From top: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s letter confirming prorogation (discontinuing without dissolving) of Parliament; Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II

This morning.

Brexit latest news: Queen will be asked to suspend parliament today (BBC)

Meanwhile.

Oh.

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36 thoughts on “Suspenseful

  1. eoin

    The “Mother of parliaments” is being shut down by an unelected prime minister (properly elected by 92,153 members of the Tory party but you know what I mean), meaning the majority of elected MPs are unable to debate or pass laws.

    Johnson has filled his Cabinet with the shadiest shower imaginable, leakers, sleazers, pocket-liners, and he only survives thanks to the votes of the 10 DUP members (sleazers, pocket-liners, Adam-not-Stevers, gambling law opposers).

    Maybe, those Hong Kong protesters can fly over for “pro democracy” marches in Westminster.

    1. eoin

      Also, the recent Establishment press-bashing of the royals now makes sense, the US-sourced Andrew videos, the US-sourced dirt on Prince Charles’s best friend Louis Mountbatten and the stuff about Meghan and Harry. If the Queen doesn’t do what Boris wants, we’ll be hearing from Murdoch and Harmsworth about what the footman saw, pretty damned quick [in my imagination, it involves pheasant blood, corgis and intimate acts].

      Over to you Queenie (or else!)

      1. V

        Over to you Corbyn

        Actually is there anything stopping Mrs Windsor asking Jeremy Corbyn to form a Government?

        1. eoin

          Just you remember Liz, monarchy isn’t guaranteed for life!

          Lancaster
          York
          Tudor
          Stuart
          Orange
          Hanover
          Saxe-Coburg (or “Windsor” as it was renamed because Jerry wasn’t so popular during the Great War)
          Johnson, King Boris I and his latest consort, HRH Carrie S

          1. eoin

            1pm, Jeremy Corbyn has written to the Queen. Letter not yet released, but he’s likely to have asked her to refuse the request to suspend parliament. That’ll put Liz in a tough spot. And if she does decide to stop Bojo’s charade, she can expect to reap a whirlwind of negative press coverage attacking the very institution of the monarchy.

            I’d say this was popcorn time except this is affecting real lives in the UK, and will affect us in due course.

          2. V

            At this stage of her life
            Why would she be __sed about bad press

            I know tis all about duty and the Crown and the Monarchy with this family
            But if she is the leader she deserves to be remembered as
            She would either tell Boris to get back to work
            In fairness
            He asked for the gig so effin’ well lead the Commons with debate and reasoned arguement in defence of the Democratic choice the people made
            So get on with it
            Or get off the pot like

            Or abdicate and let Charles sort it
            I reckon he’s his own man
            And wouldn’t think twice about getting an election called

            At least with a fresh General Election
            The current opinion of the people can be captured

            At this stage they haven’t a notion who is what
            And where is when

            I’m telling ye
            Boris is scared sh1___ss of being PM post Brexit
            And leading a post Brexit UK

    1. Batty Brennan

      Serious question for those who understand the arcane world of the British “unwritten” constitution: Can Elizabeth Windsor refuse to prorogue parliament? Does she have a constitutional duty to do so? Does the monarch have any *actual* power at all?

      Brexit. The gift that just won’t stop giving.

        1. scottser

          if you were a monarch, would you not want to give the order ‘off with his head’? i mean, just once?

          1. milk teeth

            OK yet another constitutional crisis – like russian dolls of constitutional crisises(crises? crisi??)

      1. Formerly known as @ireland.com

        As I know you are all aware, the Queen was part of a constitutional crisis in Australia, in 1975.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1975_Australian_constitutional_crisis

        The short version is that the Queen’s representative in Oz, the Governor-General asked her to end the government of the lawfully elected Labor Government. She did it and there was an election. The LNP won (similar to the Tories). It is an outrage.

        So, she has form.

      2. Cian

        Perhaps she could agree to close the current session, but insist the new session starts the following day.

        1. Steph Pinker

          ‘Perhaps’? As opposed to citations?

          Are you not feeling well, Cian? In fairness, yourself and Rob_G, et al., must be tired after your FG (taxpayers) holidays with a few weeks still remaining to create some imaginary statistics, top up your tan, eat some foreign food, drink some wine etc…

          … although, maybe the foreign stuff doesn’t agree with you? Notwithstanding the above, I’d stay away from really expensive Irish hotels with alcohol and swings if I were ye.

          1. Rob_G

            I’m continually delighted with the exciting fantasy life that several BS commenters have built for me – wuppee.

    1. Milk teeth

      In the UK? It would be illigal. They have the harshest anti stike laws of any developed democracy.

      1. Rob_G

        “They have the harshest anti stike laws of any developed democracy.”

        – which laws, specifically, are you referring to? There are (legal) strikes in the UK quite frequently.

  2. ivan

    Well I don’t know about the rest of you, but I’m pretty sure that entering a bilateral agreement with this very same British Government at the expense of our relations with the rest of the EU certainly strikes me as the sensible thing to do…

    Absolutely no chance of them trying to shaft us. No sir. Absolutely not.

  3. Hector Ramirez

    If QE was bitter, she’d allow Johnson to carry on. ‘Why are we paying for a useless royal family’, that are regular occurrence across the water, opinions would come home to roost.

  4. scundered

    So he’s behaving in an undemocratic manner in order to stop the rest of them acting in an undemocratic manner, what a complete and utter mess.

    1. Steph Pinker

      More to the point, it’s a very cynical and devious move to make; it proves that BJ has no respect or understanding of democracy; he wants his 15 minutes of fame and that’s all that matters.

      Did I mention that he also has a temper? And he likes to take it out on others, be it psychologically, emotionally or physically?

      He’s a misantrope like Trump – an egoistical, sociopathic narcissist who feeds off himself because he doesn’t need anyone else to survive; life is a gamble to him irrespective of the outcome, even at the expense of others.

  5. scottser

    if the intention for northern ireland under the GFA was to have a region as autonomous as possible, recognising the dual sovereignty of its citizens. the practical solution was to have a functioning stormont assembly acting in the interests of all it represents. DUP and SF need to be made to go back to the power sharing structures; leaning on us and the UK all the time is teaching them nothing about good governance.
    a functioning executive up there is the key to this mess. you wouldn’t need a backstop arrangement in the north could set and collect its own tariffs in a border arrangement with us.

  6. Otis Blue

    Sinn Fein taking it’s seven seats in the HOC would make for a delicious “Black Swan” event.

    Extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures.

    1. Steph Pinker

      Hahahaha, poor Hugh, he could, at the very least have been self-deprecating and chosen his words more carefully if he wanted to slag BJ off – such as ‘Two Weeks Notice’; ‘Impromptu’; ‘Extreme Measures’ or even ‘Sense and Sensibility’?

      … or, The Rewrite (as opposed to the WA?)

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