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This morning.

Buswells Hotel, Dublin.

Artist Robert Ballagh (left), and James Connolly‘s great grandson, James Connolly Heron (right), presenting Stephen Rea, with a Jim Fitzpatrick limited edition print of the Scotland-born socialist martry as part of ‘Reclaim the Vision of 1916’.

Reclaim the Vision of 1916 is a group of artists, academics, trade unionists, community activists, journalists and other interested citizens who believe Ireland can be “reinvigorated by the ideals of the signatories of the Proclamation”.

Also that there can be no “equivalence between those who died in the struggle to create an Irish Republic and those who perished in defence of the British Empire”.

Uh oh.

FIGHT!

(Rollingnews.ie)

25 thoughts on “James By Jim

  1. MoyestWithExcitement

    That’s a 1916 celebration I could possibly get behind. Nuts to all that flags and nationalist trollocks.

  2. RainyDay

    “equivalence between those who died in the struggle to create an Irish Republic and those who perished in defence of the British Empire”….
    Actually there can…both were poorly organised sacrifices of human lives…
    The men (and women) of 1916 were a bunch of dreamers who didn’t realise what they got themselves into until it was too late. They actually dug trenches in St. Stephens Green!! ….a green surrounded by tall buildings in case you are wondering why this was a bad idea. They also has serious discussions on what European royal they were going to invite over to become our head of state once the British were escorted to the exit, I think they settled on some German prince who had time on his hands.
    The defenders of the Empire at this time would have been over at the first world war, this was the pathetic last death rattle of the old European aristocracy, which solved nothing but set the continent up for the second world war,

      1. RainyDay

        Don’t have a link, our History teacher told us years ago while studying for our Leaving Cert.. He wanted to give us some context on the rising. Prince Joachim I think was Pearse’s choice, who would have been the son of the Kaiser…who obviously would have been great grandson of Queen Victoria. I’m sure there is a record of it somewhere, I may go searching on the old google machine later.

    1. dav

      yes, yes, they should have known their place and acted like good serfs, showing deference to their english masters. Howya John Bruton, looks like the young blueshirts have directed you to Broadsheet!

    2. Deluded

      I did not know that, RainyDay.
      Was there a reason for a replacement monarchy as opposed to an independent republic?

        1. RainyDay

          No probs Deluded…. its always interesting how certain aspects of events in our past can be completely erased from conventional taught history. I’m sure this is far from the only example.
          Padraig Pearse, huge fan of Prince Joachim of Prussia and a man who wanted Ireland to be ruled by the house of Hohenzollern, will rarely be how he is introduced, but it is just as true as Padraig Pearse, revolutionary.
          History is not all that it seems and is often spun to suit modern day requirements of certain sectors of society.

        2. Deluded

          Thank you RainyDay.
          … I gathered, though, from the politics.ie thread that an independent republic was a novel idea for that time and that monarchy was the dominant system for international relations, nor was Pearce alone in such thoughts…

    3. salmon eile

      What’s your point? Is rule by a German princess no effectively the form of administration we have now anyway?

  3. Clampers Outside!

    “equivalence between those who died in the struggle to create an Irish Republic and those who perished in defence of the British Empire”…. OK :/

    But….
    “equivalence between those who died in the struggle to create an Irish Republic and those who perished in freeing of the rest of Europe from Nazism”…. OK, we’re back in the room again?

      1. f_lawless

        have you ever heard of historian Niall Ferguson’s book “The Pity of War”? He makes a compelling case that Britain’s decision to enter the war, turning it from a continental war into a world war was the worst decision ever made by a British government.
        (Copying from the Amazon description here): “In The Pity of War, Niall Ferguson makes a simple and provocative argument: that the human atrocity known as the Great War was entirely England’s fault. Britain, according to Ferguson, entered into war based on naïve assumptions of German aims—and England’s entry into the war transformed a Continental conflict into a world war, which they then badly mishandled, necessitating American involvement. The war was not inevitable, Ferguson argues, but rather the result of the mistaken decisions of individuals who would later claim to have been in the grip of huge impersonal forces”
        According to him “”Had Britain stood aside — even for a matter of weeks — Continental Europe could . . . have been transformed into something not wholly unlike the European Union we know today — but without the massive contraction in British overseas power entailed by the fighting of two world wars.” ..and without the rise of the Nazis and WW2..
        https://www.nytimes.com/books/99/05/09/reviews/990509.09berghat.html

  4. WU

    ‘Artist Robert Ballagh (left), and James Connolly‘s great grandson, James Connolly Heron (right), presenting Stephen Rea, with a Jim Fitzpatrick limited edition print of the Scotland-born socialist martry as part of ‘Reclaim the Vision of 1916.’
    Too many people involved in this sentence.

  5. Jake38

    I think the difference was that the First World War made sure we all didn’t have to speak German, whereas the Rising was to ensure we didn’t all end up speaking English…oh, hang on…

  6. Oh Dear

    Stephen Rea, ex-husband of Dolours Price, convicted IRA bomber who claimed to have driven Jean McConville to her death?

    He can shove his ‘vision’ of Ireland and 1916, thanks.

    1. Neilo

      Met the late Ms Price in a restaurant a number of years ago – leaned over and said “Grub’s a wee bit better here than Armagh Jail, isn’t it”. Reader, I scarpered outta the joint. True story.

  7. salmon eile

    It’s a little blinkered to juxtapose the so-called blood sacrifice of 1916 with the mercenaries who fought in WWI alright but even more myopic to purposely call attention to why you don’t consider them equivalent

  8. Truth in the News

    Those who faught and died for Irish Freedom in 1916 made a stand against an
    empire and inspired all classes and peoples to assert their right to be free
    To attempt now 100 years later to create the illusion that those to died in droves
    from Ireland on the fields of France and Belguim were fighting for our freedom
    is nothing short of treason, those who recruited and in the latter stages tried
    to conscript the men and youth of Ireland to be used as cannon fooder are guilty
    of war crimes, and from among those class came the Officer Class who thought
    they could wipe out the people of 1916.
    Has the stage of revisionism been reached that medals and gongs will be awarded
    by an Irish Government to the long deceased members of the Officer Class, the
    Cario Gang and indeed the Black and Tans who tried in vain to quell the fight for
    Independence.

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