Tonight.

At 7pm.

At the Projects Arts Centre in Temple Bar, Dublin.

Waking The Media – a forum where women’s experiences in the Irish media industry will be discussed.

Writer, director, performer and activist Grace Dyas  will be speaking at the event.

Via its Facebook page:

Right now, we’re witnessing a transformative moment regarding women’s negative experiences in the workplace, particularly in the areas of film, television, theatre, and elsewhere.

Assault, harassment, abuse, bullying, and generally unacceptable behaviour towards women is being called out, as well as the structural misogyny and sexism in industries that inevitably make people’s working lives more difficult than they should be.

Waking The Media is an open forum for women who work in the media industry to talk about their experiences, and to begin to discuss ideas and strategies for improving the working lives and representation of women in our industry.

On the night, we’ll hear from women who have spearheaded changes in their industries such as Lian Bell, who kickstarted the #WakingTheFeminists movement. We’ll also talk about our own experiences and ideas, and most importantly, listen to others.

This event is open to those who work in any facet of the media. All are welcome!

The event is free but seats are limited.

Those wishing to attend are asked to register by emailing wakingthemedia@gmail.com

Waking The Media (Facebook)

Related: Waking The Media (Una Mullally, Medium)

7 thoughts on “Free Tonight?

    1. SOMK

      No one’s forcing you to go Mr. Crow, let alone stir and even if they did, bit of a silly reason to invoke Christ, the dead son of the one true god I mean, buy and eat a light snack, roll a cigarette, listen to a whale song, spend an extra five minutes in the lavatory with a sudoko puzzle, all of which reasonably constituent “a break”, none of which require the intervention of super natural entities/millenia dead Judean cult leader, pretty sure he spent three days on a cross dying for your sins, not your particular irritation over a hashtag associated an event held 2,000 years later 2,500 miles away that you’d never go to anyway.

  1. Kim Cardassian

    Ah here, tell us what conclusion it comes to. Or maybe you didn’t listen to it yourself and hope one of us will.

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