Tag Archives: Ireland

Balls.ie tweetz:

Peter O’Mahony got the goods delivered to Japan.

Ireland are back on track….

Meanwhile…

…a bonus-point win for Joe Schmidt’s men against Samoa on Saturday will seal a place in the quarter-finals.

After that they can just sit back and relax in complete comfort knowing that they are assured of facing either the current and back-to-back World Cup winners or the Rugby Championship title holders.

Pool A permutations: What Ireland need to progress (RTE)

Govt preparing services for Hurricane Lorenzo (RTÉ)

On Thursday.

Ireland will play Russia at the Kobe Misaki Stadium in Kobe City, Japan, in the Rugby World Cup with kick-off taking place at 11.15am Irish time.

Further to this…

CEO of Vodafone Anne O’Leary tweetz:

On Thursday [Ireland’s rugby team] take on Russia during office hours. Vodafone employees are getting 2 hours off to watch it. Canterbury of New Zealand, Aer Lingus & Diageo Ireland, I challenge you to do the same and nominate 3 other businesses. Here’s a note from Joe [above] to help!

*Pass it on*.

UPDATE:

Oh.

Ireland V Russia

Carlow Weather tweetz:

“Latest [Hurricane Lorenzo] update: The National Hurricane Center track forecast has been adjusted a little to the left to come into better agreement with the latest consensus aids. Although the spread in the models is not as large as it was yesterday, the forecast beyond 48 hours is still of low confidence.”

Met Éireann ‘closely monitoring’ Hurricane Lorenzo (RTE)

Top pic: National Hurricane Center

UPDATE:

Data Protection Commissioner Helen Dixon; Labour TD Alan Kelly

This morning.

The Data Protection Commissioner Helen Dixon is fielding many questions about the Public Services Card at a meeting of the Public Accounts Committee.

But separate to the Public Services Card, and in response to a question from Labour TD Alan Kelly, Ms Dixon told the committee that, in terms of the supervision and enforcement of data protection law, Irish taxpayers will incur costs for having multi-nationals headquartered in Ireland.

Ms Dixon said:

“Once the Irish DPC [Data Protection Commissioner] starts administering fines and sanctions on companies, there has been a debate about whether all of that goes to the Irish Exchequer and whether that isn’t shared across the EU member states.

“At the moment, it’s our understanding that it goes to the Irish Exchequer.

“So, already, there’s an opposite debate to the question you’re opening up which is that: well is that fair? If Ireland supervises most of these big tech companies and there are infringements and fines, does Ireland get to keep the fines? So that’s an open question that’s ben raised a number of times.

“In relation to the costs, I think it’s well possible that the Irish taxpayer will end up, by virtue of these companies being headquartered here, incurring costs.

“The Irish taxpayer has incurred costs already in relation to the case that you referenced that’s before the Court of Justice at the European Union on transfers of data because it arose from a complaint by Max Schrems against Facebook Ireland.

“Facebook Ireland being located here means that we are responsible.

“However, under this Co-operation and Consistency Mechanism that operates around the one-stop shop in the EU now, if there’s a dispute in relation to the findings that I make – so I’ve to circulate a draft decision in relation to any of these cases that concern multi-nationals to my fellow EU Data Protection authorities.

“And if ultimately they have a different view, that I can’t reconcile into my findings, I institute a dispute resolution mechanism before the European Data Protection Board and it may take over the decision making. And if a company affected by that decision disagrees with it, it takes an annulment action to the Court of Justice of the European Union.

“So, there will be a certain number of cases that may end up being taken out of Ireland’s hands because of disagreement between data protection authorities and the European Data Protection Board will then have to bear the cost for defending those cases before the CJU.

“But, undoubtedly, the effect of having the multi-nationals headquartered in Ireland is going to give rise to costs for Ireland in terms of the supervision and enforcement of data protection law.”

Watch the proceedings live here

Irish New York Times’ journalist Declan Walsh; New York Times

This morning.

Publisher of the New York Times, reports:

“The current [US] administration, however, has retreated from our country’s historical role as a defender of the free press. Seeing that, other countries are targeting journalists with a growing sense of impunity.

… let me tell you a story I’ve never shared publicly before. Two years ago, we got a call from a United States government official warning us of the imminent arrest of a New York Times reporter based in Egypt named Declan Walsh.

…this particular call took a surprising and distressing turn. We learned the official was passing along this warning without the knowledge or permission of the Trump administration.

Rather than trying to stop the Egyptian government or assist the reporter, the official believed, the Trump administration intended to sit on the information and let the arrest be carried out. The official feared being punished for even alerting us to the danger.

Unable to count on our own government to prevent the arrest or help free Declan if he were imprisoned, we turned to his native country, Ireland, for help.

Within an hour, Irish diplomats traveled to his house and safely escorted him to the airport before Egyptian forces could detain him.”

The Growing Threat to Journalism Around the World (AG Sulzberger, The New York Times)

From top: Graphic showing number of empty homes in rural Ireland; figures from Peter McVerry Trust report on rural homelessness

Homeless charity Peter McVerry Trust has launched a new report on rural homelessness.

From the report:

As of April 2019, there were 40,234 mortgages across Ireland in long-term mortgage arrears (two years or more).

According to information published each year by the Central Bank, rural counties have the highest percentage of mortgages in arrears as a percentage of all mortgages.

This has the potential to impact heavily on rural homelessness given the rates of mortgage distress and repossession

In 2018 financial institutions across Ireland repossessed 1,284 homes.

Peter McVerry Trust tweetz:

Homelessness is impacting small towns across Ireland – not just larger urban areas.

Peter McVerry Trust publishes new report on rural homelessness (Peter McVery Trust)

Graph on ‘phantom’ Foreign Direct Investment created by researchers Jannick Damgaard, Thomas Elkjaer, and Niels Johannesen from the University of Copenhagen

A large proportion of the world’s stock of foreign direct investment is “phantom” capital, designed to minimise companies’ tax liabilities rather than financing productive activity, according to research.

Nearly 40 per cent of worldwide FDI – worth a total of $15tn – “passes through empty corporate shells” with “no real business activities”, the study by the IMF and the University of Copenhagen found.

Instead they are a vehicle for financial engineering, “often to minimise multinationals’ global tax bill”, said researchers Jannick Damgaard, Thomas Elkjaer, and Niels Johannesen, who carried out the study.

Nearly two-thirds of Ireland’s inward investment is “phantom”, the IMF study found.

Almost two-thirds of Irish FDI is ‘phantom’ – IMF study (The Irish Times)

For your consideration.

Seventeenth Century Irish/Hibernian map porn.

Via HeritageMaps:

Four maps depicting Ireland in very different shapes – all from the 1690s – by, from top:  Visscher, Nolin, Coronelli and Rossi and published in Amsterdam, Paris, Venetia and Roma.

The Nicolaes Visscher map’s short title is ‘Regnum Hiberniae’ and appears courtesy of [David] Rumsey Maps – hi-res available here.

The Vincenzo Coronelli map’s title is ‘Composite: Parte settentrionale dell’Irlanda. Parte settentrionale dell’Irlanda’. Via Rumsey. Full res here.

The 1690 Jean-Baptiste Nolin map is called ‘Le Royaume D’Irlande Divise en Provinces subivisees en Compte et en Baronies selon les Memoires du Sr. Petty . . . ‘ and appears courtesy of Raremaps. Full version here.

And 1699’s Giovanni Giacomo de Rossi map is called ‘L’Irlanda o vero Hibernia’ in short. Also via Rumsey. Hi-res version here.

HeritageMaps