now citing approvingly IBEC ideas? This is obviously mildly hilarious in a have-cake-and-eat-it kinda way.

    “The unemployment rate is still at nearly 10%, rather stable as well, as it is not falling very rapidly.”

    Its 9.5%. It was 10.4% at end 2014, 12.2% at end 2013. It actually is falling rather rapidly. It is not in fact stable, unless our reference point for this is July, cos it was 9.7% in June and 10% in March. In fact, the annual % reduction in unemployment is currently at -14% (ie 9.5% vs 11.1% in Aug 2014). This is still in the same ballpark as the fastest rate of reduction in unemployment in Ireland over the course of the crisis (peak y/y fall was reached at -16% in March this year). Once again, demonstrable empirical evidence is something Julien is incredibly poor at using.

    “Invest in better public services so we can catch up with other countries. This will lower our cost of living (for example, thanks to cheaper public transportation and health care costs)”

    This is simply an opinion which is not backed up by any facts. The investment in public services will be both in the hard assets required (buses, trains, hospital buildings, equipment) as well as the running costs (staff etc). Only if we invest/run these better than the private sector could will we have a cheaper cost of living, given that the funding of these services comes from tax revenue. Some services may indeed be provided better/cheaper by the public sector than by the private sector. But some will obviously (ie via experience) not be and will therefore increase the average persons cost of living. Again, he creates ‘facts’ that are merely subjective opinion of Merceille.

    “The youth unemployment rate (for those under the age of 25) is still at 21%. Stability again.”

    Again, this has fallen from a high of 31% in 2012, 26% around 18 months ago, to 20.7% today. The male youth unemployment rate has fallen from 37.4% to 22.7%, and was 28% in early 2014 and 25.7% in early 2015. Does this sound like a “stable” rate?

    I’m sorry, but this noncense has to stop. Merceille makes some useful and interesting points about media bias, inequality, austerity etc, but he regularly provides shoddy, inaccurate or outright wrong analysis which are based on his political and economic opinions and not on actual facts

    1. ahjayzis

      On youth unemployment – how many of that fall is accounted for the mass exodus of people in their twenties from the country? And in what way is it ‘stable’ to have lost a gigantic chunk of the educated young professionals the country has paid to educate?

      1. Owen C

        I don’t know, what proportion of that fall is due to mass emigration? Do I have to do the fact checking for you as well as for Julien? On a positive note, we could probably knock one more person off the unemployment figures if we had them fact checking Julien all the time.

        The simple point is that Julien could have elaborated on how the headline figures did not show the instability in the underlying data. But he didn’t, cos he’s lazy. He said the headlines figures were high and that this stability is bad. He is wrong in this analysis of the headline data, as they are not stable and are falling quite sharply.

        1. ahjayzis

          “Do I have to do the fact checking for you as well as for Julien?”

          It’s way too early of a Monday to deal with that level of snide prickishness…

          1. Owen C

            The object was not to be snide. It was to show how ridiculous it is that I should have to provide proof/answers for your questions, when really the object of your questions should be Merceille himself. Merceille has made statements, I have made fairly compelling factual counterstatements which seem to suggest Merceille is wrong, your response is to ask me new questions. Sorry if I don’t want to spend my morning providing reams and reams of additional counterfactual to Merceille’s error-ridden rants.

        2. offftmooft

          And when ya add in all those free labour schemes? Work for your dole or be penalised? Just Google ‘finfacts.ie Irish government understates recession job losses’ plenty of raw data to counteract the massaged 10% figure its bout twice dat if ya take the forced labour into account.

  9. Lordblessusandsaveus

    Young Fine Gaelers have this guy in their sights. They comment here every time his posts go up and they also track him around anywhere he is published and try to undermine him. Apparently they actually had a side room meeting about him recently in one of the regional councils.

    1. rob

      sounds like a bit of a conspiracy theory! It’s the first time I’ve ever read anything by him.

      I agree with him about the need for more spending but do not like his personal attack on Collins.

      I’m not an FG voter and I’m not young either!

      1. Lordblessusandsaveus

        Why did you assume I was referring to you? I haven’t read any of your comments. You’ve raised the suspicion that you ARE a member of Fine Gael by defending yourself without an accusation being leveled at you.

