Mi Casa Tu Casa

at

90402782904027789040278090402785airbnb chart2

The number of hosts in Ireland has doubled every year since 2010. Over 330,000 people from all over the world have stayed in [Airbnb] homes across Ireland.

This morning.

Airbnb HQ, The Watermarque Building, Ringsend, Dublin 4.

Airbnb’s Head of Public Policy Patrick Robinson (top) at a press conference to discuss the impact of home sharing on the economy.

Nice office, in fairness.

Airbnb Working to Overcome Tax Issue (98FM)

26 thoughts on “Mi Casa Tu Casa

  1. Digs

    AIRBNB is a wolf in sheeps clothing. People initially looked to rent unused apartments or vacation rentals as means of avoiding hotels and inflated pricing. Now all those hoteliers,estate agents and letting agents have hijacked the site and are using it as just another platform to gouge. If you’re dealing direct with a small owner who’s got say one or two properties, you can negotiate a deal. Not so with business’s who’s main concern is dictating market value. Couple that with the huge chunk AIRBNB take themselves and the experience becomes dismal. I recently saved 30% by contacting the letting people direct. Owners direct is another site that went the same way. It’s a pity there isn’t a site that genuinely doesn’t cater for non commercial entities. Horse s…t of a site. I wish they did tax “hosts” with significant letting portfolios.

    1. Medium Sized C

      While I don’t think you can blame AirBnB for gougey gouger estate agents using the platform to gouge, I agree with most of that and encourage you to abuse Estate agents, auctioneers and other proponents of gougery more often in future.

    2. Chris

      -okay sir that’s everything here’s your keys enjoy your stay, anything else?
      -well I wasn’t going to say anything but now you mention it this looks nothing like the pictures, it’s supposed to be a light and spacious apartment but it looks more like a mangy wolf?
      -unfortunately correct sir, but look we’ve dressed him up for you!
      -is that, what that is, is that…sheeps wool???
      -yes, it’s all we could get at short notice, sorry.

  2. Clampers Outside!

    “Airbnb community contributes €202 million to Irish economy”

    Em… no it doesn’t, those tourists didn’t come just because of AirBNB ffs… AirBNB took the opportunity of attracting tourists to their service… they didn’t ‘create’ this contribution which is what is being claimed.

    All AirBNBs should be paying tax, end of.

    1. 15 cents

      if the tax was 20% or something like that it’d be grand .. but 51% is just counter productive. it makes in non-viable for hosts, who will then either remove their property from the site or charge well over the odds to counter the insanely high tax.

        1. 15 cents

          i dont necessarily agree hosts should pay tax .. in fact, ideally they shouldnt be, because with tourists using air bnbs, real people are getting money direct, which goes back into the economy as well as giving hosts a boost to spend their own money as the rent from air bnb guests helps/covers their own rent. Now that will never happen, because government, revenue, are all too short sighted. Which will never change. But by charging it at 51% they threaten to destroy it. if they did it at 20% it would be more sustainable for all involved. But they wont. Theyre short sighted and irrational, and as a government, quite the opposite of progressive, and would never make a ballsy move or give a new idea a chance.

        1. 15 cents

          i dont necessarily agree hosts should pay tax .. in fact, ideally they shouldnt be, because with tourists using air bnbs, real people are getting money direct, which goes back into the economy as well as giving hosts a boost to spend their own money as the rent from air bnb guests helps/covers their own rent. Now that will never happen, because government, revenue, are all too short sighted. Which will never change. But by charging it at 51% they threaten to destroy it. if they did it at 20% it would be more sustainable for all involved. But they wont. Theyre short sighted and irrational, and as a government, quite the opposite of progressive, and would never make a ballsy move or give a new idea a chance.

          1. Clampers Outside!

            “i dont necessarily agree hosts should pay tax ..”
            Tourism is one of the country’s biggest industries… and you want to open up a ‘tax free’ accommodation for owner occupiers….. seriously?

            Those in homes in the 80s paying mortgage interest upwards of 14% paid tax on the B&B earnings they made. I’m sure todays hard done by can too.

            “Ballsy move”… Where? To allow a bunch of homes to earn tax free all year round to the detriment of employers and tax paying businesses.

            “New idea” – Where? The only thing new that AirBNB have done is put an offering that was already there on a website.

            The vast majority of people on AirBNB only went there because they thought they’d get away without paying tax. Only a moron would have thought that the tenant ‘tax free medium to long term stay in a home’ (don’t know official name of it) would apply to a “guest house” or B&B.
            And then it’s this same stupidity that has lead to this debate. If the idiots got it right from the start there’d be no more discussion. But people took a risk, and got caught. Tough fuppin’ sh*t.

