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Aine

Earlier this afternoon, Aine Ní Chonaill spoke to Joe Duffy on Liveline.

Ms Ní Chonaill launched the Immigration Control Platform in Ennis, Co. Clare in January, 1998. A few months prior to that, the West Cork teacher stood in the June 1997 general election on an anti-immigration ticket, gaining 293 votes in Cork South-West.

She also ran for Dublin South Central in the 2002 election, above, where she gained 926 votes.

Ms Ní Chonaill featured on show as a follow-up to yesterday’s programme, during which an asylum seeker from Syria, called Ali, talked to Joe about the six years he lived in an accommodation centre in Dublin.

From their conversation:

Áine Ní Chonaill: “Anyone who abuses the asylum system, just as a way to get to the West, and it is massively abused, is an invader of our country.”

Joe Duffy: “An invader?”

Ní Chonaill: “Anyone who barges their way into your country, against your will…”

Duffy: “Now it’s not my, your country. I mean who’s country is it?”

Ní Chonaill: “This is the country of Irish people. Do you think I’m making some exception of myself…”

Duffy: “You don’t own it?”

Ní Chonaill: “I beg your pardon?”

Duffy: “We don’t own the country, when you say ‘your country’.”

Ní Chonaill: “We most certainly do own our country. If you think we don’t own our own country, Joe, you’ve got a very big problem.”

Duffy: “Maybe I have. They’re invaders?”

Ní Chonaill: “Anyone who is an illegal immigrant, ‘i’ ‘double l’, illegal, or I add on an asylum abuser is such a person.”

Duffy: “OK. What is the purpose of this invasion?”

Ní Chonaill: “To get to live in the West.”

Duffy: “Yeah, and do they want to rob anything off you or me or pillage or rape or…”

Ní Chonaill: “Well, excuse me, they want to rob from…”

Duffy: “Because invaders usually come because they want to rob, pillage, rape, overthrow…”

Ní Chonaill: “I beg…If you want to use that kind of language, go right ahead.”

Duffy: “But what do invaders do?”

Ní Chonaill: “Invaders are people who say, effectively, I’m coming into your country whether you like it or not.”

Duffy: “To do what? To do what?”

Ní Chonaill: “To be here.”

Duffy: “In your house?”

Ní Chonaill: “In our country.”

Duffy: “In your house?”

Ní Chonaill: “In our country which is our communal home. Are you trying to say that the country doesn’t have the right to say who comes into the country?”

Duffy: “Of course it does, of course it does.”

Ní Chonaill: “Well that’s all I’m talking about.”

Duffy: “I’m just saying…I’m trying to get a glimpse, cause you’re coming across with phrases like ‘invader’, I’m trying to get a glimpse of what you’re saying, what you actually think of Ali and people like it.”

Ní Chonaill: “Well, obviously, I don’t know any circumstances, what I do know…”

Duffy: “Well, we heard them, we heard them yesterday, directly from his own mouth.”

Ní Chonaill: “No, no, no. Excuse me, Joe. Excuse me Joe. We never on what basis Ali asked for asylum. He came in 2006, when Syria was…”

Duffy: “Because he wanted to get out of Syria.”

Liveline (RTÉ)

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