        1. rob

          I assumed you were making this assumption because you are making similar claims about other people in the comments section who are not agreeing with Mercille’s opinions in their entirety.

          I replied with he conspiracy theory comment about your claim that the main government party’s youth division are having meetings because they ‘have this guy in their sights’ because it sounds like a sub-plot from a cheap thriller.

          So the fact that I replied to you means I’m in Fine Gael? This is so ludicrous it’s just too funny. It’s like the crucifixion scene in Life of Brian in reverse

      2. cluster

        rob – get over this stupid ‘young FG’ line. It is nowhere near as clever or effective as you think and it becomes very slightly more meaningless every time it is trotted out.

        If you disagree with those ‘Young FGers’, there is nothing stopping you from wading in & proving your point. Maybe you could should where & how they are being disingenuous rather than lumping anybody who disagrees in any way with Merceille into the same little box.

        1. rob

          eh? I don’t disagree with Mercille, I agree we need to spend more public money.

          It wasn’t me who raised this whole young FG thing, one of the other posters said that young FG have Mercille ‘in their sights’, which is just so daft it’s funny.

          I just didn’t like the personal attack on Stephen Collins, even though I disagree with his politics.

          That is all.

    2. Rowsdower

      The problem I have is that every time he writes something its posted on this site like its his own personal blog.

      1. pardon

        … I love the regurgitation of Friday night in the local. Brings back such fond memories on a Monday morning. I get mee “serious ” reading from da real newspapers. Dat’s enuff.

  10. Goodnight Ireland

    While obviously there is a strong anti austerity feeling with parts of the electorate, there is also a severe disillusionment with the political establishment.

    Does anyone really think Kenny is a good political leader? He won the last election because FF imploded. We just get more of the same each election. Labour are a joke. No real identity, and certainly no link with the working class.

    I will give my vote to a party/independent who campaigns on reform the political system.

  11. Lordblessusandsaveus

    Most of the drop in unemployment is down to emigrations and fake jobs programs like Jobbridge.

    Also, don’t forget many talented people emigrate because of the corrupt political regime here which has pervaded since 1922, carefully controlled by partners in crime, Fine Gael and Fianna Fail and their spit roasting of Labour.

    1. Rob_G

      Most of the drop in unemployment is down to emigrations and fake jobs programs like Jobbridge.
      – any statistics or figures to support this scutter?

      1. Owen C

        There were 82,161 people on “activation programmes” (ie Jobbridge etc) in April 2012 when unemployment was at 15%.
        There are currently 67,246 people on activation programmes with unemployment at 9.5%.

        Total labour force in Q2 2012 was 2.159mn. Total labour force in Q2 2015 was 2,170mn.
        Total employed in Q2 2012 was 1.836mn. Total employed in Q2 2015 was 1.959mn.

        So, it is again an empirical fact that the reduction in the unemployment rate has not been due to unemployment or job activation programmes like Jobbridge. Anyone suggesting otherwise is either doing so for political ideological reasons or because they can’t understand basic economic data. Or in some cases probably a mixture of both.

    2. Keith

      Most of the drop in unemployment is down to emigrations and fake jobs programs like Jobbridge.

      There are definitely more people working: http://www.cso.ie/indicators/default.aspx?id=1QNQ03.
      My understanding is that the number of people emigrating is decreasing as well. Wish it happened quicker, I’ve family abroad who want to come home like most people.

      Also, don’t forget many talented people emigrate because of the corrupt political regime…

      Really? Talented people emigrate because they think there are better opportunities to become more talented elsewhere.

  12. Stephen

    How about increasing our corporate tax rate from 12.5% to 15%? We’d still have one of the lowest rates in the EU, so there wouldn’t be much incentive for a large multinational to leave just because of that. Probably a few million to be made there.

  13. ollie

    “the corrupt political regime here which has pervaded since 1922”. This is the root cause of all of this Countries problems.
    From the 20s to the 60s, when a huge percentage of citizens lived in poverty while the ruling classes ponced around, through the 70s and 80s when people like Charile Haughey were more interested in personal gain than the public interest, into the 90s when Bertie Ahern was taking is “dig outs”, and on to the present where people are able to buy information from government ministers to fill their bank accounts.
    And through all of these years government has loaded the debts of failed institutions on to citizens; PMPA, ICI, Quinn Insurance to name but a few.
    And today we hear the Alan Kelly wants to bypass the tendering process for modual houses, and who owns Roankabin, who would be prime candidates to get this business? Siteserv.