            51 may be steep, agreed. But no tax, is completely stupid and anyone who says they thought they could do this tax free is a liar… or a complete and utter buffoon.

        1. ahyeah

          There’s a bit more to calculating that figure than just adding up estimates of what Airbnb guests spent while in Ireland and saying “We contributed this”. Unlike a huge number of big hotels here now, Airbnb hosts don’t routinely repatriate their profits (some do). It can also be shown that Airbnb guests are far, far more likely to eat, drink and shop in local, independent cafes, restaurants, bars and shops etc – partly because Airbnb gaffs aren’t all centred around Dublin 2. The cash is spread much more evenly and goes into the local economy.

          None of this means they shouldn’t pay tax. That’s just a silly argument.

          1. Clampers Outside!

            Hear, hear… I’ve emailed the ‘journo’ on it asking how much AirBNB spent attracting those ‘new’ tourists (domestic and abroad) to stay in AirBNBs, that lead to an increase of new money totalling €202m….

            ….I’m still waiting a response, probably won’t get one because I accused the writer (‘journo’ me eye) of transcribing a press release from AirBNB in my mail….. ah well…

  3. SusanTheSilent

    Mi Casa, Tu Casa or where the FCUK is your Casa?

    Dear Bodger

    If you have a copy of Golden Pages to hand, leaf through to the back where you’ll find a lovely little diagram of Dublin divided into post codes containing its various villages, courtesy of An Post. It would save you the trouble of hauling the entire village of Ringsend to the other side of the Grand Canal where you will find Dublin 2.

    On the other hand you could just leave it where it is in Dublin 4, sure it’s been there long before the Department of Post and Telegraphs came up with the post codes in the first place.

    Just sayin’…

  4. Chris

    …and if you look to this slide you’ll see a picture of us grassing up all you renters to the Revenue. Any questions before we move on, good, next up….

      1. Chris

        In the words of the Scottish man who complained about Tesco on Twitter but then refused to tell them which store he was referring to, ‘Ahm no a grass!’

      2. 15 cents

        youre mad about the tax things .. you’re adamant that all these hosts should get whacked with the 51% tax, yet you don’t seem to mind that the actual company themselves pay a measily 12% or whatever in corporate tax. why aren’t you so engrossed with corporate tax being increased as you are with regular punters tryna help with their rents gettin hammered with a 51% rate?

        1. ahyeah

          @15cents

          Why do you persist with this “51%” nonsense?

          It’s not 51%. For starters, it’s profit, not revenue, that’s taxed. And the base rate is 20%.

          Don’t let the facts get in the way of hysteria, though.

          1. 15 cents

            if i have a job .. and i earn from that, and then i let my house our on air bnb, if i make 900 euro one month from air bnb alone, that gets taxed at 51%. is that not right? genuine question, that is my understanding but if thats wrong id like to know (minus the snipey tone)

          2. ahyeah

            No, that’s not right. If you rent out one room in your 2 bed apartment for, say, €1500 a month on Airbnb, you won’t pay 51% tax.

            To start with, your rent/mortgage on a 2 bed in GCD or wherever is probably €1500. So you write half of that off (€750). You need Internet connectivity and a smartphone to use Airbnb… so the cost of that comes off, too. And half of your electricity, gas, refuse, water, toilet roll, shower gel….

            By the end of it, your ‘profit’ is probably €100. And if you pay tax at 51%, you send €51 to the Revenue. Not really such a big deal, is it?

        2. Clampers Outside!

          Excuse me 15 cents, but go make your assumptions else where. The debate here is whether tax should be paid or not by AirBNB guest houses.

          It should.

          I never (until a moment ago, on a post above) mentioned the amount.
          Nor did I mention anything about our govts unwillingness to tax multinationals correctly.

          By the way… I do fupping mind, I mind a whole great deal, but that’s not the discussion.
          Stick to the points in discussion, thanks.

          1. 15 cents

            i replied to yer mans thing about it being 51% of profits but admin dont trust me and monitor all my comments so it hasnt been approved yet. . . it is 51%, for the majority, not for if its your sole income. if you have a job and you rent out ur gaff on air bnb, youre taxed 51% on whatever you make off air bnb. and yes, i think that is too high, i think about 20% would be someway reasonable, considering the governement didnt do anything to help me rent my home out to tourists. they’d get 20% for absolutely nothing. I think 51% is far too high and will jeopardise a good thing.

Comments are closed.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!