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42 thoughts on “De Monday Papers

    1. SOQ

      In fairness, when it came to NI, there was a deliberate disinformation policy by successive British governments. If there is one good thing to come out of all of this it is that the average British person is now looking at the DUP and going WTF?

      Reply
    1. Hansel

      De paper has really lowered its standards in recent years. Mick Clifford aside, there aren’t too many serious journalists left because they just can’t afford to pay any more.

      Reply
  1. Ollie Cromwell

    Just to be clear is this another Britain knows nothing about its history week or a poppy-wearing Britain is obsessed with its history week ?
    I’ll give you a clue – the average Brit doesn’t give a toss about Ireland in much the same way they don’t give a toss about Malta,another insignificant EU island.
    The care mostly about their family,their work and their leisure activities just like the Irish.
    You need to get over your inferiority complex.

    Reply
  2. Cranky Pants

    Nanny Morris is correct.

    Too many poor people have too convenient access to alcohol.

    We should stop selling it altogether. At least to poor people.

    Reply
    1. bisted

      …you call this early…you have many of the credentials to get membership up FG but you’ll have to get up earlier in the morning…your many fans have been calling for your comments for hours now…

      Reply
  3. Ollie Cromwell

    Today’s #despitebrexit news.

    The latest global figures from the UN for Foreign Direct Investment show the UK is currently ranked second best in the world, with $65.5 billion of FDI coming into the UK in the first half of 2018 alone, just behind China on $70.2 billion.

    The Netherlands lags behind the UK in fourth place with $44.8 billion, while Spain is the only other EU country to make the top ten in eighth with $29.8 billion.

    Not a single one of the other 25 EU member states has even managed to secure one third as much FDI as the UK.

    So much for businesses not wanting to invest in Brexit Britain.

    Boom !

    Reply
    1. dav

      Doesn’t provide a source…. snigger
      https://news.un.org/en/audio/2018/10/1023232
      “Foreign direct investment, which is usually referred to as FDI, is an “accelerator” of the global economy, because it gives countries access to external capital, technology, market access and taxable income.

      However, according to a new report by the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), it has fallen more than 40 per cent in the first half of 2018, compared with the same period last year, with developing economies escaping the worst of the downturn.”

      Reply
      1. Ollie Cromwell

        Actually it was UNCTAD behind the latest and impressive FDI figures.
        For a country that’s meant to be tottering towards economic ruin to be able to pull in almost as much investment as China is some feat.
        And of course Germany and France are nowhere to be seen.
        You’ve only got to stroll across Waterloo Bridge and glance towards the City and the forest of cranes hard at work to know the place is booming.
        Commercial rents are buoyant too.
        So.much for the Project Fear story about 100,000 jobs moving out of the City.
        Latest estimates put the figure in the low thousands.
        You certainly don’t hear many Cockney accents around Dublin’s financial district .

        Reply
        1. dav

          AGAIN Doesn’t provide a source…. snigger

          https://www.gfmag.com/topics/macroeconomy-and-globalization/countries-most-fdi-inflows-2018
          “Decrease in FDI flows to developed economies was a major reason for decline in overall global numbers. Both Europe and North America saw a decline in inflows at -27% and -33% respectively. FDI to developing economies remained stable at $653 billion and saw a 2% increase year-on-year. Investment flows to Latin America, the Caribbean and developing Asia rose marginally. FDI remained flat for Africa.

          Despite the decrease, the United States received the lion’s share of global FDI at $311 billion followed by China that saw record inflows at $144 billion.”

          Reply
  4. Ollie Cromwell

    Britain’s manufacturing industry is on a three day week ?
    That would be news to Britain’s manufacturing industry.
    Jaguar Landrover in Castle Bromwich has put half if its workforce on a three-day week until Christmas because of the collapse in demand for its deisel cars.
    But JLR say ” We are, however, continuing to over-proportionally invest in new products and technologies, and committed to our UK plants in which we have invested more than £4bn since 2010 to future-proof manufacturing technologies to deliver new models.”
    How is Ireland’s manufacturing industry doing ? Does it even have one ? Does it make anything or just import it all from the mainland ?

    Reply
    1. jusayinlike

      Mini plant = 3 day week.

      Ford plant = 3 day week.

      You keep believing the press release’s you upstart you..

      Reply
        1. Ollie Cromwell

          Still waiting for news of the Mini and Ford plants on a 3- day week.
          You’re just making it up as you go along.
          Take your time petal.

          Reply
          1. jusayinlike

            Protective notice/ 3 day week.

            https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/oct/15/ford-u-turn-carmaker-says-no-deal-brexit-could-force-it-to-leave-uk

            “The firm, which employs about 8,000 people in the UK, was due to begin thrashing out a two-year wage deal this autumn. “In agreement with our employee representatives, the 2019-2020 pay negotiations in our UK plant and technical centre will commence in 2019 when we have better clarity on the future business outlook,” said a spokesperson”

            “Nissan, which has previously warned of “serious implications” from a no-deal scenario, said on Monday that it had postponed pay talks with staff until it knew more about the Brexit deal.”

            Fun times.

          2. Ollie Cromwell

            So you’re lying.
            The Ford and Mini plants are not on a 3-day week.
            At least have the guts to say you made it up.
            Why not just cut and paste this ?
            ” Yes,I have been caught out writing a barefaced lie on Broadsheet by saying the Ford and Mini plants in the UK are on 3-day weeks.It was my own poor attempt at Project Fear and I apologise for it.”

    2. Spaghetti Hoop

      Ireland’s manufacturing industry is doing very well, especially in medical and pharma, which it exports globally. What ‘mainland’ are you referring to? We don’t call the EU that.

      Reply
      1. ReproButina

        This guy tries to slag Ireland off for importing while at the same time slagging people in Ireland for coming from an agricultural background. While he’s doing this the UK is relying on agri-food imports from Ireland. The mental gymnastics are Olympic level.

        Reply
  5. johnny

    Expect this before the PAC shortly, the Min has lots questions answer,AIB once again caught again cooking its books, under his and his departments watch.Accounting scandals,can’t keep key people, place is a mess, can the Minister for Finance and his department not run a small sized bank,if not sell it then.

    “What appears to have happened is that AIB allocated the €271m to stage 2, but then shunted a whole load of loans and provisions to stage 3. Through this it constructed the opportunity to create artificial profits,” said Cormac Butler, a financial consultant who has testified before both the Irish and British parliaments on international accounting standards.

    AIB, which is 71 per cent owned by the Irish government, has been lobbying hard for an end to curbs on pay and bonuses. Chairman Richard Pym warned last month that these restrictions were turning the group into a “training ground” for bankers, who then went on to work for higher paying, often foreign firms.

    Mr Byrne recently announced his resignation as chief executive to join Dublin stockbrokers Davy as deputy chief executive. In September, finance director, Mark Bourke, said he would stand down “early next year” to join Novo Banco, a Portuguese bank.”

    https://www.ft.com/content/841a4538-dea7-11e8-9f04-38d397e6661c

    Reply

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