‘Under The Cosh’

at

Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe

Relax.

It’s only the entire Irish economic model at stake.

Government sources said Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe would “dig his heels in” at next week’s meeting, though senior figures acknowledged that Ireland was “under the cosh” on the issue.

Dublin fears that if the tax goes ahead it would establish a precedent which would in time undermine Irish tax sovereignty and severely undercut the Irish economic model of attracting foreign direct investment.

….Documents prepared by the commission in advance of the meeting leave little doubt about the importance that Brussels attaches to the issue. It says that the commission is determined to ensure “fair taxation” of the digital economy, with the current regime seen as “inadequate’.

Good times.

Pressure mounts on Ireland to accept EU digital tax (Irish Times)

Rollingnews

31 thoughts on “‘Under The Cosh’

    1. Increasing Displacement

      Trollollolloll

      Maybe we should join a country that has lost face, territory and power consistently for past century?

      Yeah no thanks

      1. Ollie Cromwell

        You mean the one where hundreds of thousands of Irish people have emigrated to over that century ?
        Taxi for Increasing Displacement.

  1. scottser

    bring it on, i say. ireland’s model of attracting FDI just creates tax havens for big corporations, it’s no harm clawing back a few quid.
    btw, any news on the google walkouts?

  2. dav

    Irelands corporate tax model allows tax avoidance on a huge scale.
    We are allowing corporate scum to squirrel billions away from the public coffers of a number of countries.
    We should be ashamed of this and welcome the EU forcing us to clean up our act.

      1. Daisy Chainsaw

        There are other jobs where the employers actually pay their fair way. Why not look for work with an ethical company?

        1. Increasing Displacement

          Please list where 250,000+ people employed in multinationals (that are here, in part, for the favourable taxation) will work if your utopian ethical company idea is a goer…

          1. Daisy Chainsaw

            They’re go-getters. They’ll find something, I’m sure.

            And there’s always the civil service…

          2. Increasing Displacement

            30% plus in manufacturing…
            No chance of anything outside of multinationals.

            The 40%+ in financial can go fornicate themselves
            They are nothing but an inefficiency

          3. Dr.Fart MD

            250k is a wildly massaged figure. regards tax, if the gov. just collected the agreed 12.5% tax we’d have enough to fix a lot of national problems. I don’t get why they think it’s totally fine to only collect 0.2% and then have a fit when pulled up on it and say “they create emplyment” .. well go down to the google offices and count on one hand the amount of irish staff. you included, buddy.

  3. giggidygoo

    Daffy, Varadkar, Kenny and their EU bootboys, Hogan and Hayes, and Calamity Jane McGuinness have already sold out this country to Merkel et al. It’s the optics they are working on now, on how they’re going to produce it it to us.

    1. Ollie Cromwell

      You’ve only just realised this ?
      Watch how the pace will pick up on this after March 29th next year.
      The endgame of the EU is total control of every country’s tax regime by unelected officials.
      A United States Of Europe.
      Lisbon 2 was the moment Ireland sold its soul and the bailout was the price it paid.
      You’ve been duped time and again and still come back for more punishment.

      1. giggidygoo

        I’ve known it for years at this stage. Much as you tend to wind me and others up here, you do write a lot of truth about Ireland. Your takes on Brexit though do not stack up – if you believe them yourself, then you’re in for a nasty surprise if Brexit does occur.

        1. Ollie Cromwell

          The fact is none of us know at this stage because no deal has been done and we don’t know what the UK’s future trading arrangements with the EU will be.
          I’ve always said there’ll be short-term disruption but Blighty is big enough and strong enough to overcome it – certainly a lot of foreign companies and countries think so too given the massive ongoing inward investment.
          On here I like to question and poke with a stick the smug and ludicrous idea that some people have that the EU has Ireland’s best interests at heart.
          And that the country is being played by the EU over the Brexit negotiations.
          I do it to see how quickly latent anti-British racism is stirred up and usually it doesn’t take very long.

          1. Hansel

            Ollie, you’re in good company, most of my friends, colleagues and family in the UK think along similar lines to you: that “the UK can overcome”.

            I don’t know how many Suez’s it will take to shake that colonial complex, but let me reassure you this: since I believe it’s going to drag many of the rest of us down the toilet, I take no joy in the idea that the UK will be damaged by Brexit, I only hope it will be the last Suez.

          1. Brother Barnabas

            there’s not much difference between being on a zero hour contract and being unemployed

            not that the likes of farage or johnson or rees-mogg give a monkeys about that

          2. Ollie Cromwell

            Zero hours contracts account for less than 5% of the workforce in the UK and the figure is declining.
            Your stupidity knows no bounds.

  4. Zaccone

    The Irish tax haven model has worked wonderfully for us for 25 odd years, but its got to come to an end some time. Large tech firms are drastically underpaying tax, largely thanks to the help of countries like Ireland. Sooner or later they’re going to have to start paying an appropriate amount of tax. Its going to be impossible both morally and politically to hold this back for much longer.

    The hope is just that Ireland will have done enough by that stage to make it worthwhile for tech firms to stay here – “hub status”, highly educated workforce, English speaking etc.

    1. Hansel

      From what I’ve seen in the multinationals I work with, we haven’t done near enough.

      My hope’s on agricultural efficiency as our future USP.

      1. Otis Blue

        Irish agricultural efficiency Vs growing imperative for climate friendly farming X Brexit = a big problem.

  5. ReproButina

    Ireland’s reluctance to introduce such a tax is on the grounds that companies could move to the UK where there is no digital sales tax and no onus, post Sasamach, to introduce one. Now that the UK have announced their intention to introduce a digital sales tax that reason vanishes.

  6. Jake38

    Great idea.
    Let’s all return to the economic model of growing potatoes that worked so well in the past.

  7. Joe

    The usual Fianna Fail Gael lies and propaganda. Anything to avoid big business paying a fair share of tax . The usual nonsense will be puked by FFG about jobs going elsewhere if multinationals are asked to pay tax. The sleazy politicians screwing the average worker for tax,USC etc whilst allowing untaxed, vast sums of FDI profits flow out of the country should be taken out and hung on the Leinster house lawn. A tiny taxed portion of the mega profits would go a long way in cutting the death rates on trolleys in the health service. But hey! when it comes to big business or ordinary tax payers under Fianna Fail Gael, you can bet your bottom dollar its the average tax payer that will be screwed.

    Some 13 of Ireland’s top 100 companies pay an effective rate of tax of just 1 per cent, the latest Comptroller and Auditor General (C&AG) report has found.
    https://www.irishtimes.com/business/economy/several-of-ireland-s-top-companies-pay-as-little-as-1-in-tax-1.3238360

    1. Cian

      I agree that multinationals should pay their fair share of taxes (somewhere).
      Any multinationals that are generating money in Ireland should pay Irish taxes on that money.

      However, Ireland isn’t “missing out” on billions of taxes. If Ireland were to charge the full 12.5% tax then the billions that are diverted to Ireland (because we are low tax) would be diverted elsewhere. 1% of billions is better than 12.5% of millions.

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