Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe

This Morning/afternoon.

Via RTE:

“Intense discussions” on how the country will exit Level 5 restrictions are “necessary” and are under way, the Finance Minister has said, describing it as a “decision of magnitude”.

Paschal Donohoe said the Government is hearing assessments from NPHET, adding it is important to acknowledge that the country is making progress on beating the virus.

“If you are looking at all indicators where we were a few weeks ago we are in a better place but not as good a place as we would like to be,” Mr Donohoe stated.

Intense.

‘Intense discussions’ on exiting Level 5 under way – Donohoe (RTÉ)

RollingNews

Meanwhile…

In fairness.

HOWEVER…

…He walked this back last Monday.

FIGHT!

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22 thoughts on “Bye, Five

  1. Cian

    “Prime Minister”?
    Who is Cummins’ target audience?

    France, Belgium, Italy, UK (all hit badly in the first wave) are all looking at a second wave of deaths that are at 50-75% of their first wave. (and the second wave isn’t over – it may rise further)

    Daily deaths (7-day average) April, vs this week:
    – Italy was 817, now 612 [75%]
    – Belgium was 286, now 204 [70%]
    – France was 975, now 614 [63%]
    – UK was 941, now 435 [46%]

    All these countries had large numbers of excess deaths in April/May there is good reason to think that this second wave will also result in excess deaths.

    Ireland second wave has been cut – possible reason is that we locked down earlier than these countries?

    Reply
    1. Micko

      Not helpful to compare countries to help prove your point. Too many variables.

      That game can be played the other way too. For example- Singapore vs Ireland

      Similar population size in both countries, a similar number of cases and spread. Singapore is much more densely populated.

      Yet only 28 dead in Singapore.

      Anyway, I don’t actually expect you to answer as there are too many variables.

      We need to focus on what is happening here, not what MIGHT happen. Just because other European countries are in the poo, doesn’t mean we will be.

      Stop looking elsewhere to what everyone else is doing – that’s the mistake our government keeps making.

      Reply
      1. Cian

        All those countries (like Ireland) had a bad 1st wave – which is why I choose them.

        Ireland’s numbers (cases/hospitalisations/ICU) were rising through Sept and Oct (like those countries I mentioned). But our numbers peaked late October.

        For balance, Sweden had a terrible 1st wave and seems to be doing better that average now.

        Reply
        1. Micko

          Yeah, but you can’t provide data for one way and then ignore conflicting data like Singapore.
          Their population density is 8358 per sqKM.

          8358 to our 72 per sqKM. They’re crammed in like sardines compared to us and they still faired better.

          Again too many variables. Stop looking elsewhere Cian.

          As long as our county keeps bloody ‘cogging’ off our neighbours unable to make a decision of our own – we’re fecked.

          Reply
          1. Cian

            Why not?
            Ireland’s 1st wave was similar to the countries I mentioned, but different to Singapore.
            We had a similar swell of number in Sept/Oct. Their swell continued into a second wave, ours hasn’t.

          2. SOQ

            Cian only looks elsewhere when there is no scaremongering to be done with Ireland’s data..

            We don’t have a second wave and the spike was already on a downward turn before- so attributing it to lockdown is bullpoo.

            It is nearly like it does its own thing regardless- imagine that?

        2. Harry

          Sweden is having a bad second wave
          https://www.kogonuso.com/second-wave-same-strategy-swedish-covid-19-czar-defiant-despite-surge/

          “Sweden remains steadfast in its strategy of voluntary measures and no lockdowns, the architect of its unorthodox COVID-19 response said on Friday, as the country battles a growing second wave of a disease that has now killed more than 6,000 Swedes.

          The Nordic nation of 10 million people, whose soft-touch approach to combating the virus has drawn worldwide attention – and harsh domestic criticism from some – has seen a surge in the number of cases, hospitalisations and deaths in recent weeks.

          At 5,990, the number of new cases reported on Friday was the highest since the start of the pandemic. A further 42 deaths were also recorded, the most for around three months.

          While Sweden’s death rate per capita is lower than in countries such as Spain and Britain, it is more than 10 times higher than neighbouring Norway and almost five times higher than in Denmark.”

          Reply
    1. ReproBertie

      The health services are better prepared for Covid patients than they were back in March/April. Treatments have improved resulting in an increased survival rate.

      Reply
          1. frank

            No, no, you’re right Bertie. The heath services are right on top of their game now!! and as for the treatments. Dexamethasone? That would bring Dracula back to life, for a week or two anyway. They use it in combination with cancer medications. I’d imagine you could give Dex to any malady and the person would rally. Temporarily

          2. ReproBertie

            Silly me. Clearly 9 months dealing with a new virus and getting information on treatments from around the world won’t have had any impact on the treatments being used in Ireland. .

    2. Micko

      Indeed Frank

      In fact of the 2010 poor unfortunates who died in Ireland, 1118 didn’t even go to the hospital. That’s 56%

      Of that remaining 892 that did go to the hospital, 761 didn’t go into ICU.

      Who doesn’t go to the hospital or get put into ICU if they have a chance of making it?

      Unfortunately very old sick people.

      So, either we have a lot of folks dropping dead in the streets and not making it to the hospital or they were all in Nursing homes and when they DID go to the hospital, doctors made the decision not to place them in ICU as their chances of survival were tiny.

      Data here – Page: 11 Table: 7
      https://www.hpsc.ie/a-z/respiratory/coronavirus/novelcoronavirus/casesinireland/epidemiologyofcovid-19inireland/COVID-19%20Daily%20epidemiology%20report%20(NPHET)_20201119_website.pdf

      Reply
      1. frank

        It’s as plain as the nose on your face Micko but the unvarnished truth just doesn’t sit with the ‘narrative’ that’s being spun.

        Reply
        1. Micko

          Yup – and what a fine nose it is Frank (Take my word for it… ;P )

          131 of 2010 people who died in hospital were deemed to have a chance of survival and were transferred to ICU.

          That’s 6.5%… and ye know the bigger number of deaths that occur outside of ICU’s the smaller that percentage will get.

          So, imagine how incompetent the government and the HSE will look when that percentage is 1% or 2%

          Reply
  2. Shitferbrains

    So it’s a hanging offence to pose for a photograph but ok to act the bollocks pretending to be ” one of the people ” by sitting beside the driver ?

    Reply
  3. Jimmy TwoShoes

    Irelands Prime Minister? What does that make Martin? We’re supposed to listen to this Cummins lad because “he knows data” and he doesn’t even know who the Taoiseach is?

    Reply
    1. SOQ

      Half of Ivor’s audience is English these days and they wouldn’t know what v means.

      Is that all you have to criticize him on?

      Reply
      1. Jimmy TwoShoes

        If you would like to go back there and give it another read, I didn’t criticise him for using the Queens’…

        Reply

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