Then Minister for Health Micheál Martin (second left) in Maguires, Baggot Street, Dublin 2 on March 29, 2004

Where are your masks?

G’wan the nanny state.

*wheeze*

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23 thoughts on “Fag End

  1. Cú Chulainn

    In fairness it was a bold move and it worked and we are all better off for it. He got the Repeal vote right as well. That’s two good decisions he made.

    Reply
  2. bisted

    …just as Mehole got credit for the smoking ban initiative…it was social solidarity that really made it a success…like banning smokey coal, plastic bag use, driving on the left, measures separating church and state…social solidarity will be the thing that defeats coronavirus, despite government…

    Reply
      1. ce

        +1 The absolute onslaught from lobbyists and the public (similar with Harney and smog) during this, it was amazing it got through so fast. Don’t like Martin’s or Harney’s politics, but yep credit were credit is due

        Reply
      2. bisted

        …he will be forever associated with the smoking ban…as will Mary Harney with smokeless coal and plastic bags…as will bungling Boris with delivering Brexit and defeating coronavirus in the UK…but none of these things would have happened without solidarity…just as is happening now…despite Mehole and Stephen…despite Golfgate and the Beacon…remember the water charges and all the people who thought that was a great idea?

        Reply
        1. ce

          “but none of these things would have happened without solidarity” and a whole lot of moaning from a whole lot of non-solidarity on those two particular issues.

          Water charges, whole different thing

          Reply
        2. Rob_G

          If it was social solidarity that deserves all the credit, why did everyone not just spontaneously stop these destructive behaviours, instead of waiting for the government to compel them to do so?

          Reply
    1. Rob_G

      If it was social solidarity that deserves all the credit, why did everyone not just spontaneously stop these destructive behaviours, instead of waiting for the government to compel them to do so?

      Reply
        1. bisted

          …funny…I always thought that that was what they were paid for…lawmakers…the pandemic has just confirmed what people believe…that the lawmakers are most likely to be the lawbreakers on the simple expedient that they are above the law…

          Reply
          1. bisted

            …you should lash off one of your famous complaints to the moderators Bog_R…you seem to be well connected…got your wink wink vaccination yet?

  3. Micko

    I was playing a late gig that night in town.

    Very odd to be able to smoke on stage and then once the clock hit the hour we couldn’t anymore.

    Our coolness was destroyed – we could no longer put fags in our headstocks ;)

    Reply
    1. ce

      Definitely strange time for music, the first six moths or so especially – suddenly support bands had crowds and then everybody went out for a fag leaving surprisingly spacious headlining spots… was on both sides of that coin!

      Weird to be in Portugal or Greece in a bar and everybody …. at least last year… still puffing away!

      Reply
  4. Janet, chatty mammy

    I used to work a packed dive in the red light district in Paris, there’s be a visible cloud of smoke floating from people’s heads up to the ceiling, I was fecking delighted when it came in, no more ashtrays used as weapons, random cigarette burns from stupid people waving them about across the bar, no more hair stinking at the end of a night, I didn’t smoke and yet I hocked up black crap for weeks after as my lungs cleared from the passive smoke, twas grim the smoking in bars

    Reply
  5. Diddy

    Public support me eye. This was highly divisive especially among the drinking classes. The reason it was supported was because it became the law!

    Something has been lost mind you. A gang sitting together chatting , drinking ,in the moment. Before long phones would intrude and disturb everything to a really woeful extent that you see today.

    Reply
      1. bisted

        …hah…an awful memory from the time…the sickly smell from the carpet in the Long Hall…probably always there but the smoke had masked it…ugh…

        Reply
  6. dav

    Anyone remember “Death” ciggies from the mid 1990’s?
    Black Box, not sure if there was a Skull on it and the same tar/nicotine ratio as B&H. I always remember there was another version of them as well “Death Lights”.

    Reply
      1. dav

        They were in the ciggies machine in “Fibbers” on O’Connell st and I do recall Gay Byrne gave them a 5min slot on The late late.

        Reply

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