  14. ahjayzis

    I don’t usually buy into the whole “shinnerbot vs FG Youth” invasion theories that are all over the TheJournal etc, but the hysterical reaction Mercille gets from spouting fairly normal leftwingisms every Monday is really OTT and from people who I don’t think you see commenting anywhere else on BS? :o/

    1. Declan

      True but I thinks it’s an Irish thing, we just want to get the fecker but also be him : )

      That said, the level of argument is better than most threads and he’s the modern version of a holy joe (couldn’t help it).

      However Stephen would be accurately described as having right ish views just like Julien has left ish views. Can’t they all just get along and meet up for a Sri k on Friday night to talk about what they would do if elected (TV show in that)

    2. rob

      I don’t think the reaction has been hysterical at all and is quite respectful for the main. I agree 100% with what he is saying about putting a priority on spending. (however this is my first time commenting on a Mercille piece, so maybe the tone is calmer this time?)

    1. Deluded

      ok computer

      Earners__ Net wealth__ Tax-Take
      top 5% _____ 40%______50%
      middle 55% __48%______50%
      bottom 40% __12%______0%

  15. Kolmo

    How are we a low-tax economy? VAT, VRT, Alcohol Taxes, tobacco taxes (agree with.) TV taxes, inheritance taxes, 50% income taxes and charges etc etc ad nauseum, how is it low?

    1. ahjayzis

      And after all that – you pay for a visit to the GP / A+E, bin collections, water, school contributions, “free” third level for a cost of 3K a year, prescription charge, road tolls, the list goes on. Everything is top-up fees atop stealth taxes atop primary taxes.

    2. John S

      Presume he means the tax to GDP ratio. We are below the OECD average for that.

      The article below helps explain why it doesn’t seem like a low tax economy..

      Since the year 2000, the tax burden in Ireland has declined from 30.9 per cent to 28.3 per cent. Over the same period, the OECD average in 2013 was slightly less than in 2000 (34.1 per cent compared with 34.3 per cent).”

      Irish taxes on personal income, profits and other gains represent 33 per cent of total revenues, compared with the OECD average of 25 per cent. Taxes on corporate profits represent 8 per cent of total revenues, compared with the 9 per cent OECD average.

      Irish social security contributions represent 15 per cent of the total, compared with the 26 per cent OECD average.

      Also not included in that article is that employers in Ireland currently pay PRSI rates of less than 8%, compared to an average of 21% in the EU 15.

      “The OECD’s biennial Consumption Tax Trends report found that VAT revenues in Ireland accounted for 21.7 per cent of total tax revenue, above the OECD average of 19.5 per cent,” the body said.

      http://www.irishtimes.com/business/energy-and-resources/tax-levels-in-ireland-lag-oecd-average-1.2031991

      1. Kolmo

        How about Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Ebay, nearly all the Pharmas, IFSC laundering finance houses pay some Fahooking tax on their huge profits and not just the schlubs working there on their shaky employment contracts

  16. Truth in the News

    Elect this junta again for stability really, they reason the got in was to reject
    FF and the Greens 4 year Plan, they turned round when they got into power
    implemented it to the letter, what would be unemployment rate if there was no
    emigration of our youth, the next election will be fought on austerity taxes ie
    Water Tax, Property Tax and Universal Social Tax and inward uncontrolled migration and the only “Chaos” will be in the media coming to terms with upheaval of the staus quo
    Incidently 10000 farmers get CAP payments of over 50K and 33 thousand get
    less than 5 thousand and this was pushed through to stay in place to 2019
    Its time the elite at the top of the IFA were tackled as who they represent, is it
    ranchers or the small farmers. seems to be ranchers….We need more voices like
    Julian Mercille and David McWilliams…..and less spin merchants.

  17. New Person A

    Mercile, less tripe dressed up as fact
    Devoid of reason, insight or tact
    You spill this drivel every Monday am
    I can’t take your delusional spam
    Wails every finnerbot, ffer and green
    Halfwit, fuppwit, rogue and gombeen

Comments are closed.