Take Me To Mass [Updated]

at | 49 Replies

Mullahoran parish in County Cavan

Free Sunday?

Cavan-based?

KN writes:

…any of your readers opposed to restrictions living within 5km of Mullahoran, County Cavan? The parish priest there [Fr PJ Hughes] has bravely promised to celebrate mass on Sunday despite a fine and further threats for holding a service earlier this month. I believe he is within his rights to say mass for his parishioners  and wish other priests would follow his lead. I think anyone who is opposed to lockdowns – whatever your denomination or none – should  go to his mass!

PRAY! Fight!

Previously: Mass Delusion

Meanwhile…

This afternoon.

Leinster House, Dublin 2.

Independent TD for Cork South West Michael Collins (above) along with a coalition of  TDs speaking to media outside Leinster House today, as they call on the Government to ensure that churches are reopened for worship by Easter.

Sasko Lazarov/RollingNews

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49 thoughts on “Take Me To Mass [Updated]

    1. Rugbyfan

      Zero chance. The Rte presenters never let off on golfgate for how many months? The US presidential election got less coverage!

      Reply
  1. Daisy Chainsaw

    Don’t forget to bring some fresh from the banklink notes for the collection. No tapping the card for Jesus here.

    Reply
    1. millie bobby brownie

      We got the ‘Fees Due’ card in the door the other day, the bloody cheek of them. All very pretty and a lovely finish, and straight into the recycling bin it went.

      Reply
      1. GiggidyGoo

        Are they still at that?
        Next thing you’ll be telling us is that the mass is now in english, not latin.

        Reply
        1. GiggidyGoo

          Yes – you get an envelope with ‘Easter Dues’ or the like written on it, and you’re meant to be generous – notes. That’s on top of what you’re meant to give at mass itself (they send the money baskets around twice these days I believe).

          In Germany you pay money directly from your pay packet to support religious outfit you are a member of I think. You can opt out by declaring you’ve no religion.

          Reply
        2. scottser

          the sister in law lived in germany for a while – they have a church tax that comes straight out of your wage which is a bit of a rigmarole to opt out of – you have to formally renounce your membership of the church.

          Reply
      2. Redundant Proofreaders Society

        Are they still at that craic? They used to send their messengers/wafer-givers out door-to-door on a Friday evening back in the day to collect them. And us busy ‘tightening our belts’ with yellow-pack lager and cans of Intervention Beef.

        Reply
    1. Daisy Chainsaw

      Which has brought a few bandwagon jumpers out from under their rocks. How did Peadar Toibin ever fit in with the shinners when he’s outed himself as a complete Ronan Mullen?

      Reply
  2. Andy Pipkin

    My local barman believes he is perfectly with his rights too serve me pints on Sunday!
    Will it happen?

    Reply
  3. newsjustin

    Ultimate conundrum for some people – stick it thru lockdown man vs having to cross the threshold of a church. Will be spinning like a perpetual motion machine.

    Interesting development from the courts this morning- the Govt have two weeks to clarify matters (that’s until after Easter which is handy).

    For what its worth, I’m not in favour of solo runs by anyone and support those showing restraint. Online masses are not an adequate replacement, but there is no Sunday obligation at the moment. It is terrible, but (imho) unavoidable for a bit longer.

    Reply
    1. GiggidyGoo

      I’m surprised that someone hasn’t come up with pre-packed individual communion pieces. The priest could bless them in bulk, and the local shops could then give them out at the checkout.

      Reply
      1. Anton Chigurh

        Like Mass cards. Kite your designated catholic from hell/purgatory/limbo to heaven while scratching your lotto cards. My local SuperValu would be so into the haunted crackers dispensary shtick…

        Reply
        1. GiggidyGoo

          Exactly.
          The priests down my way don’t even sign them – some ‘parish’ helper does it, and the supermarket sells them

          Reply
    2. Cian

      really? The big JC would respectfully disagree with you:

      “And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by others. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward in full.
      But when you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.
      And when you pray, do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words. Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him.”

      Matthew 6:5

      (my emphasis)

      Reply
      1. newsjustin

        Very good. Yes, thats partially why I’m pretty relaxed about the whole ‘no public Masses’ thing.

        But my point is that Online Mass is not a real replacement for in-person Mass. Certainly, many different kinds of prayer can be done anywhere else in the absence of a priest though.

        Reply
  4. Daisy Chainsaw

    Does a priest have to be in the actual presence of bread and wine to transubstantiate them? If parishioners listen to or livestream mass at home, can transubstantiation not take place there too?

    Reply
        1. newsjustin

          “Liturgical norms usually require that all that is to be consecrated be present before the priest on the altar and upon a corporal.”

          There must be both ‘intent’ i.e. bread and wine stored nearby cannot be consecrated accidentally! And proximity….the words of consecration refer to “this bread” and “this wine.”

          I’ve seen images from non-catholic churches, pre and post COVID, of people with home made/personal bread and wine in little cups. To each there own, but from a Catholic point of view, that’s a complete non-starter.

          Reply
  5. Gabby

    Open air Sermons on Mountainside are ok as long as parishoners maintain social distance. Those who have ears to hear shall listen.

    Reply

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