Tag Archives: Win Nick’s PC Voucher

The votes are in.

Last week, with a Currys PC World voucher worth €20 on offer, I asked you to name your favourite song of this millennium (2000-2021).

You answered in your dozens.

But there could be only one winner.

Third Place:

Song For Zula by Phosphorescent

Jonboy writes:

“A beautiful, bittersweet, ballad that captures the un-romance of a breaking relationship.

“Saw him in Whelan’s back around 2013 when he was touring this album (Muchacho – give it a listen, it’s incredible) and it was every bit as good in person.”

Runner-up:

Oblivion by Grimes

Capernosity And Function writes:

“I first heard this as the music to an Eircom ad many moons ago. I never, never get tired of playing this; surely, that is the mark of a song that has entered your consciousness in a good way. I love the intro, the fey, wispy vocals that deal with a subject darker than the melody implies.

“I often think the best songs are constructed like that. Grimes is now viewed through the prism of her relationship with Evil Genius/ World Saviour (delete as appropriate) Elon Musk. This song is from a time when her lo-fi, DIY production ethic was fully intact, and it worked.”

Winner:

Alexandra Leaving by Leonard Cohen

Eug writes:

“I’ve listened to Leonard Cohen since my teens saw him twice in the stadium in the 80’s and reborn in Royal Hospital in 2008 and every time he visited after that.

“Even though she sleeps upon your satin
Even though she wakes you with a kiss”

Leonard at his best and reborn in the 21st Century. Sharon Robinson got him to sing in a lower octave and between them they took “The God Abandons Antony” written in 1911 by the poet Constantine P. Cavafy and transformed into Alexandra Leaving.

“Do not choose a coward’s explanation
That hides behind the cause and the effect”

To me it speaks of love, live and it’s inevitable end and acceptance.

“Say goodbye to Alexandra leaving
Then say goodbye to Alexandra lost”

Nick says: Thanks all.

Last week: Win Nick’s PC Voucher

Thank Frances it’s Friday.

That can only mean one thing: another music competition.

This week, I want to know: What’s your favourite song of this millennium? So, from 2000-2021.

Reply below to be in with a chance of winning a coveted Currys PC World voucher worth €20.

Here’s mine.

The winner will be chosen by my chef.

Please include video links if possible.

Lines close at Saturday 11am.

Nick says: Good luck!

Earlier: Last week’s winner here.

Thank Frida it’s Friday.

That can only mean one thing: it’s time for another music competition to get you through the weekend.

This week I want to know: What’s your favourite song by a Scandinavian artist?

Here’s mine.

Reply below to be in with a chance of winning a prized €20 voucher redeemable at Currys PC World.

The winner will be chosen by my laptop repair man.

Please include video links if possible.

Lines MUST close Saturday 11am.

Nick says: Good luck!

Earlier: Last week’s winner

Currys PC World

Thank Fionnuala it’s Friday.

And technically it’s Springtime too (just stay away from the weather forecasts).

Which brings us to the theme of this week’s music competition: What’s your favourite song whose title or lyrics contain a reference to Spring?

Here’s mine.

Reply below to be in with a chance of winning a splendid €20 gift voucher redeemable at  Currys PC World.

The winner will be chosen by my window cleaner.

Lines MUST close at 10pm.

Nick says: Good luck!

Currys PC World


The votes are in.

Many thanks to everyone who entered last Friday’s music competition, even if an alarming number of you don’t appear to know the difference between a city and a country!

A shout out to ‘Ronnie’, who introduced us to the brilliant Beirut song and also to Brother and his very moving Iberian tale.

The winning entry is described in the comments below the YouTube video as “the most powerful anti-war song ever written”. I can’t disagree. It has a deep personal resonance for me as someone who had two grandfathers who both somehow survived the madness of the Great War. And the accompanying video is brilliantly edited.

So a worthy winner, Papi.

Third Place:

Postcards from Italy by Beirut

Ronnie writes:

“Beautiful, nostalgic, sing out out loud at the top of your voice. Great horn section and in these Covid times – a reminder of “the times we had” (opening line). Brilliant. I defy you not to like it.”

Runner-up:

Spanish Bombs by The Clash

Brother Barnabas writes:

“I’ve an attachment for lots of reasons to Andalucia – not least because I love the people. One of my favourites is an elderly neighbour called Paco. Chews his tobacco and doesn’t say much but, if you’re lucky, has the most knee-trembling stories of his time in the Spanish Civil War – and the bullet-hole scars in his belly to prove it.

“Last time I saw him, I was saying goodbye. We went for a drink. Apropos nothing, he borrowed a guitar from behind the bar and sang this – word perfect, though he doesn’t speak a word of English. Still haven’t figured out why but, listening to it, I couldn’t stop the tears.”

Winner:

The Green Fields of France by The Fureys & Davey Arthur

Papi writes:

“A song I think we’ve all learned through osmosis, at home, in pubs, everywhere a few drinks may have been had, but there’s always one who knows all the words, and everyone can join in.”

Nick says: Thanks all.

Last week: Win Nick’s PC Voucher