Category Archives: Design

Behold: the Mercedes Benz EQC 4×4² – a conceptual all-electric offroad version of the G-class EQC SUV with portal axles giving a 29cm ride height.

Proprietory software analyses driving parameters, giving audio feedback to the driver and piping sound to the outside world via speakers behind the headlights.

No word as yet on whether the concept will ever make it to full production.

Still.

Vroom.

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Behold: the Deus & Zero SR/S – an all-electric, carbon fibre ’neo retro café racer’ from California-based Zero motorcycles and custom fabricator, Michael “Woolie” Woolaway of Deus Ex Machina.

Designed to promote the Zero SR/F production bike (like this revamp by UK modifier Untitled), its a one-off. You can’t have it.

It’s just for looking at.

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Behold: the 1975 Lamborghini Countach LP400 Periscopica one of only 158 variants of the archetypal 1970s wedge supercar, named for the light channel in the roof that illuminates the rear view mirror making it possible to back up without hanging out over the door sill looking back.

Presented in its original Blu Metallizzato livery with fully documentation and its original drivetrain, it’s yours, with a little shrewd bidding, for €930,000+.

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Behold: the Aston Martin V12 Speedster – a breezy call-back to the open-cockpit (you’ll be wearing a racing helmet) prototype race cars of the 50s and 60s.

Designed from scratch in a year by Aston Martin’s Q division and completely unchanged from the initial concept, the car is currently undergoing road-testing. The twin-turbo 700bhp racer wears a swooping carbon fibre shell on a bonded aluminium chassis with roadholding assisted by adaptive dampers and massive carbon brakes.

Only 88 will be made and they may all be sold already so you can put away that €841,000 in used twenties.

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Behold: the 1952 Ferrari Arno XI Hydroplane – developed to set the speed record in the 800kg class by Cantieri Timossi and the Ferrari Scuderia F1 team.

Fitted with a race-prepped Grand Prix engine adapted to burn methanol, the 502bhp speedboat driven by Achille Castoldi set a 150.49mph (242.2km’h) record that still stands today.

Currently undergoing a complete restoration by Ferrari Classiche, it’s available to buy (complete with full documentation, hundreds of period photographs, handwritten notes from Ferrari’s engineers, and a copy of the U.I.M. record certification that attests to Castoldi’s 1953 speed record.)

Price on application

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